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October 25, 1928 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-25

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BLISHED
1890

Jipg

Li

4I114

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

e

XXXIX, No. 28.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1928

EIGHT PAGES

..

IUNCIL VOTES DOWNJTHCLPTTO
AITRICAL PETITiON
H RPREENTTIONPRR

P O R G Y' HAS HAD UNUSUAL RUN P flIO GNP DONDMruT
SINCE ITS ORIGINAL PRODUCTION IIIUUIIIIUl~l

PLAY PRODUCTION INVITATIONS
TO BE ISSUED IN NEAR FUTURE

TO HOLD INITIAL PEP
MEETING FRIDAY NIGHT
FOR WISCONSIN GAME

"Porgy," the play about Negroes
that has gained so much pub-
licity and will show next Tuesday
afternoon and night, at the Whit-
ney theater, has had an unusual

CHEERING SECTION ESTIMATE
DECLARED ERRONEOUS
BY SPINDLE
WILL SUPPORT ALUMNUS
Senior Class Elections For School
Of Education Will Be Held
In May This Year
Acting on the petition of the
Boardin Control of the Oratorical
association for an ex-offlici mem-
bership in the Student council, the
council at its regular weekly meet-
ing last night voted against such
addition to its membership.
The association petitioned on the
ground that its activities such as
the annual lecture series, sponsor-
ship of intercollegiate debates, and
management of all local forensic
contests including the extempore
speaking contest, being of an all-
campus nature entitled it to such
ex-officio representation on the
council as is conferred upon the
Union, the Board in Control of
Athletics, and The Daily.
The council vetoed the petition
on the ground that its membership
is sufficiently unwieldy, and that
the Oratorical association is not
of an importance to the campus
proportionate with the Union and
The Daily.
Spindle Reveals Error
A report from Councilman Rich-
ard Spindle, '29E, in charge of the
cheering section, revealed that an
error by the athletic association
in filling ticket applications had
left a block of 58 seats vacant in
the center of the section.
The error was attributed by
Spindle to one of two possible
causes: either that the pink cheer-
ing section card had been over-
looked by clerks in filling applica-
tions, or that students had ne-~
glected to mail in the pink cards
secured when they signed up for
the section.
All. students who applied for
cheering section seats and have re-
ceived, tickets for the Wisconsin
game outside of the section are re-
quested to report this afternoon at
the Administration building on
Ferry field, where an attempt will
be made to straighten out the dif-
ficulty.
After a report by Paul J. Kern,
'29, president of the council, on
special conditions in the School of
Education, the council passed a1
niotion to hold senior class elec-.
tions in that school in May and
jinior elections during the first
week of the fall semester, restoring,
representation on the J-Hop com-
nittee on the condition that the
school cooperate with the council
in holding elections.
Other Action Is Pending
-Action is still pending on the
restoration of a J-Hop representa-
tive to the Medical school. The
J-Hop committeemen of these two
kchools were removed last week for
failure to cooperate with the coun-
eil in holding elections.
Councilman David Wheeler, '29,
veporting on the proposal to- collect
$2 with senior class dues for a
year's subscription to The Michigan
'lumnus, announced that the sen-
ior treasurer of the literary col-
lege had approved the project, but
that treasurers of the senior classes
of the Law and Medical schools
and the engineering college had
turned it down.
Councilman Robert Easterly, '29E,
was appointed to assist in breaking
down the sales resistance of the
engineering college and give the
plan a fair trial on its merits
among those seniors.
Before adjourning the council
voted to acept the returns of the
sophomore literary college election
as determined by the first count.

COOLIDGE GREETS
NEW AMBASSADOR
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 24.-Presi-
dent Coolidge received today at the
White House the new Japanese am-
bassador to Washington, Katsuki,
Debuchni, who presented his cre-
dentials.
The new Jananese ambassador
pointed out that he was the first
ambassador to the United States
that the present Emperor of Japan
had nominated since his ascension
to the throne. The emperor took
this opportunity, the ambassador
said, "of conveying to you in the

career since its original dramatiza-
tion by DuBose and Dorothy Hey-
ward of the former's famous novel
of the same name.
"Porgy" was first published about
three years agoand from the be-
ginning was a favorite. When put
into its dramatized form it was of-
fered to several managers along
Broadway before the Theater Guild
bought it. That was during the
late spring of 1927. Preparations
0- -o
SEAT SALE I
Only balcony and gallery
tickets remain for the night
I performance of "Porgy," but
I seats in all parts of the the-
atre are still available for the I
matinee performance, it was I
I announced yesterday. I

