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September 28, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-09-28

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ESTABLISHED
1890

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a1133

MEMBER I
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXIX, No. 5 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1928

EIGHT PAGES

LITTLE MAY

ASK FEDERAL LIQUOR INVESTIGATION

HERE

ADMINISTRATION
LACKS LEADER,
SAYS AL SMITH

ASSAILS FAILURE OF G. O.
TO PRESENT PROGRAM
OF FARM RELIEF

P.

DISCUSSES IMMIGRATION
Would Retain Restricting Features'
Of Present Immigration
Limits
(By Associated Press)
ST. PAUL, Sept. 27.-In another
assault on his Republican opposi-
tion, Gov. Smith tonight held that
the "fundamental weakness" of
the Harding and Coolidge adminis-
trations has been a lack of leader-
ship.
The Democratic presidential
nominee touched on the farm
problem, again assailing the Re-
publicans for a failure to work ow
an effective relief program, and
declared that there was a whisper-
ing campaign to misrepresent his
stand. on inland waterway develop-
ment and, immigration.
In his speech prepared for de-
livery in the St. Paul auditorium
-after spending much of the day ir;
nearby Minneapolis, Smith recalled
that as governor of New York he
had favored, like his Republicar
predecessor, the so-called all-
American route through the state
for a waterway between the Great
Lakes and the sea. He reiterated
however, the readiness, expressed
in his acceptance speech, to be
guided by the findings of engin-
eering experts as between this
route and the proposed St. Law-
rence river waterway.
As for immigration, the Deme
cratic candidate declared "there is
no issue between either the parties
or the, candidates on the question
of sustaining and keeping in fu
force and effect the restraining fea-
tures of the present immigration
laws."
The Democratic standard bearer
accused the Republicans of doin
little or nothing in recent years
in the way of comprehensive in-
land water development, and of
being niggardly in making appr(
priations for such work and flo
control.-
. He insisted that the Republicar
party platform in recent years had
failed to come out for ,development
of one lakes to the Atlantic route
in preference to the other, and
quoting Herbert Hoover's accep-
tance speech,. contended that his
opponent also had failed to take
a clear outstand in that contro-
versy.
With regard to immigration the
Democratic nominee said that "thc
whisperers would as a people be-
leve that I favor a letting down
of the restricting bars and openin:
of the flood gates that immigra-
tion made for into the country."
The Democratic and Republican
platform planks on immigratior
the New York governor asserted,
both declare, in different language
for preservation of laws limiting
immigration.
TO HOLD VOCAL
AUDITION HERE

SALE OF 'ENSIAN
COUPONS TO STOP
Unlike last year when coupons
were sold throughout the year, the
Michiganensian will discontinue its
sale of coupons after today, it was
announced in the 'Ensian business
office yesterday.
After this week, subscriptions
wil go. on sale for $4.00, and those
who have bought coupons will have
one dollar . deducted from that
amount. The full price will be
charged all others.
This price will remain in effect
until Dec. 15, at which time it will
be raised to $5.00. Possessors of
coupons will be allowed to deduct
$1.00 from the standard price of
the yearbook until Feb. 15.
Members of the 'Ensian business
staff also announced yesterday that
every fraternity and sorority hav-
ing 15 paid subscriptions will re-
ceive one free copy of the book
with the name of the organization
placed on the book in gold leaf.
HNI FOOTBALLOF IFICIALS
Athletic Association Announces
Regerees For Ball Games
Of Coming Season
JAMES MASKERS SIGNED
Officials for the University of
Michigan footballs games, in both
the "A" and "B" c'lasses, are being
announced today by the Athletic
association. For the Big Ten and
the Navy games officials of na-
tional repute, many of whom have
several times previously handled
Michigan games, have been secur-
ed. For the "B" games, in which
teams mainly within the state will
furnish the opposition, the officials
have been picked from the best in
this section.
James Maskers (Northwestern)
veteran Western Conference official
has been signed to handle the Illi-
nois and Ohio State games, the
two considered most important on
the Wolverine schedule. Maskers
was referre at the Ohio State game
last year when the Michigan sta-
dium was dedicated.
Officials for the Class "A" games
are:
Ohio Wesleyan, Oct. 6, Referee,
Lambert (O.S.U.); umpire, Huston
(Parsons); field judge, Hamm;
Head linesman, Maxwell, (O.S.U.).
Indiana, Oct. 13, Referee, Nichols
(Oberlin); umpire, Haines (Yale);
field judge, Daniels; head linesman
Ray.I
Ohio State, at Columbus, Oct. 20.
Referee Maskers, (Northwestern);
umpire, Haines (Yale); field judge,
Daniels, head linesman, Ray.
Wisconsin, Oct. 27, Referee,
Nichols, (Oberlin), umpire, Haines
(Yale); field judge, Gardner; head
linesman, Molony.
Illinois, Nov. 3. Referee Maskers
(Northwestern); umpire, Haines
(Yale); field judge, Young; head
linesman, Huston.
U. S. Navy, at Baltimore, Nov. 10,
Referee Crowell, (Swarthmore);
umpire, Schommer; (Chicago);
field judge, Hackett, (West Point);
head linesman, Hellenbeck, (Penn-
sylvania).
Michigan State, Nov. 17, Referee
Schott; umpire Gardner; field
judge, Thompson; head linesman,
Wyatt.
Iowa, Nov. 24, Referee Nichols,
(Oberlin); umpire Hedges; field
judge, Young, head linesman,
Wyatt.

