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November 04, 1928 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-04

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Vol. XXXIX. No. 37. PART ONE ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1928R
MCHGAN GAINS FIRST VICTORY

PRICE FIVE CENTS
3-0

PEMBROKE PASS TO REYNOLDS
IN LAST MINUTE OF PLAY
MAKES LONE SCORE
FIRST HALF IS WESTERN'S

Geistert Stars In Last Half
Outplay Kalamazoo Team;
Field Is Muddy.

To(

By Cleland Wyllie
KALAMAZOO, Nov. 3.-Battling
on even terms with Western State
Normal until the last four seconds
of play, the Junior Varsity today
went down to defeat 6 to 0 when
Reynolds caught Pembroke's pass1
over the Michigan goal line to win
the game.
Western's famed running attack
failedtin crucial moments during
the first three quarters of the
game and the Michigan cubsturn-
ed back three threats on the part
of the home eleven during the first
half. Starting a successful offen-
sive of their own in the third pe-
riod the Juniors drove down the
field on successive long runs by
Mike Geistert, but the chance to
score failed when Hughes missed
a field goal. The first half was
Western's and the play for the
most part was in Michigan terri-
tory. In the last half, however,
Michigan outplayed the Brown
and Gold warriors until the last
few minutes, when the lone touch-
down was made. A muddy field
hindred both elevens.
Geistert Stars
For the Michigan cubs, Geistert
was again the outstanding per-
former on the offensive. Mike re-
peatedly circled the Teachers' ends
for lengthy gains. Hughes and
Widman divided the punting
duties, the latter having the best
of the competition. On first downs
Western State had a slight edge,
making seven as compared to six
for Michigan. In the first half,
the Junior Varsity made only one
fi t down as compared to three
for Western State.
Final Attack Fails
Michigan launched an attack in'
the closing minutes that kept the
ball in Western territory, but Geis-'
tert's pass, grounded over the goal
line. With the start of the last
half, Michigan came close to scor-
ing. Geistert broke loose for sev-
eral long runs to bring the leather
down to the Teachers' 15 yard
marker, but Hughes failed to kick
a field goal.
The rest of the game was evenly
played until the last few minutes
when Western started a drive from
the middle of the field that re-
sulted in a touchdown when Pem-
broke passed 15 yards to Reynolds.
The krick failed.
Lineups:
MICHIGAN W. S. T. C.
Carter........LE........ Strokis
Bergman......LT......Johnson
Sullo ..........LG.......Nickel
Cooke ..........C........ Welbes
Morgan .........RG........ Seorg
Hager.........RT........Evans
Kerr.........RE.... FReynolds
Geistert........QB .....Frendt
Wilson.......RH .......Malone
Lytle .........LH..... Hagadone
Hughes . .....QB......Barnhill
Referee-Thompson, Lawrence;
Umpre-etchel (Oberlin); Head
Linesman-Fleugal, Chicago field
judge-Bryant, U. of Pein.
Substitutes for Michigan: Wid-
man for Wilson, Bauer for Morgan,
Wison for Widman, Widman for
Wilson, Moyer for Hager, Kerr for
Carter, Decker for Bauer.
Western State: Pembroke for
Frendt, Lear for Malone, Frankoski
for Welbes, Reynolds for Nickel,
Harrsen for Evans, Williams for
Johnson, Conley for Hagadne, Lear
for Hagadone, Evans for Harrsen,
Corbet for Lear, Conley for Malone.