0-

-a

for its production were made dur-
ing the summer and the play open-
ed October 10, 1927. It continued
for consecutive performances
straight on through the months
until April 7, 1928 when it left New
York.
The play was staged by Rouben
Mamoulian, a young Russian-Ar-
menian who had been in America
but two years. Strange as it may
seem, this man, unfamiliar with
the American scene, did so fine a
job on "Porgy" that it resulted in
his almost immediate leap to the
top heap of theatrical directors in
this land.
The premiere of "Porgy" was fol-
lowed by some 20 offers to him from
UPON '"HOOVER SPEECH
Charges Use Of Words To "Conceal
Rather Than .Convey" In !

other producers; the q u i ld
straightway signed him to produce'
"Marco Millions" for them and dur-
ing the coming season he will stage,
in addition to three more produc-
tions for the Guild, two plays for
Sam H. Harris, one starring Jeanne'
Eagels and the other starring
Helen Menken.
Of the coast of "Porgy," but
three are white. The others are
Negroes and they play the leading
roles. The three roles played by
the whites are comparatively small
compared to the ones played by
Paul Robeson (Crown); Frank Wil-
son (Porgy); Evelyn Ellis (Bess);
Rose McClendon (Serena); Geor-
getta Harvey (Maria); Wesley Hull,
(Jake); etc.
The settings of Catfish Row are
authentic, being done by Cleon
Throckmorton after a visit to
Charleston, S. C., the locale of the
play, last summer. The Row it-
self is not called Catfish-in Char-
leston it is referred to as Cabbage
Row and a prominent New Yorker
recently purchased the old man-
sion house in which most of the
action of "Porgy" takes place.
WJR WILA.L BROADCAST'
U NIVERSITY_PRO 0GRAM
Fourth Michigan Night Program
To Be Given For Last Time
From Angell Hall
OOSTERBAAN WILL SPEAK
Broadcasting for the last time
from the old studio on the fourth
floor of Angell hall, the fourth of
the current series of Michigan
Night radio programs will be on
the air tonight between 7 and 8
o'clock through WJR-WCX, thel
"Good Will Station" of Detroit.
Included in tonight's program
are talks to be given by Prof. Ralph
W. Aigler, of the law school, Dr.

3

SUGGESTED PLAN WILL
SUBMITTED TO UNION
MEMBERS

Boston Speech Frederick A. Coller, professor of
surgery in the medical school and
BEGINS F I N A L CAMPAIGN University hospital, Dean John R.
Effinger, of the literary college, and
By Walter Chamblin "Bennie" Oosterbaan, Michigan's
(Associated Staff Writer) former All-American end and at
BOSTON, Oct. 24The charge sent a member of the Wolverine
that Her ct. 24.-er harsigecoaching staff.
that Herbert Hoover was using On the musical part of the pro-
words to "conceal rather than con- gram, Anthony J. Whitmire, in-
vey" a meaning was made tonight structor in violin in the school of
by Gov. Alfred E. Smith, who ripped music, will give four violin solos.
into utterance made by the Re- He will be accompanied by Maude
publican presidential nominee in Okkleberg. Odra O. Patton, grad.
soloist for the University Glee club,
New York City on water power, will also Winder vocal solos, accom-
farm relief, prosperity ,and prohibi- panied by Donna Esselstyne.
tion.
Opening his final drive for the'
presidency in this city where Hoov-
er spoke ten days ago, the Demo- O LYT S[KO
cratic candidate declared in a
speech especially prepared for the
occasion that the expression of
"state socialism" was the "stock ___
argument of the power trust"
which had been used against him Dr. Sylvanus G. Morley, who has
in his gubernatorial fight in New spent twenty field seasons working
York state. among the Maya ruins in the jun-
'The cry of socialism has been gles of Central America, will tell
patented by powerful interests," he of the results of his last season's
said, that, desire to put the damper work, in a University Lecture at
on progressive legislation." 4:15 o'clock in the Natural Science
The governor argued that on the auditorium today.
question of water power the prob- Dr. Morley, who is a recognized
lem simmered down to this: world authority on the heiroglyphic
"Either the people are to retain writing of these ancient people, is
these waterpower sites under associate in American Archaeology'
public ownership and public con- of the Carnegie Institution of
trol, or they are to lease them to Washington. For the past four,
private companies for private years he has been in charge of the
profit." excavations conducted by the In-
The nominee then said he was stitution in the two ancient cities
"not simpleminded on this sub- of Uaxactun and Chichen Itza, on
ject" and. declared that he had the peninsula of Yucatan.
known " all along exactly where For several years Ann Arbor has
the Republican candidate stood." had the opportunity of hearing at
"What I have been trying to do first hand from Dr. Morley the
is to bag him in the open," he con- story of the discoveries made by
tinued. "From Aug. 11 to Oct. 22, this expedition.
Mr. Hoover succeeded in using F S O EV r
words to hide his meaning, but on PROFESSOREVYERE
last Monday night the cat got out O B R1
of the bag and, at Madison Square OF HERBERT H
Garden in New York City, he told
the Progressive members of his Basing his remarks upon a per-
own party, as well as the Demo- sonal acquaintanceship with Her-
crats of the country, that their pro- bert Hoover's character, Prof
posals would 'cause us to turn to Everett S. Brown of the political
state socialism.' . science department sketched
Hoover's career before a meeting
GERMAN ZEPPELIN of the Republican club last night.
P OSTPONES TRIP "Hoover got his start in politics
______ Ion the campus of Leland Stanford
APuniversity. He was the founder of

