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November 10, 1928 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-10

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ZDAY,

10, 1928

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE

~DAY, 10, 1928 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAO~

A '.-L a

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LEAGUE BAZAAR WILL
HAVE, FASHION SHOW
AS MAIN ATTRACTION
SHOW WILL BE STAGED BY
CROWLEY-MIILNER OF
DETROIT

W e

A. A. Organized
In Specialized Way

Importance Of
Sunlight Is Urged

SCHED

UI E OF HOCKYAMERICAN AND CHINESE WOMEN
E AOflhIPKfY ALIKE, SAYS CHINESE STUDE[

Cora Opines

I

I

JNT1

(Edit
ond of
plain
of the
tion.)
n o
mum
foster
igan v
tic asc

STUDENTS TO BE MODELS g
executi
ager fa
Most Popular Songs And Stunts e p
From Junior Girls' Play are ele
To Be Included for the
This
As a feature of the entertain- Smithe
ment of the Women's .league and vice-pr
Inter-Church bazaar, a fashion '30, sec
show will be given this year, Hilda '30. tre
Mary Evans, '29, general bazaar with t
chairman, has announced. The sports,
show will be staged by the Crow- boardt
ley-Milner company of Detroit, of W. A
and, will be presented immediate- recorde
ly following the performances of publicil
the Sophomore circus. The show mer, '3
itself will be preceded and fol- ager, D
lowed by the most popular songs membe
and stunts from the Junior Girls' Thei
Play, "For the Love of Pete." sportsa
"Tom," "Sally", and "Peter" will anyone
participate in this. sport m
Only sports clothes and acceso- subject
ries will be modeled and demon- '29; ba
strated. Coats, jackets, sweaters, basebal
skirts, and jewelry will be iielud- ing, Eli
ed, and models will be on display chesis),
during the whole bazaar. The fecing
clothes are being purchased in ael, '31
New York by Miss Jane Singleton, '31; ou
buyer for the sports wear depart- riding,
ment of Crowley-Milner's, and IreneC
former proprietor of a shop here Zauer,'
in Ann Arbor, especially for the son, '3
women who are to model the Eamon,
frocks... Although sales will not be will be
made at the time of the fashion about t
show, orders will be taken at that are in
time.
The women modeling are all
University students, and the money U
paid for their services is given to
the League, as are the proceeds
from. the. show. Those modeling IL
areera Johnson, '29, Margaret F
Bush '30, Frances Whipple, '31,
Margaret Eamon, '31, Catherine
Beardsee, '30, Florence Watch- Sring
Pocket._29, Josephine Welch, '29,.spread
Hilda Mary Evans, '29, Ruth Bish- mended
op,30, Roberta Reed, '31, Martha a recen
-Peters, Margaret Arthur, '29, fti
fllorence Frandsen, '31, and Marie of this al
SIartung, '29. abilitie
Tickets for the show will be on make ti
sale in advance and are priced at mittee
450 cents. general
p might bi
Notices The%
14 i. iterest
The American Association of 1october
' University Women will be the much
guests of Dr. A. G. Ruthven and time o
the Museum i staff on Saturday. A he
:rogram beginning with a tour of the me
the building at 2:30 o'clock will be numero
followed by an address by Dr. the wor
Ruthven on "The Museum: Past, remains
4.)Present,. and Future." All women reason t
eligible to membership in the or- if the
ganization are invited to be pres- spring
ten will be
M ak & Co. 161
a q

tor's Note: This is the sec-
a series of articles to ex-
the organization and work
Women's Athletic Associa-
rder to strive for the opti-
in athletic activity and to
social activity among Mich-
tomen, the Women's Athle-
sociation is organized in a
specialized way. Besides the
ve officers, there is a man-
or every sport in which wo-
participate. These officers
cted in the spring to serve
ensuing year.
Year the president is Betty
r, .'29, Dorothy Touff, '30,
esident, Frances Sackett,
retary, and Arliehe Heilman,
usurer. These officers, along
he managers of the various
make up the executivej
through which the business
. A. is conducted. The point
r, Gertrude Smith, '30, the
ty manager, Marjorie Foll-
0, and the intramural man-
7orothy Griffith, '30, are also
rs of the board.'
names of the managers of
are here listed in order that
who is interested in any
may get information on the
. Hockey, Marie Hartwig,
sketball, Jessie Church, '29;
1, Helen Wilson, '31; bowl-
zabeth Wood; dancing (or-
Jeanette Saurborn, '29;
and archery; Janet Mich-
golf, Katharine McMurray,
tdoor, Frances Whipple, '31;
Dorothy Lyons, '29; rifle,
Cook, '29; swimming, Ann
'29; tennis, Margaret Ohl-
30, and track Margaret
'31. Any of these officers
glad to give information
heir sports, many of which
progress now.