HOOVER SPEAKS'
TO IRGINIANS
AT WASHINGTON
DELEGATION OF FIRST VOTERS
RECEIVED BY CANDIDATE
AT HIS OFFICE
WORKS ON NEXT SPEECH
Mann, Southern Campaign Leader,
Confers With Nominee On Return
From Tennessee
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Sept. 27.-Her-
bert Hoover described the Repub-
lican party today as the one of
action for the benefit of the coun-
try without regards to the sectorial
or special interests.
Addressing a delegation of first
voters from Virginia, the Repub-
lican presidential nominee said'
that the party must approach the'
host of new problems that have
arisen in the "same forward look-I
ing attitude of mind which we have'
given to the other problems of the
past. "
Nominee Studies East
The candidate 'interrupted a re-
newed study of the eastern political
situation to receive the delegation.
Between times, he puts in addition-
al strokes upon his Elizabethan,
Tenn., speech which is now near its
final shape.
In a series of conferences with
party leaders, Hoover again took
up the eastern problem. Repre-
sentative Franklin E. Fort, of New
Jersey, secretary of the Republican
national committee, breakfasted
with the nominee and gave him a
report covering his observation of
the situation during the last sev-
eral weeks in New England.
Confers With Mann
Before meeting the delegation
from Virginia, Hoover also confer-
red with Horace A. Mann, director
of the southern campaign, who has
only recently returned from a visit
into Tennessee.
The nominee told the first voters
that "the decision as to the party
which you would ally yourself in
your first vote is one of the most
important decisions in your life."
Thomas L. Procter, of Richmond,
who headed the delegation, told
Hoover that the group came to him
"on the basis of good citizenship,"
adding that the nation needed his
heart, his mind, and his knowledge
at this time.
MEDICAL SOCIETY
MEETS IN DETROIT
The Michigan State Medical
Society is in convention in Detroit
on Wednesday, Thursday, and Fri-
day of this week. Physicians- from
the University hospital play z
large part in the program of this
convention, especially in the sci-
entific sessions.
Of special note is Dr. Carl Eber--
bah's contribution. Dr. Eberbach
who is closely connected with the
University hospital, came from
Milwaukee to present a paper be-
fore a meeting of the Society to-
day. The subject of his paper will!
be "Treatment of Pyelitis" in
which he will deal with the infec--
tion of the kidneys. Dr. Hugh
Cabot, dean of the Medical school
here will discuss Dr. Eberbach's
paper. The convention wil close
soon atterwards.

