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November 01, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-01

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1928

Published every morning except Monday
during the Universit year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member f Western Conference Editorial
Assnciation
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
c6tled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the pnstoffce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4. 50.
Offices: Ann Arbo: Press Building, May.'
nard Stree.
Priones: Editorial, 4925;. BusMesi, 221..
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor.>....................Paul J. Kern
City Editor .............. .Nelson J Smith
News Editor...........Richard C. Kurvink
Sports'Editor...............Morris Quinn
Women's Editor .............Sylvia S. Stone
Editor Michigan Weekly.... J. Stewart Hooker
Music and Drama......... .R. L. Askren
Assistant City Editor. Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
Clarence N. Edelson Charles S. Monroe
Joseph E. Howell Pierce Ro- nberg
onald J. Klinc George . Simons
George C. Tilley
Reporters
Paul T,. Adams C.. A. Lewis
Morris Alexander Marian MacDonald
Esther Anderson Henry Merry
C. A. Askren N. S. Pickard
Bertram Askwith Victor Rabinowitz
Louisq Behymer Anne Schell
Arthur Bernstein Rachel Shearer
Seton C. Bovee Robert Silbar
Isabel Charles Howard Simon
L. R. Chubb Robert L. Sloss
Frank E. Cooper Arthur R. Strubel
Helen Domine Edith Thomas
Douglas Edwards Beth Valentine
Valborg Egelan d Gurney Williams
Robert J. Feldman Walter Wilds
Marjorie Follmer George E. Wohlgemuth
William Gentrv Robert SWoodroofe
Lawrence Hartwig Toseph A. Russell
Richard Jung Cadwell Swansont
Charles R. Kaufman A. Stewarta;
Ruth Kelsey Edward L. Warner Jr.
Donald E. Layman Cleland Wyllie
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
Advertising...............Alex K. Scherer
Advertising.............A. James Jordan
A dvertising........Carl W. Hammer
Service.... . . . ...Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation...............George S. Bradley
Accounts..... ..Lawrence E. Walkley
Publications..........:... Ray M. Hofelich
Assistants
Irving Binzer Jack Horwich
Donald Blackstone Dix Humphrey
Mary Chase ' Marion Kerr
Jeanette Dale Lillian Kovinsky
Vernor Davis Bernard Larson,
Bessie Egeland Leonard Littlejohn
Helen Geer. Hollister Mabley
Ann !Goldberg Jack Rose
Kasper Halverson Carl F. Schemm
George Hamilton Sherwood Upton
Agnes Herwig Marie Wellstead
Walter Yeagley
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1928
Night Editor-CHAS. S. MONROE

OUR FRIEND, THE ENEMY
Ten years ago, it would have been OASTED ROLL
impossible forthe speaker onto- PA ED 0!
night's Oratorical association pro- r
gram to hold the stage. But that THE POLITE
was ten years ago, and now in 1928 LANDLADY
the University body and citizens of NEVER OFFENDS
Ann Arbor will tonight greet Count "I didn't raise my daughter to
Felix von Luckner, who during thesaormy," ugre t
World War commanded a German sleep in a dormitory, shrieked the
sea-raider which spread terror frantic Ann Arbor landlady
among allied shipping, Count Luck- through Governor Green's front
ner is perhaps the first German windowyesterday.
veteran to gain recognition in this
country, and even more, is one of * * *
the few men in history who have "We understand the Univer-
been able to secure admir.tion and sity's attitude in this matter
attention in a nation against whieh thoroughly," wailed E. Nuisance
they fought. Browne, head of a list of terri-
Count Luckner, however, is a re- fied townspeople resenting the
Markable man. His entire career as proposed building plan to put
a sea raider was marked by a de- co-eds in all the hot water
gre of humanitarianism which has they want. "But the idea will
never before been equalled in sea spoil the best graft that the
history. To sink 17 ships and townspeople have had: from the
take 100 prisoners without injury tudns fo r h e last ninty
in the slightest degree to any is an students for the last ninety
accomplishment that none has years."-
ever approached. When he arrived * *
in New York recently, three cap- We understand that there is a
tains whose vessels he had sunk convict ship at Yale. What's the
greeter him and thanked him for trouble? Auto ban violators, at
his kindly treatment to them during Yale, too?
their internment. * *
Luckner, it appears, is the kind of Modern Nursery Rhyme
war hero that nations need. He
was one who fought courageously Co-ed Bo-peepi
for his own side and yetrrecognized Has lost much sleep
the rights of the other. His ad- And looks quite wan and weary.
ventures rival any that have ap- The federal men
peared in rough paper magazines; He rfedral en
and his were entirely true. Only Have raided her den
once in a lifetime, if at all, does And gotten themselves all bleary.
such a man who command such re- Oscar.
spect appear. He is typical of the * * *
seadogs that adventure-lovers have The fact that Ann Arbor has
admired for centuries. more phone calls per capita than
The Oratorical association is any other city in the United States
opening their program with a dis- is not due to the fact that students
tinctive offering. Luckners are all are industrious, nor is it due to the
too few. The audience tonight will fact that students are lazy, nor is it
undoubtedly have a chance to have det h facts that students arelaynoist
dreams come true-a real, live sea- due to the facts that students are
dog and hero at last. efficient. , Not any of it. It's Just
Lark trying to get dates.
Wednesday's paper tells us of a
new artificial larnyx to restore o o
speech to the Dumb. My, my, what Should she wait for the1
a business it should have at local 1 choice of her heart, whom they
sororities! may bring back in chains, or
-oshould she accept the hand of
We paused to light a cigarette in- the successful suitor, though
side the door of Mason hall the her very soul crys out in pro-
other day. One of those professors test?
of refuse removal grabbed our What would YOU do in the
arm and shouted, "What's yr cs fMr od
name? Didntcha see that sign?" e case of Mary Gold?
0 0
. . .*, * *
Campus Opinion We asked you, Mr. T. Hawley
Contributors are asked to be brief, Tapping, do we get that compli-
confining themselves to less than 300 mentary ticket to the banquet
words it possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The, given by the Washington alumni

