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September 27, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JESTABLISHED
1890

I r

It

4,

MEMBERI
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

EIGHT PAGES

ol. XXIX, No. 4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER.27, 1928

. i
tt ;.

I

MILLIOS OF 0DOLARS
ASKED BY RED CROSS
FOR HELP IN FLORiDA
GENERAL APPEAL ISSUED FROM
STRICKEN DISTRICT TO
NATION AT LARGE

MEMBERSHIP DANCES AT UNION
BEGIN AGAIN TOMORROW NIGHT

CREMATION

Is,

EMPLOYEDI

Funeral Fires In Some Parts Of
State Cast Ghostly Pall Over t
Countrysidec
Twelve million dollars has been
asked by the American Red Cross
as a donation for the alleviation
of the tragic situation in Floridat
according to a report issued yes-;
terday from the national head-
quarters of the society at Wash-t
ington. The sum is to be subscrib-
ed by the American people and will I
be used for the permanent re-e
habilitating of the devastated sec-
4ion.
Funeral fires cast a ghostly
aspect over some sections of the
Everglades last night as the bodies
of those killed in the storm were
cremated by workers. It was ne-
cessary to resort to cremation
methods for sanitary reasons fol-
lowing the recent period of storm
and flood. It was reported that onI
Tuesday alone over 165 bodies were1
burned in the Belle Glade section.
Many Lose Everything 1
The appeal to the Red Cross was
made in a formal report by the
Palm Beach county chapter of the
total number of dead, placing it
"in excess of 2,300" and the num-
ber of refugees at well over 12,000
who lost everything in the blow
and subsequent flood of Lake
Okeechobee.4
The citizens of the districts af-
fected have shown remarkable zeall
and cooperation in the restoration
of order, while plans for the relief
of the situation are being rapidly
worked out..
Heavy rains and intermittent
showers added to the discomfort
of the residents and workers, who
in many cases had not even time
to rebuild the roofs which had
been blown from their houses.
Witnesses Describe Scenes
The situation has been described
as a complete and awful tragedy1
by witnesses and petitions for
funds for the organization of re-
ilef work have been pouring daily
into the local chapters of the Red
ross.
InJacksonville, Gov. John Mar-1
tin, who has just completed a tour
of inspection of the storm area,1
has issued a call for the people of I
the state and the country at large
to "give till it hurts.".i
Survivors Are Hopeful
Hope was held out at Lake
Worth and at Palm Beach that the
water which inundated the coun-
tryside was gradually receding and
that the Palm Beaches would prob-
ably not feel the result of the
storm during the coming winter
resort seasons.I
According to a report received at
'washngton from Porto Rico, ap-
proximately 225 persons w er e
killed as a result of the storm and
over 1,150 were injured and made
homeless here.
TH RE E CAPA CIT Y
GAMES PROBABLE.
SAYS TILLOTSONI
Sellouts of the football tickets
for three Big Ten games at the
Michigan stadium this fall are ex-
pected by Harry Tillotson, business
manager of the University Athletic
association, he announced today.
These games are the Illinois, Wis-
consin, and Iowa games.
FIn general the tickets are going1
fast, according to Mr. Tillotson.
Despite lean prospects for a win-
ning eleven apparently as many
people as ever will be on hand to
watch the Wolverines perform this
fall.,
A sellout for the Illinois game

was early thought possible, but
sellouts on the Iowa and Wiscon-
sin games, which reports have
practically assured, come as a sur-
prise.
BOXING TRYOUTS
ASKED TO REPORT