JoeGembis
Who chalked up the only counter
against the Illini when he kicked
a thirty yard field goal from place-
ment. The Michigan fullback also
backed up the lined and charged.
to perfection in his best game of
the year.
LITTLE WLLADDRESS
STUDENTSATCUH
Meeting To1Be Held Under Auspicesi
Of Various Religious Groups
Of Ann Arbor
TALK WILLBEGIN SERIES
President Clarence Cook Little
will speak on "The Church and the
Campus" at a Union student meet-
ing to be held tonight in the audi-c
torium of the First Methodistt
church, at the corner of Washing-
ton avenue and State street. The j
meeting, which is being held under1
the joint auspices of the Student]
Christian association and the stu-
dent religious organizations of Ann3
Arbor, is open to all, and a cordial
invitation is extended to any stu-J
dents and members of the faculty
who are interested in the subject.
Martin Mol, '30, president of the
Student Christian association, will
preside at the gathering, and will,
introduce the speaker.
This meeting will be the first oft
two Union student gatherings to
be held this year. The second will
take place during the second seme-1
ster, and another prominent
speaker will be procured to address
the audience. A previous an-
nouncement had been made to .theE
effect that the meeting would be
held in Lane hall. Attention is
called to the change, which was
necessitated by the, larger seating
capacity of the church. The meet-
ing tonight will be the first of its
kind that the president has ad-
dressed.
FOOTBALL SCORES
Colgate 14, Wabash 6.
Columbia 0, Cornell 0.
Yale 18, Dartmouth 0.
Pittsburgh 18, Syracuse 0.
Navy 37, West Virginia Wesley-
an 0.
Army 38, Depauw 12.
Georgetown 7, N. Y. U. 2.
Washington and Jefferson 13, La-
fayette 13.
Vanderbilt 14, Kentucky 7.
Georgia 13, Auburn 0.
North Carolina 6. North Carolina
State 0.
Mississippi 26, Clemson 7.
Virginia 20, Washington and Lee
13.

The Freshman engineers will
open the week's balloting next
Tuesday morning when they will
assemble at 11 o'clock in room 348
of the Engineering building to vote
for class president, vice-president,
secretary, and treasurer.
The freshman class of the liter-
ary college will meet at 4 o'clock
next Wednesday in Hill auditorium
for their elections.
]-HOP COMMITTEE1MEN
TO.BE CHOSEN TODAY
Representative Of Forestry School
To Be Included In Personnel
Of 1930 Committee
FEBRUARY 8 SET AS DATE
With three months still to pass
before the J-Hop of the class of
1930 will take place, the recently
elected members of the committee
will hold their first meeting at 11
o'clock this morning at the Union,
Harry Wallacei chairman of the
event, announced yesterday. At
this time, it is expected that the
committee chairman for the main
sub-committees will be named, and
if necessary, the members of these
sub-committees.
The J-Hop will be held on the
night of February 8, 1929, and will
be under the auspices of the class
of -1930. Arrangements to secure
the orchestras are already under
way; although none will be signed
definitely until later.
Fourteen men representing vari-
ous schools and colleges on the
campus are represented on the
committee. The committeemen were
selected at the recent Junior elec-
tions, at which, for the first time,
the chairman of the affair was se-
lected separately. Heretofore, the
candidate receiving the highest
number of votes in the college from
which the chairman was to be se-
lected, was automatically made
chairman.
The personnel of the committee
is: Harry Wallace, '30, chairman,
Charles Monroe, '30, Alan Bovard,
'30, Morris Lazar, '30, George Brad-
ley, '30, Phillip B. Allen, '30E, Rob-
ert McCoy, '30E, Ludwig Emde, '30E,
James B. Richardson, '30A, Robert
Heaney, '30L, Wilfred Orwig, '30Ed,
R. A. Conn, '30B. Ad., Clarence
Hahn, '30P, and a member from the
School of Forestry who has not yet
been announced by the Student
council, although elected.

HOOVER ON FINAL LAP
OF NATIONWIDE TRIP
GIVES TALKIN PUEBLO
NOMINEE URGES EVERY VOTER
TO BE ON HAND AT POLLS
IN COLORADO ADDRESS
IS LAST SPEECH OF TOUR
Condemns Competitive Tariff Idea
of Underwood Bili; Wants
Industrial Protection
(By Associated Press)
HOOVER TRAIN EN ROUTE TO
PUEBLO, Colo., Nov. 3.-On the
final lap of his homeward trip to
California, Herbert Hoover entered
Colorado late today for a brief.
speech at Pueblo, the last campaign
address of his trans-continental
journey.
Arrangements were made for the
Republican presidential nominee to
address a gathering in the southern
Colorado city while his train stop-
ped there for half an hour early
this evening
Travelling across Kansas during
the day Mr. Hooover made a num-
ber of rear platform appearances
despite the snow encountered in
the eastern part of the state and
the chill winds that forced him to
bundle himself up in an overcoat.
Crowd Hears Candidate
At Hoisington, where a large
crowd gathered at the station he
made an appeal for every voter to
go to the polls next Tuesday.
"The first duty of every American
citizen is to go to the polls," he
said, expressing 'the belief that the
voters' verdict would be right.
'The majority of the American
people are always right," he said.
Holding that the present cam-
paign was the most important in
many years, he said, "there are
not solely economic and business is-
sues, but also moral issues which
require the response of every
American at the polls."
The Republican presidential can-
didate condemned the Underwood
bill which he said had been a com-
petitive tariff measure and "had re-
duced the duty on commodities
produced in Colorado to such a lack
of protection that your industries
were crippled or helpless."