II

_ _ __ _ ..

Music And Drama

i

Detroit Theaters

r. .

i

TONIGHT: Comedy Club pre-
sents Sardou's succe u'
"meller,""Dire- "
Mimes theatren

* * *
IN DETROIT
With such imposing theatrical
fireworks in Ann Arbor as the The-.
ater Guild's production of "Porgy"
and Comedy Club's thrill - ,Dplo-
macy," Detroit theater business
seems rather pale and colorless.
"Porgy" scored a universal success
with the cosmic sweep of its pagen-
try which left no energy at all for
criticism, and the Comedy Club ef-
fort is so sincere and successful and
in reproducing the heavy atmos-
phere of diplomatic intrigue before
which a fascinating love drama is"
portrayed, that interest in the Mo-
tor City's offerings naturally suf-
fers. However, there are a number
of things of note.
At the Detroit Civic theatre, for-
merly the Bonstelle Playhouse, Vera
Allen, Miss Bonstelle's beauti ful and
capable importation from New
York for this season, is handl-
ing the Ethel Barrymore part of
Madame, the surgeon's wife, in W.
Somerset Maugham's glittering
comedy of marital affairs, "The
Constant Wife." Playing in a fas-
cinating vein of ironic comedy,
Miss Barrymore scored one of her
most important successes as the
wife who wittily turns the tables of
fidelity on her husband. Miss Al-
len, playing the first sympathetic
role she has had since the season
opened, seems according to all re-
ports to be giving a splendid inter-
pretation.
In the special special, a revival
of Sutton Vane's "Outward Bound,"
Miss Bonstelle will make one of her
infrequent appearances next Wed-
nesday evening when she plays the
part of "Miss Midget."
At the Cass theater Arthur Ham-
merstein's musical success, "Golden
Dawn," continues for the remaind-
er of this week and all of next week.
Opening in Detroit last spring, its
success then forecast the approval
it would meet with in New York.
Its appearance now, stamped with
the badge of metropolitan approval,
guarantees a delightful evening of
popular music with a story set in
the exotic color of Africa.
"Nobody's Girl," at the Shubert
Lafayette, features a rather un-
usual plot in which the tomboy
heroine seems at first not to have
Someone to do the conventional
romantic musical comedy business
with until, in the last act, Nobody,
in the person of John Novak, plays
protagonist to the versatile Ilse
Marvenga. The score is by William
Ortmann, well known Detroit musi-
cian and composer.
A POOR PLAY. BUT GOOD
ENTERTAINMENT
Review by Paul L. Adams
Heavily handicapped by a deci-
dedly mediocre play, Comedy Club
nevertheless furnished a very en-
tertaining evening for the small
crowd that attended their perform-
ance of "Diplomacy" last evening.
Throughout the first two acts,
preparatory material weakened the
play terribly with obvious exposi-
tory speeches and slow building up
of the complications; but, in the
third and fourth acts, when the ac-
tors were given a chance, they gave
a really fine interpretation of this
rather out-of-date melodrama.
The play itself is certainly not
to be recommended although it
still has a certain amount of kick
in it from the point of view of plot
but the plot so obviously cramps
the characters and limits them
that its tricky -turns are hardly a
compensation.
Although the cast did nobly as
a whole, several of the minor
characters deserve special mention
for their work which was excep-
tional. Among these are Leone
Lee as Mion, and George Johnson
and Elizabeth McCurdy in the role
of the Fairfazes who furnish the
comedy relief. The humorousness