Friday and Saturday night Un-
ion membership dances will be
held again this year as last begin-i
ning tomorrow night in the Unioni
ballroom, it was announced yes-I
terday by William E. Nissen, '29,
president of the Union.1
The Paul Omer-Don Loomis or-
chestra which played at all Union
dances last year is returning in-
tact this fall after spending the
summer playing in Ohio, Indiana,
and Michigan cities. Incidentally
it is the first Union dance orches-
tra to return to Ann Arbor un-
changed after a summer on the
road.j
During the first part of thej
summer the orchestra played one
week stands in Columbus, Cincin-
nati, and Dayton, and then moved.
to Michigan City for a six weeks1
engagement. The balance of the1
summer was spent playing in
Pittsburgh.'In each of these cities1
the organization either preceded-
or succeeded orchestras of nation-
al repute such as those of Ted
Weems, Dan Garber, Charles Dur-
enberger, and Fletcher Harrison.
It will consist of ten men thisI
fall with "Bill" Suthers out in
front directing.rThe double piano
feature inaugurated 1la te last
spring, it is announced, will be a
regular part of the orchestra
throughout the year. The orches-
tra directors also aver thatrthey
have several new special numbers
ready for Union dancers.
The side porches off from the
ballroom, according to Nissen, have
been closed in, repaired, and are
ready for use. A new indirect,
lighting system has also been in-
stalled and will be an added fea -
ture.
UNION PERATRYOUT
RESUME DALY WORK,
Positions Still Open for All Types
of Opera Work; 125 Have
Aiready Reported
COMMITTEES BEGIN WORK
Tryouts for the 1928 Michigan
Union Opera are continuing daily
at the Mimes theater at four
o'clock, accordin'g to E. Mortimer
Shutter, and any men who have
not yet appeared for try-out work
for any of the positions on cast,
chorus, or committee work may
still do so this week at that time
and place. More than 125 students
have already signified their desire
to do work for the coming show,
Shutter said, and the total is ex-
pected to be considerably higher
before the week is over.
The work this week for the chor-
uses consists in rehearsing the old
men and training the new men
in the many routines devised by
Roy Hoyer, former leading juven-
ile with Fred Stone and now play-
ing the lead with Schubert's, "To
the Queen's Taste." Hoyer was in
Ann Arbor for a month last spring
and worked out many new ideas
with those in charge of the Opera.
In addition Shutter conferred with
Hoyer during the summer and it is
understood that additional plans
were made at that time for origin-
ality and newness in the 1928
opera.
Finishing touches are now being
added to the musical scores for
the new production. Much work
was done along these lines this
summer by those who are writing
the music. The nature of the
music as well as the names of
gthose writing ithave not yet been
divulged by Shutter, who stated,
however, that the music will not
follow in any way the conventional
types of music previously used in
collegiate productions.

In addition, committee work is
getting under way, although def-
inite committees have not yet been
Ichosen.

Dance hours will be the same
as previously, from 9' to 1 o'clock
on Friday night and from 9 to 12
o'clock on Saturday night. Tickets
for Friday night dances will go on
sale at 5 o'clock on Wednesday in
the Union lobby and tickets for
Saturday night dances will go on
sale at 5 o'clock on Thursday aft-
ernoon each week.
Almost 12,000 couples or nearly
24,000 people participated in the
membership dances on Friday and
Saturday nights during last year,
Nissen stated.
This figure is especially interest-
ing when one remembers that five
of the all-University dances were
also held in the ball room last
year. Of this group, the pan-
hellenic ball and the sophomore
prom were held in the fall; and
the military ball, the frosh frolic,
and the senior ball were held in
the spring.
NOTED MUSICIAN ADDS
VOLUMES TO LIBRARY1

Music Collection Enlarged By
of Complete Edition of
Mozart's Works

Gift

W. W. HINSHAW IS DONORj
Twenty-five bound volumes, the
complete musical works' of Wolf-
gang Amedeus Mozart, famous
German composer of the early
classical period, are among the
latest acquisitions of the Univer-
sity library. They are the gift of
William Wade Hinshaw, Metropoli-
tan opera singer and director of
the Hinshaw opera company, and
will fill a gap on the shelves de-
voted to music.
The edition just acquired was
printed by Breitkopf and Haertel
of Leipsic, Germany, and is not
only the most all-inclusive edi-
tion in existence, but is unique be-
tause it is free from the compli-
cated additions and emendations
which are so often the result of
an editor's work upon a master-
piece. The scores are printed just
as Mozart wrote them.
Hinshaw some time ago in-
formed William W. Bishop, Univer-
sity librarian, of his desire to make
a gift to the library, and after
some correspondence with Prof.
Earl V. Moore, musical director of
the School of Music, the Mozart
volumes were selected as the most
worth-while addition to the library
music collection. Upon their ar-
rival from Germany theywere
sent' to the bindery in the base-
ment of the library and made into
handsome volumes.
This gift makes the collection
fairly complete, and some very val-
uable source material for students
of the history of music is now
available for their use, according
to Professor Moore. The collec-
tion includes the works of Pales-
trina, Bach, Haydn, Handel, Bee-
thoven, Schubert, Schuman, Liszt,
Brahms, and Chopin, and is kept
in a special section of the library
stacks.
SAYS LEAGUE IS
INSECURE IN ASIA
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, Sept. 26.-A warning
that while the League ofuNations
is firmly established in Europe its
condition in Asia is not assured
was given the delegates of the
League of Nations assembling dur-
ing the closing moments today by
the Earl of Lytton, British states-
man, who spoke for India. The
delegates of 50 nations who started
for their homeland tonight with
the ninth assembly a matter of
history, were plainly thoughtful as
the result of his speech.