President Little's Letter Marks
New Step in Campus Liquor Problem
Two years ago last February, President Clarence Cook Little
presented an ultimatum to the fraternities on the campus, offer-
ing them three alternatives in regard to the liquor situation in
the houses. (1) The alumni of the fraternities were to pledge
themselves that no more drinking was to take place in the
,hapter houses. (2) The house could appoint a faculty man who
was to take the responsibility for proper conduct in that house.
(3) The house was to be left open to investigation at any time by
officials from the office of the dean of students.}
At the start of the next school year, the office of the dean
of students banned all fraternity parties on the Saturday nights
of local football games.
The following letter from President Little to Dean Joseph
A. Bursley will explain the third step which University officials
are now contemplating, subject to approval of alumni, frater-
nities, the Student council, and the administration.
September 26, 1928.
Dean J. A. Bursley,
Dean of Students,
Campus.
Dear Dean Bursley:
Ever since coming to Michigan I have been conscious of
the harm done to the University by rumors of drinking and
uncontrolled behavior at fraternity dances and house parties.
I know that we have all cooperated in efforts to meet the
situation and that we believe that the reports are grossly exag-
Berated. Nevertheless I have been repeatedly asked by students,
alumni, and citizens of the state why no effort is made to
check up on the situation.
In my opinion the University is not the agent to conduct
such an investigation, although for the protection of the fra-
ternities as well as itself it should, in my opinion, see that such
an investigation is made.
Students at the University are residents of the community
and as such should be expected to conform with the law and
to respect other residents. I am sure that they recognize this
fact and would welcome an opportunity to prove that the rumors
are not founded upon fact.
It therefore seems to me more that we should approach the
Treasury department and request that one or more federal
agents be delegated to Ann Arbor for a period sufficient to estab-
lish the correctness or incorrectness of the rumors in question. :
I think that it would be a splendid thing if the frater-
nities and their alumni; the student council and the University
authorities should join in making the request and hope that
you will be willing to use this little as the means of starting
conferences with them. If the matter could be brought to a
head by October tenth or fifteenth I should think that it would
be of more value than it would be at a later date.
Sincerely yours,
(Signed) C. C. Little.
CCL:MC

KRAUS OUTLINES
PHARMACY WORK
Work and activities which will be
carried out throughout the year in
the College of Pharmacy were out-
lined at a meeting of all students
of that school in room 151 Chem-
istry building Thursday afternoon.
Dean Edward H. kraus traced
the advancement which has been
made during the past year in the
profesion of pharmacy and stated
that beginning in the fall of 1932,
all pharmacy colleges belonging to
the national association will offer
only four year courses.
Announcement of the various
prizes and fellowships which are of-
fered each year to outstanding stu-
dents was made, and the program
of the Prescott club was outlined.
Several well known speakers have
already been booked for this year.
The enrollment in the College of
Pharmacy is practically the same
as it was last year, it was an-
nounced.
PLAN GRID PROGAMS
FOR SIXHOME GAMES
Booklet For Illinois Contest Will
Contain Record Of Michigan
Athletic Teams

PROPOSAL NOT RELATED
POSSIBLE LIFTING
OF AUTO BAN

TO

PACK TO

PRESIDENT AIMS
TO INVESTIGATE
LOCAL RUMORS

BE IN CHARGE

Football programs will be pub-
lished for each of the six home
games of the Wolverine 'Varsity
grid team, according to an an-
nouncement today by the Athletic
Association of the University. A
large program of the type issued
for the Ohio State stadium dedi-
cation game last year will be pub-
lished for the Illinois game, while;
regular sized programs will be on
sale for the other five, games.
These programs contain the
name and numbers of each player
on the two teams, pictures of the
leading players, and other inter-
esting information concerning the
game and the past athletic compe-
tition between the two schools.
For the Illinois game the book-
lets will have 96 pages. A consid-
erable amount of data about Michi-
gan's athletic record and its pres-
ent equipment, with special em-1
phasis on the most recent addition,
to the University athletic pladt,-.
the Intramural Building, being!
used for the first time, this year,

PRIVATE AUDIENCES 1
TO SEE PLAY CLASSI
Extensive preparation, are being.
made by Valentine B. Windt, the1
new director of play production ac-
tivities, for the production of al
number of plays to be staged en-
tirely by the classes and to be in!
every way catering to a privatel
audience rather than catering to;
box office figures.
Windt comes here after work at
Cornell University and Princeton
University as well as the Carnegie1
Institute of Technology drama!
school. In addition he has had con-1
siderable experience with the
American laboratory theater of New
York as well as certain neighbor-
hood theaters in the vicinity of
New York City. While there he1
gained experience in the practical
side of all fields of production and
amassed a strong background for
further work along similar lines.
The aim of Windt's courses will'
be to train potential persons in the
theater not only in the technical
theory and production end of thel
work, but rather to combine this
work With real practical experience
in the producing and directing of
plays as well as the participation
in such productions.
PAINTED TABLESI
GRACETAPROOM
By Gumley
Of course it's too late to do any-
thing about it now, but perhaps
this sad story of the pitiful situa-
;-inthp ne nhblp and