of the latter was so good, that, al-
though the parts have absolutely no

CA33 THEATRE
P --Nights $1 to $3.85; Wed.
to $2; Sat. Mat. $1-$2.50
'RTHUR HAMMERSTEIN
"Golden Dawn"

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS
auspices
MATINEE MUSICALE
Leo Ornstein and Hartmann String Quartet...........Nov. 6
Jacques Gordon String Quartet.................Dec. 12
Pro Arte Quartet of Belgium.................. ...Feb. 5
Malkin Trio... ...........................March19
MIMES THEATRE

SHUBERT
LAFAYETTE
"Nobody's Girl"
Evenings, 75c, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00,
$2.50, $3.00
Thurs. Mat. 50c to $2.00; Sat.
Mat. 50c to $2.50
Want Ads Pay

11

No Single Admissions

Course $5.00

'4
:y
zS
wF

Read the Classified Ads

i

.. .

MRS. C. W. MERKEL
Proprietress

MR. T. JULIAN HODGSON, JR.
Steward

I

Cutting Cafe

Mat.
2- R AE

Nite
'7--9

Corner Monroe and State Streets
ANNOUNCES

Telephone 8347

THE HOME OF
GOOD MOTION
PICTURES.

A REDUCTION IN RATES

ONE WEEK with breakfast,.
ONE WEEK without breakfast

. . $7.00
. . $6.00

ft, A

Private Rooms and Service Available for Groups of 8, 10, or 12
Effective Immediately

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SPO Q A ITY
&A'I ? i1

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iV-
R egi
Reg
Reg

Q~'UALITY. S
a a, 0

SPECIAL SALE OF

ALL-METAL WASTE PAPER BASKETS

:,,

ular Value ..
ular Value .
ular Value.

..........50c
..........75c
.90c

Special...
Special .. .
Special.

.33c
.49c
.68c

Others up to $1.50

Oil Heating Stoves-just the thing for these
evenings and mornings. Prices from $6.25 to $
Electric Heaters-$4.75, $5.00 and $7.50
FIRE PLACE FIXTURES
Coal Hods and Fire Side Baskets from $5.00 to $12.50
Coal Grates.......$5.50 up to $12.50 Fire Place Sets.....$5.00 up
Screens...........$4.50 up of $25.00 Andirons..........$5.00 up

cold
11.50.

to
to

$25.00
$25.00

S
4 _
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Jno. C. Fischer Co.

SHECKELS FOR THE A. A.
The Athletic association owes a
distant debt to the student body.
When football games are being
played fort the glory of Michigan
and the replenishment of the
association's coffers, the student
body provides the team. It is the
student body, also that rallies in
support of the team and provides
much of the atmosphere in the
stadium that paying patrons come
miles to experience and to be a part
of.
Without a student body there
would be no football games, and
therefore we submit that the stu-
dents are entitled to'some consid-
eration when the pasteboards are
assigned through the officeof the
association.
We also recognize that there are
certain obligations that the associ-
ation owes to ,Michigan alumni.
Friends of the University have
made possible the erection of our
new stadium-a logical, forward
step in the development of ath-
letics here that deserves universal
commendation. To these friends,
occasionally but not grudgingly re-
ferred to as "bloated bondholders,"
we concede preference in ticket dis-
tribution.
Nor do we attach any stigma to
the name of Harry Tillotson, busi-
ness manager of the Athletic associ-
ation, who finds it among his sev-
eral duties to supervise the sale of
tickets. It is not his fault that
four-year men on the campus are
still sitting around the corners of
the stadium. He is forwarding the
policy of the association to keep as
voluminous as possible a stream of
shekles dropping in the coffer,.
and the shekels, it is realized, are
chiefly forthcoming from persons'
not enrolled in the University.
Against this policy we point our
jeremiad. We hold that good seats
should be given to bondholders,
members of the M-club, and mem-
bers of the team. But we fail
signally to see why the student
body, according to the number of
their years on the campus, should
not be next in preference.
HUGHES AND PROHIBITION
Charles E. Hughes, aged, experi-
enced, and dignified, has entered2
the political arena, with staunch(
statements as to the effect of thei
presidential election next Tuesday.
Governor Smith's election, he
says, would lead to "far greater