FARMERS MILL VOTE
FORSMITH AND FAR
RELIEF, SAYS FRAZIER
DISCONTENT IS WIDESPREAD
IN WHEAT BELT,
HE AVERS
HAS TALK WITH HOOVER
Mondel Declares That Smith Has
Lost Rather Than Gained
by Western Tour
WASHINGTON, Sept. 26.-A de-
cidedly unfavorable report of the
political situation in the north-
western wheat belt was brought to
Herbert Hoover today by Senator
Lynn J. Frazier, of North Dakota,
after the Republican presidential
candidate had received encourag-
ing news from such widely separ-
ated states as Wyoming and Flor-
ida.
Frazier, a Republican member of
the Progressive group in the Sen-
ate, who has endorsed Hoover's
candidacy, said that the situation
in North Dakota was far from
satisfactory and that there was
discontent among the farmers. He
added that his information was
that a similar situation existed in
South Dakota, Montana, and Min-
nesota.
"There is likely to be a big pro-
test vote in my state," he said, aft-
er his conference with the nom-
inee. "The Republicans have been
promising farm relief for years
and with my people farm relief is
synonymous with the McNary-
Haugen bill.
"I cannot believe that Gov.
Smith will carry the state, but
there is much discontent with
wheat prices low. Some say the
Democratic nominee has a good
chance in Montana, South Dako-
ta, and Minnesota as well as in
my state. I do not know." Frank
W. Mondel, a former representa-
tive from Wyoming, who called up-
on the candidate during the day,
expressed belief that Gov. Smith
had lost more votes than he had
gained from his sally into the
west.
"If we concede that a consider-
able number of votes in the west
were in doubt when the Demo-
cratic candidate started his tour
and that the winning of those
votes was the object of his trip,"
Mondel said, "we are forced to
conclude by reports from the west
that he has not benefited any
from his speeches."
TRYOUTS SOUGHT
9Y CHORAL UNION
Tryouts for the choral union will
continue from 4:15 to 5 o'clock to-
day and tomorrow at the School
of Music, according to an an-
nouncement by Earl V. Moore of
the School of Music, musical di-
rector. All students, including
freshmen, are eligible for this ac-
tivity, and prospective candidates
are urged to report as soon as pos-
sible to permit arrangements to be
completed before the first number
of the concert series on October 10.
All members of the Choral Union
receive complimentary tickets to
all the concerts in the series. Re-
hearsals are held one hour per
week throughout the year, the men
on Tuesday nights and the women
on Thursday nights. Old members
ar also asked to report and fill
out a registration card.
WEATHER

Weather Forecast-Lower Michi-
gan, unsettled with local showers
Thursday and possibly Friday;
continued cool.

Practical business experience in-
cluding work in advertising, sales-
manship, bookkeeping, and ac-1
counting, as well as exceptional
journalistic opportunities in any
one of a wide variety of fields with
excellant possibilities of upperstaff
appointments on any one of three
major publications are open to sec-
ond semester freshmen and sopho-I
mores who try out for one of the
publications this fall.
The Michiganensian, annual
publication of the senior class, the
Gargoyle, monthly campus humor
magazine, and The Michigan Daily,
campus newspaper, appearing
every morning except Monday, are
the three major campus publica-
tions.
Each publication, has two dis-
tinct staffs and offices. One is
known as the editorial staff and
offers direct editorial experience;
COPENHAGE[N REACHED
BY ROCKFORD FLYERS
Hassell and Cramer Greeted In
Denmark; Expedition Escorted
By Prof. W. H. Hobbs
TO TRY AGAINNEXT YEAR
(By Associated Press)
COPENHAGEN, Sept. 26.-Bert
Hassell, and Parker Cramer, pilots
of the airplane "Greater Rockford"
in which they intended to fly from
Illinois to Sweden via Greenland,

the other is referred to as the busi-
ness staff and carries the entire
problem of financing the publica-
tion.
Work in the business offices of
each publication is largely the
same, although in each case the
problem is somewhat different. All
three business staffs have unusual-
ly small number of sophomores
working with them at present
which means that there is very
little competition for next year's
upper staff positions.
On the editorial side of the pub-
lications, a wide range of experi-
ence is offered. The 'Ensian offers,
what is generally considered one of
the three best college annuals in'
the country. It offers an excep-
tional chance for students inter-
ested in photography as well as to
those interested in other fields of
journalistic experience.
Additional opportunities for stu-'
dents interested in writing humor
or in publishing cartoons are of-
fered on the Gargoyle editorial'
staff which once a month supplies
the campus with its humor maga-
zine.
The Daily, covering the campusJ
each day offers practical experi-'
ence in newspaper work upon one
of the finest college dailies. In
addition to experience in reporting,!
it offers opportunities for editorial
and critical writing as well as ac-
tual work in make up and news-
paper management.
Students interested in trying out
for either staff of either of the'
three publications should reportI
between 3 and 5o'clock any after-
noon at the office of that staff in
the Press biliding on Maynard