"The Dr. sJa:is I:GA ES
"The importance of sunlight in!
replacing deficiencies and thereby
maintaining a normal mineral Final Gam
metabolism, can not be overesti- Be P
mated," was the contention of Dr. Oth
Katharine Jarvis when she spoke
before therWomen's Research club BAN UE
at its last regular meeting on Nov. BNU
5.
Dr. Jarvis said in part, "Among Interclas
the many functions of calcium in second ro
the human body are those of pro- will be p
ducing normal bone and tooth de- dates, acc
velopment; maintaining nervous '29, manag
excitability and muscular contrac- Tuesday, N
tion; and exerting an antagonistic iors; sop3
action to certain other inorganic Thursday,
irons in the tissue fluid. The sophomore.
study of calcium metabolism isTuesday, .
carried out by the production of nen; junio
rickets in laboratory animals with The fina
an appropriate diet and investi- first round
gating the factors which cure this 4:15 next
condition. The importance of sun- seniors an
light in this connection can not with each
be overestimated." clashing w
4:30 the
1P'AV will play
club. The

mes in First Round
layed Off Tuesday;
her Dates Named

Will'

T DATE IS NOV. 22
ss hockey games for the
und of the tournament
layed on the .,following
ording to Marie Hartwig,
ger of the tournament:
Nov. 13-seniors vs. jun-
homores vs. freshmen;
Nov. 15-seniors vs.
s; juniors vs. freshmen;
gov. 20-seniors vs. fresh-
ors vs. sophomores.
l series of games in the
d will be played off at
Tuesday afternoon, the
d freshmen contending
other, and the juniors
with the sophomores. At
freshman second team
the Ann Arbor hockey
game that was played
the freshman second
d the Motley club this
which was not com-
is counted as a victory
otley club.

110 IifIUII ILU i.

"Chinese girls are just as giddy
and talkative as American women,"
said Miss Lucy Wang, Barbour felb
Sow from Foochaw, China, who is
working here for her Ph.D. degree.
in education.
"I thought when I came to the
United States for the first time,
that the American girls would be
different perhaps, but I laughed to
myself, soon, for I found that they
are just the same underneath as
they are in China, Miss Wang con-
tinued, "and they like fun just as
well."
Hwa Nan college, a school for
girls in China of which Miss Wang
will be president when she returns
next year, is one of the two wom-
en's colleges in China, and the only
one in southern China. It offers a
senior high school course of three
years and the regular four-year
college course terminating in an
Supper To Ge Given
By School Of Music

I

TO FEATURE MEETING
"Where But in America" by
Oscar Wolfe is the one-act play
selected by Mummers society, to be
given at their next meeting Thurs-
day, Nov. 22, at Martha Cook
building. Helen Workman, '30, will
direct the play.
The cast will include Mr. Efpen-
hayne-Dora Vandenburg, '30; Mrs.
Efpenhayne-Jeanette Dale, '31,
and ,Hilda-Florence Frandsen, 31.
Katharine Burt, '30, will head the
costumes committee, with Nina
Lindborg, '30, as assistant. Blos-
som Bacon, '30, is chairman of the
properties committee, and she
will be assisted by Leone Lee, '29,
and Virginia Trowbridge, '30.
At the last meeting held Thurs-
day afternoon at the Gamma Phi
Beta house, a program of two
readings and two short plays was
presented by the new members
and a discussion' of "Porgy" was l
held.
Apples Are For Sale I
At Hockey GamesI

between
squad an
week, but
pleted, wa
for the Me

Tickets for the hockey banquet
on Nov. 22 will be on sale this
coming week. They should be ar-
ranged for through Marie Hartwig,
or Helen Wilson, '31. They will
cost one dollar.
o 0
Interclass Hockey Standings I
Won Lost Tied
Seniors......3 0 0 I
I Juniors .......0 2 1 I
I Sophomores . .1 1 1
I Freshmen ... .1 2 0 I
0 0
TOPAZ IS NOVEMBER GEM
The topaz is your birthstone if
you were born in November. It is
the emblem of strength and
friendship, and its strength was
supposed by the ancients to in-
creased with the increase of the
moon. The ancients also believed
that it banished the terrors of the
night and protected the wearer
from communicable diseases.
The supersitition has been hand-
s .1