names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
TO THE LANDLADIES
It was with a great deal of dis-
gust and no little amusement that
I read yesterday's headlines,
"Rooming House Owners Oppose
New Dormitory." It was with even
more amusement that I read the
1 reason offered by the petitioners.
It is obviously true that the real
estate investments of the owners
will be jeopardized by the erection
of the dormitory. But it is also
obviously true that the realization
of a long-planned and long-hoped-
for building-the necessity of which
is so imminent-cannot be defer-
red for so selfish a desire on the
part of these owners.
It is appreciated by both the fac-
ulty and the student body that
these property owners are depen-
dent -for their existence on their
real estate and the renting of their
houses. But do not the owners
themselves realize that had they, in
the past, presented to the students.
the privileges and comforts which
are so essential, there would have
been no immediate necessity for a
dormitory?
"We feel that there are certain
rights and safeguards to which the
property owners of the city are en-
titled, and for that reason we ask
for an investigation to determine
if such a move as that suggested is
the best one from all angles."-to
quote Mr. N. E. Brown. The answer
to that is so apparent as to be sim-
ple. Of course such a move is not
the best from all angles. It is not
best from THEIR angle. Yet "they
have no desire to be unfair" . . But
are they not being outrageously un-
fair? Deprive us students of a dor-,
mitory, in order that property own-
ers might continue to accept our
money, grow fat on us in exchange
for the privilege of living in their
unsatisfactory houses!
And they "consider it only right f
that they should know exactly what
is happening." It is to laugh . .
What is happening is this: The
officials are actively working out
something that has been talked
over and quibbled over long enough.
There will be a decrease in the de-
mand for the houses, and the own-
ers will no longer be able to extert
unreasonable prices for their rooms.
That is all.
I do not believe that any intelli-
gent official would or could grant

after the Navy game?
Who Said We Enjoyed Them?
Dear Lark:. Since you seem
to enjoy nursery rhymes, how
' do you like these. I think there
is no copyright:
Mary, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
But Mary was a tough little girl,
And said, "Who the hell wants
to know?"
Little Miss Theta sat on a Beta
On a bench in the Arboreta,
When along came a Phi Gam
and sat down beside 'em
And said, "Don't you know it's
'a waste of time
I To teach a Theta to neck?"
Poison Ivy.
* *.*
Dr. Wilce, coach of the Ohio State
eleven, is seeking a substitute for
his star lineman; Raskowski. We
suggest, Dr. Wilce, that you take
four feet of reinforced concrete, six
feet high and plunk it right down
in the Ohio line between left end
and guard. Then, Coach Doctor
Wilce, you'll have a substitute for
Raskowski.
The Matter Is Trivial; What Would
YOU Do In The Case Of
Mary Gold?
Dear Lark: Are you too
snooty to let a frail femme
crash your line? (Editor's
Note: Yes!)
Ever since my arrival to this
place of dedicated to higher
education a deep question has
distressed me exceedingly. As
you are undoubtedly of the
intelligentsia (Editor's Note:
No, no!), I thought you might
be able to relieve my mind.
Did the Michigan men cause
the song, "My Michigan Man"
or does the song account for the
men? Or is it a case of which
came first, the hen or the egg?
Anxiously awaiting the
speech of the oracle (Editor's
Note: The oracle was a wom-
an!)
Wis Jane.
* * *
Cora. Please Take Note

& 01 0

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TO THE
MICHIGAN DAILY ?
All Subscriptions of $4.00 not paid by November 15th
advance to $4.50. After December 1st, all unpaid
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HOUSE MANAGERS
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i

reason for being in the play as con-
tributing to the situation, the playj
would be dull without them. Miss
Lee, as the maid, made the very
most of a light role, and stood out
as one of the most finished per-
formers of the evening.
Robert Adams turned in a con
sistant performance of high grade.
The work of Lillian Selchel, was
exceptionally fine in the third act,
and charming throughout although
she was not always wholly effec-
tive in the tragic situations.
Lorinda McAndrews, Thurston
Thieme, and George Priehs, al-
though they stalked the bdards
during the first two acts like Ham-
let's ghost, were really good in the
latter portion of the play. Miss!
McAndrews had a very difficult
part to be anything but grotesque
in, and she is to be commended for
her success in making it as least
partially acceptable to the audi-
ence.
Charles Peake made a very hand-
some hero, but his dramatic ability

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