1]
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7

MAJOR STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
CALL FOR SOPHOMORE TRYOUTS

were greeted and praised on their street. 3
arrival here today. They were ac-3
companied from the north by Pro- j
fessor William H. Hobbs, leader ofW
the University of Michigan Green-
land observation party which res-x
cued them after they had landed 'UBLICATION OF YEAR
far from their objective in the -_
northern country. First Number to Make AppearanceI
"I wish my wife and three kid- Wednesday, October Third,
dies were here," said Hassell, as It Is Announced
he landed from the Steamer Ful-
bon. He was happy but plaWly ILL BE MUCH MPROVE
homesick, yet he announced that L
he and Cramer would make an- With the first official meeting of
other attempt to span the great The Michigan Weekly staff set for
circle route next year.-Mn.s.
"The trip taught us that Green- 4 o'clock this afternoon in the Press
land is a natural relay station for !building, plans are rapidly going
air travels between America and forward for the publication of the
Europe," he said. "It contained first issue which, it is announced,
excellent landing places that can -1
not be spoiled by climatic condi- will appear on Wednesday, Octob
tions in, summer or winter. er 3.
"Next year Cramer and I are Beginning its second year as a
going from Rockford to Copen- publication, although still continu-
hagen via Greenland and Iceland ing as an off spring of The Daily,
and back. This route is preferable The Weekly will have many new
to a direct flight across the A$- changes and improvements over
iantic because the latter demands the publication of last year.
too much gasoline cargo space at Whereas last year, it consisted
the expense of passenger capacity. entirely of stories reprinted from {
"Our machine was not damaged The Daily, under the plans an-
on landing but subsequent storms nounced for this fall a staff has.
played havoc with it. I still hope been organized which will write
to save the motor and the scien- all of The Weekly copy .with the
tific instruments. particular viewpoint of the outsider
'Unfortunately we . lost all the being considered in every story.
mail we were carrying, including In this way it is felt that The1
letters for the Royal Swedish fam- Weekly will have a wider appeal I
ily. They were buried with the than previously and that it will as
machine under the snow." a consequence'prove of greater in-
terest to the parent and alumni
GENERALS PLEDGE groups which must of necessity
SUPPORT TO GIL make up its reading public.
The Weekly is designed primarily'
MEXICO CITY, Sept. 26.-Tele- to be sent home to the parents of
grams from military chieftans, be- Michigan students. As its name1
gan to come in tonight, pledging implies, it is published weekly. Its
support to Emilio PortespGl ias news is carefully selectednwith the!
provisional president-elect. He re- parent viewpoint and interest in
ceived. many other felicitations mind; and its chief function is to
during the day from all parts of keep the fathers and mothers of
Mexico and abroad. students in Ann Arbor acquainted
An official decree was present in a general way with campusI
today ordering that "citizen attor- news.
ney Portes Gil will present him- Students who have not as yet
self in Congress at noon, November subscribed may do so by mailing
30, to take oath of office. ",It was their orders to The Michigan
signed by President Calles and by Weekly, Press building, or by call-
Portes Gil himself, as secretary of ing at the business office of The
the Interior. Daily.

NEW COUNCIL -FAVORS
AICTION TO OVERCOM1E
DRINKING AT PARTIES
MOTION INSPIRED BY LETTER
TO STUDENT BODY FROM
PRESIDENT LITTLE
KERN SELECTS CIAIRMEN
Cheering Section Committee Says
There Are About 100
Seats Remaining