As the first combined social event
of the year, the Student Council
of the School of Music is sponsor-
ing a supper party for both men
and women students to be given
from 6 until 10 o'clock on Nov. 19
on the mezzanine floor of the
School of Music.
A buffet dinner will be served,
after which there will be tables for
cards in the smaller rooms, and
dancing with orchestra music in
the main hall.
At this party also, the student
who received the highest grades
for last semester's work will be
awarded the scholarship cup which
is presented semi-annually.
ed down that a topaz, engraved
with the figure of a flying falcon,
will gain the favor of important
personages for the wearer.
Like many other precious stones,
the topaz was long credited with
healing powers. St. Hildegrade rec-
ommended it above all other stones
as a remedy for blindness. Its
greatest virtue is told in the fol-
lowing familiar lines :
"Firm Friendship is November's
and she bears
True love beneath the topaz that
she wears."

A. B. degree, according to Miss
Wang.
Hwa Nan was founded in 1921
and at present has a student body
of about 104 in the college and 116
in the high school.
"I myself, became a member of
the freshmanbclass when Hwa Nan
was first opened," Miss Wang
stated, "and when I and another
girl left to come to the United
States to school, there were only
three students left in the class to
graduate, so you can see that at-
tendance has increased a great
deal since then.
"All except a small number of
women are housed in dormitories
at this college," Miss Wang went
on,'""and they participate in much
the same extra-curricular activities
as one does here. For instance,
there is a Patriotic club, organized
since the Nationalist movement to
further the growth of loyalty to the
new China. Also," Miss Wang said,
"there are the Y. W. C. A. and the
student Government societies."
Regular courses and the study of
Chines literature are most col-
monly taken by the Chinese col-
lege woman student, according to
Miss Wang, though a few years ago,
the study of the standard language
was also included because of the
variety of dialects in China. How-
ever, today, through the spread of
education, ' a knowledge of the
standard speech is taken for grant-
ed and the study of Chinese in col-
lege is confined to the written
language which, though used all
over 'China, has never undergone
any great change. In com-
menting on the dialectical differ-
ences in China, Miss Wang said
that among all the Chinese stu-
dents on the campus here, only two
speak her particular dialect.
"No matter how slow the pro-
gress may seem to be," she said in
conclusion, at least I am sure that
there is some advance being made
by women of the present genera-
tion."
Get Acquainted With

Well, my dear, now that a few
trivial and unimportant details and
events are over with and taken
care of, such as soc mid-seme-
sters-what an exam!-presiden-
tial elections, and very personal
affairs, I can return to my job and
the defense of my sex.
No, Lark is not the offender this
time, but one of my dear-oh very
dear professors, who more or less
maliciously maligned the feminine
sex the other morning in class.
Among other things, he said he
would not go across the street to
hear a woman speak, though he
did admit that women usually had
the last word. But he didn't go so
far as to acknowledge that it was
either because they had something
vitally important to say or because
the masculine half of the argu-
ment is too squelched to say any-
thing further anyway.
I must give the man credit,
though, for saying that he owned
something to his mother. That is
the least he could do, of course.
T'd like to know where these high
and mighty men would be if it
were not for us women. They
couldn't get along at all without
us, and they know it, though they
won't admit it. We inspire them
to noble deeds, we console them
for the mistakes they make even
when we know that a woman of
any intelligence at all would never
dream of doing some of the stu-
pid things they do, and we-gen-
erally speaking that is-feed the

brutes + Did yau_

aver see aflyth°

more helpless than an untraine
man trying to get himself some
thing to eat, even out of a can
And yet some men are so lacking i
the proper appreciation of thing
that they declare themselves ca:
able of managing without us.