EPDM
NOTICI
Dr. Warrer

C OF COLDS
ED ON CAMPUS I
n E. Forsythe, directingj
f fl-a TT icr~ irTe li

0 CONFER WITH COUNCIL
o Action Will Be Taken Unless
Students and Alumni Favor
Federal Intervention
President Clarence Cook Little
,esterday proposed that Federal
)rohibition agents be assigned to
nvestigate rumors of drinking and
ncontrolled conduct at fraternity
lances and house parties, a letter
rom the President to Joseph A.
ursleyhdean of students, which
vas made public yesterday showed.
n his letter, President Little made
t very clear that he believed the
umors to be exaggerated, but tha
e wanted to establish the "cor-
ectness or incorrectness" of the
,eports, as they were injuring the
Jniversity.
Letter Made Public Yesterday
The President's letter was made
ublic a few hours after the Stu-
ent council went on record in
avor of a "dry" student body. The
etter was written before the Coun-
il took action, and according to
Dean Bursley, its existence was un-
mown to that lody.
Is Unrelated to Auto Ban
President Little made it clear
that the step was unrelated in any
way to a possible lifting of the
automobile ban. He said in a
tatement, "I always have been in
favor of permitting well-bea.ved
ipperclassmen to use automobiles.
However, we are not attempting to
nake a bargain with the students.
f certain things happen in clean-
ing up the liquor situation, it does
not mean that certain other things
will happen." This was an
answer to rumors prevalent on the
ampus that as soon as the liquor
taw was enforced properly, the ba
would be relaxed. The President
said he favored a modified ban,
somewhat like that of two years
ago, but that there must first be
temperate, responsible student
body.
Dean Bursley said that a meet-
ing of fraternity representatives,
members of the Student Council,
alumni, and University authoritie
would soon be called to consider
the President's suggestion. D
Little said that no federal investi-
gation would be made unless all
the various parties agreed that
such a course should be taken.
ADELPHI DEBATES
TAMMANY POLICY
The Adelphi House of Represen-
tatives, the oldest forensic organi-
zation on the campus held its
first meeting of the season Tues-
day evening in the Adelphi room.
The gathering was small but en-
thusiastic and a spirited debate,
presided over by Speaker Lloyd,
was-held on: Resolved: That this
House condemns the practices of
Tammany Hall and Al Smith. The
resolution was overwhelmingly de-
feated by a viva voce vote.
Adelphi meets every Tuesday at
7:30 on the fourth floor of Angell
Hall. All men students on the
campus are eligible for member-
ship, and everyone interested in
debating is cordially invited to at-
tend any of the ,sessions.
TAX EXEMPTOIN
TREATY REACHED
(By Assocated Press)
WASHINGTON, Sept. 27.--After
seven years of negotitations, Can-
ada and the United States have
reached an agreement 'providing
for reciprocal exemption from tax-
ation in the two countries of the
income of vessels of foreign regis-
try operating on the Great Lakes
and connecting streams.
The agreement, reached at a
conference between representatives