By Morris Quinn
Before more than 80,000 frenzied football fans Michigan's
fighting eleven staged a phenominal comeback yesterday afternoon
to hand a haughty Illini team its initial reverse of the season, 3-0, in
a game that was replete with thrills. By turning the tables on the,
Zuppke-men, the Maize and Blue grid warriors knocked them out
of a tie with Ohio State and Iowa for the lead in the 1928 Con-
ference title race.
Yesterday's bitterly contested battle saw history repeat itself, for
the third time in the annuals of Michigan-Illinois grid rivalry the
Wolverines upset the dope to avenge the defeat of the prevous year
by a 3-0 count. Frank Steketee, all-Amercan fullback, turned
the trick for the first time back in 1921 when he scored a place

0
. STATISTICS OF THE GAME
j First Downs
' Michigan, 7; Illinois, 8.
j Yards Gained From Rushing
| Michigan, 125; Illinois, 133.
I Forward Passes Attempted
j Michigan, 11; Illinois, 18.
jPasses Completed
I Michigan, 2; Illinois, 4.
j Passes Intercepted
I By Michigan, 4; by Illinois, 2.
i Yards Gained On Passes
j Michigan, 35; Illinois, 40.

_
i
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OUR BEST INSTRUCTORS WILL LEAVE THE UNIVERSITY
IF PROPOSED SPY SYSTEM IS ADOPTED, SAYS VAN TYNE

"When I opened The Daily
Thursday morning I thought Mich-
igan had suffered another defeat.
The headlines were as ostentatious
as if you were blazoning a victory
by Wisconsin. Instead, I discovered
that the triumph was the proposed
establishment of a spy system over
the instructors of the University.
Men were to be secretly chosen by
the Student Council, who would re-
port anonymously on the good and
bad points of their instructors, and
these valuable judgments were to
be used by the administration in
determining promotions. The public
was given to understand that not
only the President, but Dr. Ruthven,
Dean of Administration, and Dr.
C. S. Yoakum favored this amazing
plan. I know positively that Dr.
Ruthven does not approve of it, and
I have the word of a friend in
whom I have absolute faith that
Dr. Yoakum is opposed to it. I
doubt very much whether President
Little favors it. I expected a denial
next morning, but instead there was
an editorial defending the ideaI
with what looked to me like soph-
omoric logic," said Prof. C. H. Van

structor's rank are teaching fresh-
men? Do you value the judgment
of men just out of high school on
the merits of university men? High
school standards are one thing;
university standards are another.
"The glad hand artist, the good
mixer, the instructor easy to bluff,
the facile entertainer who does not
know his subject but who has
clever ways of making the class
hours pass pleasantly-such un-
worthy climbers would show up
well on the freshman questionnaire.
But would the faithful instructor
who works his students hard, se-
lects from his subject the serious
problems, hard to grasp without
earnest mental application, and
who trains his students as if he
were a football trainer responsible
for their fitness for the big game,
get his dues on the questionnaire?
I think not. Competent judgment
is available to the administration
through the older professors who
visit classes occasionally," Prof. Van
Tyne continued. "If, as you sal,
promotions are made as a result of
guess work, it is a reflection on the
head, and the remedy would be to

I

Georgia Tech 32, Oglethorpe 7.
Nebraska 20, Kansas 0.
Haskell 7, Washington 0.
Southern Methodist 6, Texas 2.
Iowa State 13, Oklahoma 0.
Northwestern 10, Minnesota 9.
Wisconsin 15, Alabama 0.
Pennsylvania 20, Chicago 13.

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BIG TEN STANDINGS

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