E ,ARLY ELECTIO N
lEADSOF SPREAD
g election of the Freshman
committee will be recom-
to the women of the
an class, it was decided at
it meeting of the members
year's committee. If there'
ck of knowledge as *o the
of the women so as to
he election of definite com-
members impractical, the
and assistant chairman
be chosen.
sophomore women actively
ed in the spread held in
found that there is too
fork to be done in the two
that elapse between the
f the committeeelections
e date of, the spread, since
nbers are interested in the
us fall activities and often
rk of carying out the plans
for a few women. For this
the sophomores believe that
elections are held in the
for next year's spread it
more successful.

I

Hello Boys!
I am lochted at
607 Church

In order to cary out the famous
axiom, "An apple a day keeps the
doctor away," and to have things
in keeping with the spirit of fall,
W. A. A. is now selling big rosy
apples of the Jonathan variety at
the interclass and intramural
hockey games every night. Eliza-
beth Woods, '31, of the executive
board has been appointed to have
charge of the sale of the fruit.
Players in the games are not al-
lowed to buy the apples until after
the games are over.
b
Ii

s :,i; rY r .:

ImESERV ATIV N i,
For All mportant
Lake and Ocean Lines
'Tou rs. Crie
Indepedent Travel
E. G. Kuebler
Gen. Steamship Agency
601 A. Huron Ph. 6412

Schaeberle & Son
MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything in Musical
Instruments and Supplies
Radiola and Atwater-Kent
Radios
110 So. Main St.

I stil do First Class
Work
Cleaning, Pressing
Remodeling
50 Years at the Trade
Louis Lindemann

i

ANN ARBOR

iI

Ladies'
Dressse

Go-

E ,D S......

(Up to 10 plaits)"
Cleaned
and
Hand Pressed
$1.25
"Cash & Carry"
No better work
anywhere

I

Extra Money!
Only a few of us are lucky
enough to have all the money
we want when we're at school.
The big things take so much of
our allowance money that there
is seldom any left for the little
things. But by buying at Mont-
gomery Ward & Co.'s store you
can actually save quite a bit
from your weekly allowance.
There are so many things you
need here at equal or even bet-
ter quality at much lower prices.
Just come over to our store and
take a look at the superb values.
Style right, of course.

Have You Tried,
WARD'S

Store ?

I

Mack & Co.

I

PIER CE'S
CAFETERIA

Same Style and Quality But
Consistently Lower
Prices

1201/2 E. Liberty

Serving Hours
11 O'clock to 1:30 O'clock
5 O'clock to 7:30 O'clock

WHITE SWAN
LAUNDRY CO.
Across from the Majestic

Sundays
12 to 2:30

FOR YOUR ROOM
ALL-SILK QUILTED ROBES
In rose, turquoise, or Copen Blue and cerise
changeable silk. Soft and warm.
Each ...............................
LADIES' BATH ROBE
Finest thing for studying during chilly winter
evenings. Blue and tan. $5.98
Each ..............................
COLORFUL CRETONNES
For trunk and chair covers, curtains and closet
drapes. Very pretty.19C
Yard..........................9
GREEN OR YELLOW ALARM CLOCKS
Make those early classes on time! Colored alarms
are the newest thing. 1.49
Each ...................... ............7

HAT
BOX

Two
Compart-

I

Ed

One side for clothes, the other for
hats. Just what you need for the
week-end trips. Of black imitaiton
patent leather, bound with tan kara-
tol. Very clever and $5.25
convenient .................

ANNOUNCING THE FORMAL

convenient..........

OPENING
OF ANN ARBOR'S LATEST

Who Cares for Rain?

THINGS TO,

SAVE

ON

It's no matter when
one is prepared by car-
rying a good slicker.

Collegiate Women's Shop

$5.98

LAUNDRY CASES
Save money on this item. Also remember--
6 refills
for $1...............:..................$.6
COLORED FOUNTAIN PENS
Excellent writers. In orange, jade, mahogany,
amber, cherry red $2.28
or black-.... ... .................
COTY'S FACE POWDER
Regular $1 size L'Origan face powder
Special value9.........
PRINTED CHIFFON VELVETS
For those who make their own frocks and dresses.
Fashionable shades.
Yard ......... ..........................
WOODBURY'S FACIAL SOAP

with

I

I

A COMPLETE NEW LINE OF

A special leatherette
rain coat made especial-
ly fqr misses. Combines
a lot of style with abso-
lute water-proofness. In

£11

I

C'nnTA Tf1773 f-%(f-4T7C'A ATT"% T TATf' T!Fn TV

I

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t I

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