Last night at the opening meet-
ing of the student council for the
current year, the drinking question
was considered and the council
voted to support any reasonable
action the University administra-
tion may take. The motion as
passed read, "That the council will
support any reasonable action to
abolish drinking at fraternity par-
ties, provided that each house
president be adequately notified
by Dean Bursley."
Communication Received
The motion came as a result of
an informal communication from
President Clarence Cook Little to
the council requesting its opinion
on measures for the prevention of
drinking at fraternity parties. The
council held that a large number
of fraternities, innocent of viola-
tions, are suffering penalties for
the mis-conduct of members of a
minority group of houses.
Discussed Cheering Section
Richard S. Spindle, '29E, report-
ing for the cheering section com-
mittee, announced that 100 of the
1,200 cheering section seats now re-
main to be sold. These may be
obtained any day this week upon
application at the Administration
building on Ferry field, and pro-
vision has been made for those who
have already sent in their regular
applications to exchange those
seats for cheering section seats if
they wish.
Councilman John Gilmartin,
'29E, was appointed by Paul J.
Kern, '29, president of the council
to handle elections this fall, and
to prepare a schedule of meetings
to be subnmitted next week at the
regular council meeting.
Robert Warren, '29,'was appoint-
ed to take charge of the Fall games,
set the date, appoint officials, and
organize the teams of the fresh-
man and sophomore classes.
Council Pep Meetings
Williard Lowry, '30, was placed in
charge of Friday night pep meet-
ings before football games, and was
requested to recommend pep meet-
ing dates at the next meeting of
the council. He will arrange for
alumni speakers, and consult with
the Butterfield theaters about free
movies after the meetings.
A suggestion was considered by
the committee to let the J-Hop
committee select its own chairman,
and another proposal was consid-
ered to elect the chairman on a
separate ballot. At present the
committee candidate from the lit-
erary college receiving the most
votes automatically becomes chair-
man one year, and the candidate
from the engineering college re-
ceiving the most votes becomes
chairman the next year.

TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES OFFERED
SENIORS IN SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

GARGOYLE BUSINESS
STAFF TRYOUTS
All first semester sopho-
mores interested in trying out
for the business of the Gar-
goyle are urged to report to
the Gargoyle office in Press
building any day -this week
between hours of 1 to 5 p. m.
Carl Fauster,
Business Manager.

New opportunities to obtain di-
rected practice teaching for seniors
in the School of Education who arej
working for the teacher's certifi-
cate have been arranged for by
that school. Although for. a long
time the seniors have been allowed
to instruct in the University high
school here, they will snow be able
to travel to many of the high
schools in the vicinity of Ann Arbor
and to teachat those places.
. The University will operate a bus'
which will run twice daily between

ing in certain of the co-operating
schools all near Ann Arobr, in such
places as Dexter, Saline, South
Lyons, and others. Students who
secure assignments to these towns.
will be given special permission for
driving their automobiles to and
from centers. Those students who
do their directed teaching in the
co-operating schools will extend
their opportunities throughout the
semester by two periods daily.
The University will continue all
facilities for directed teaching that

FOREIGN STUDENT ROLL
200 HERE REPRESENT
According to recent records of by the or
the Cosmopolitan Club, the Univer- ing a pi
sity of Michigan has attracted stu- program
dents from more different foreign characte
nations this year than in any pre- At the
vious one. There are already reg- be held n
istered in the records of the club at 8 p. m
almost 200 students from some- Little w
thing exceeding 30 countries. China welcomin
has again contributed more stu- Michigan
dents than any other nation, but It has
the list this year is widely and in- nouncet
terestingly varied. There are rep- tion is n
resentatives from such countries as all the
i Amrndnn. Rvrin. Pn1tinPoscftam o

INCREASES:
30 COUNTRIES
rganization. At each meet-
icked nation is to give a
to portray something
ristic of their nationality.
first meeting, which is to
next Saturday in Lane Hall
n., President Clarence Cook
ill give a short address
ng the foreign students to
n.
sbeen requested to an-
that all possible co-opera-
needed in the recording of
foreign students. A new
f- r~o1istration has hen in-

PLANNED MERGER
POSTPONED UNTIL
NEXT SEMESTER
Combination of the Romance
Language departments, the English
departments, and the Mathematics
departments,. of the Literary col-
lege and the Engineering college
has not yet been consumated in
accordance with a motion passed
last April by the Board of Regents,
it was announced today from the
President's office. Due to the fact
that the plans for this semester
were alreadynear completion at
that time, the change was post-
pnd until this fall.
The resolution of the Regents
was "the Board approves the es-
tablishment of University depart-
ments, rather than separate col-
lege departments, in the following
subjects: English, Mathematics,
and Romance Languages. The
chairmanship of each group is to
be lodged in the chairman of the
respective group in the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts."
BURGLARS ENTER
PURDUE HOUSES
rninriaont with the rnhhin of

COUNCIL TO
ELECT IONS

HOLD
SOON

At a special meeting of the Inter-
fraternity Council to be held Tues-
day afternoon, that group will elect
its noffcrs for theconming vear.

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