I of the two Lxovernments at the

.. .........
,..
,3
..'
n

pysician of the university rieati will be included.
Service, stated in an interview yes- For the other five games-Ohio I
terday that, while the situation is Wesleyan, Indiana, Wisconsin, Illi-
nois, Michigan State and Iowa
in no way alarming, the campus nos1ihgnSaeadIw
n bno styrk ng, the usuampou- State,-the programs will have 32
has been struck by the usual out- j pages. These will sell for 25 cents
break of unpleasant colds. "The 1 each, while the one at the Iiinois
situation is no worse than usual, game will be 50 cents.
and we do not fear a dangerous The programs are published by
epidemic s a i d D r. Forsythe. the Athletic association of the Uni-
"These colds always crop out at versity under the direction of'
this time of the year and we must Phillip C. Pack, '18.
tolerate them as patiently as we
can." DRINKING FOUNT
Dr. Forsythe stated that while DRINKIN G EFOUNT
there is no definite cure known for BECOMES GEYSER
treating colds and not much in the
way of preventing them, he would Bursting its bonds last night by
suggest that everyone be careful some unknown means, one of the
not to subject the body to sudden trio of drinking spouts on the
changes of temperature, a condi- fountain at the State street end of
tion which lowers the resistance of the diagonal went on a rampage
the body and rarely fails to bring and created an Old Faithful, Jr.
on a cold. "Students are particu- that makes up in enthusiasm what
larly unfortunate in this way," he it lacks in volume.
said, "since most of the classrooms Up to a late hour last night the
are very warm and the body per-. thin but ambitious stream of tasty
spires freely before going out into Ann Arbor water reached an alti-
the cold air." tude of twenty feet, which looks
The best thing to do if you have rather imposing considering its size
a cold, according to Dr. Forsythe, and might well be used by giraffes
is to remain indoors as much as or aviators, but unless the B & G
possible and to get plenty of sleep. boys either cap the flood or build
In case of an extreme cold, or if a goldfish pond around it with
influenza is feared, it is always ad- proper drainage, the drainage sys-
visable to see the Health Service at tem in the adjacent area will be
once, he said. worked overtime.
CHRISTIAN TO GIVE FIRST RECITAL
. IN SERIES OF WEEKLY CONCERTS'

In an attempt to discover and to
aid new vocal talent, the local au-
dition of the second annual At-
water-Kent amateur singers' con-
Jest will be held at 8;00 o'clock
Thursday nighteOctober 4th at the
University SchoolofMusic. Prizes
totaling $17,000 dollars are being
offered in this country-wide com-
petition to uncover unknown ar-
tists.
Anyone who is strictly an ama-
teur singer tchurch singing is con-
sidered in the amateur group) may
compete. The contestant may sing
any song that he desires, but musi
furnish his own accompanist.
The contest is divided into four
groups, local, state, district, (si>
districts in the country), and na-
tional. First prize consists of $5,-
000 dollars, a gold decoration, anc
two years tuition in a leading con-

:'
r.
rC
t

INTEREST EVIDENCED IN SPEAKERS
LISTED ON ORATORICAL PROGRAM

From the unusual interest al-
ready shown in the Oratorical As-
sociation lecture course as an-
nounced for the 1928-1929 season,
indications are that the one this
year will be one of the most suc-
cessful ever offered. The general
opinion is that the course is the
finest of its kind ever given.
The interest is fairly well divided
among the nine celebrities who
make up the course with Count von
Luckner, Graham McNamee, Zell-
ner, Stephen Leacock, Richard Hal-

been offered in Ann Arbor, the
greatest speakers of the period
have appeared on the Oratorical
Asociation series.
The series will open with CountI
Felix von Luckner, the famous
"Sea Devil," on November 1st and
will be concluded with the number
on April 30th.
The Oratorical Association in its
attempt to bring the best speakers,
in the country to Ann Arbor for
the benefit of the students of the
University, intends to make no

tl existig i tie ± nuum l"41The first of the weekly Wednes- 1
manly Union Taproom will prevent day afternoon organ recitals by
any such occurance in the future. j Palmer Christian, University or-
The point is that the age-worn, ganist, will be given Wednesday
neatly carved, time-honored and afternoon, October 3, at 4:15 ir
whatnot tables have. been-var- Hill Auditorium on the new $75,00"
nished!1 Where once the taproom Friez Memorial organ which was
boasted of an informal atmosphere, dedicated last spring during the
an atmosphere that breathed of May Festival. The practice of giv-
comfort, ease, warmth, and a ing free weekly organ recitals for
foaming beaker of malted milk, it students and citizens of Ann Ar-

ium, he made an eight weeks' toui
of the United States and Canada.
Beginning his itinerary in the east-
ern cities, he went north to Can-
ada and so travelled west, return-
ing by way of the southwestern
part of the country.
Because of its greatly varied tone
qaulities, each recital promises t
be of new interest. Further di-
versity is assured by Mr. Christian.

i

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