3

HyILL o U Lu l IUs~
MEMBERSHIP OF UNION

BEI

t
,j

WILL TAKE RISING VOTE
Under Suggested Pian Amendments
May Be Passed With Quorum
Of One Hundred
Supported by members of the
faculty and of the student body and
unanimously endorsed by the board
of directors of the Union, the pro-
posed amendment in the Union
constitution which would change
the method of amending -that in-
strument will be submitted to the
Union membership tomorrow night
in Hill auditorium.
In the first five minutes of the
time scheduled for the pep meet-
ing which beginning at 7:30 will
be held there, William E. Nissen,
'29, president of the Union, assisted
by Kenneth Schafer, '29, recording
secretary, will call the lower floor
of the assembly together.
Will Not Read Text
Owing to the fact that it is a
pep occasion and to the shortness
of the time alloted him, Nissen will
not read the text of the amend-
ment but will submit it as it will
be printed in tomorrow's Daily for
the approval of the membership.
Ballots being unnecessary, a ris-
ing vote will be taken upon the
amendment proposal and if two-
thirds of those seated on the floor
vote in favor of the proposal, it
will be recognized as sufficient to
change the Union constitution
amending process.
The present provision for amend-
ing the Union constitution requires
that at least 600 members of the
Union be present at an assembly
and that at least 400 and two-thirds
or more of those present vote in
favor of any proposed amendment
in order to secure its adoption.1
Under the plan as it will be voted
upon tomorrow night, a special
meeting or election of the members
of the Union may be called by a
majority of the board of directors
or on the petition of 200 members.
Notice Must Be Given
At such a meeting, amendments
may be passed, it is planned, if
two-thirds of those present vote in
favor of the proposal and if at least
100 members participate in the
election. It is provided however
that at least ten days notice by
suitable posting and publication
shall be necessary to make this
system workable.
The entire series of amendments
prepared in order to secure the
to the constitution which have been
change proposed will be submitted
at one time and must be voted upon
as a group, not separately.
It is the specific desire of the
board of directors of the Union
and of the student officials to have
it known that this method is no
way connected with the proposed
merit system amendment which
was voted uppn last spring and the
balloting disallowed because of
apparent fraudulent voting.
BRANCH LECTURES
ON MARKET PLANS
"Speed is the chief requisite in
handling perishable foodstuffs, and
therefore rapid distribution is the
goal of municipal marketing sys-
tems," declared G. D. Branch, di-
rector of markets for the city of
Detroit, in his lecture yesterday
afternoon in the Economics build-
ing.

Invitations will be issued shortly
for the premier private perform-
ance by Play Production on Thurs-
day and Friday, Nov. 8 and 9, ac-
cording to Valentine B. Windt, di-
rector of activities of Play Produc-
tion.
The vehicle chosen for the initial
effort this year by that group is
Rachel Crother's popular comedy
work, "A Little Journey." The play
is in three acts. Miss Crothers is
also the writer of two other notable
successes, "Mary the Third," and
"Old Lady 31."
The play was first produced on
the legitimate stage in 1918 at the
Vanderbilt theatre in New York
City. At that time a famous Eng-
lish actress, Estelle Winwood,
WASHINGTON ALUMNI
WILL HOLDBANQUET
Affair, On Occasion Of Michigan.
Navy Game, To Be Given
For Students
YOST TO ADDRESS GUESTS
The University of Michigan club
of Washington announced yester-
day final plans for the second na-
tional dinner to be given Friday
night, Nov. 9, at the Mayflower ho-
tel in Washington, D. C. The affair
is being given by the Washington
club for all alumni, former stu-
dents, alumnae, friends, and Michi-
gan residents who are attending
the Michigan-Navy football game,
the following afternoon in Balti-
more.
James O. Murfin, '96L, member
of the Board of Regents of the
university, will be toastmaster and
President Clarence Cook Little and
Coach Fielding H. Yost will be the
principal speakers.
Five dollars per person will be
the charge according to the an-
nouncement sent out by the com-
mittee in charge of the affair, of
which Col. D. P. Quinlan, '92L, is
chairman, and Norman C. Damon,
'22, secretary.
The dinner is to be strictly in-
formal and one of the big features
of this year's affair will be the
attendance of a large number of
Michigan alumni who are at pres-
ent active in poltical positions at
the Capitol.
HOOVER TO DISCUSS'
WAEWASINWEST'
By W. B. Ragsdale
' (Associated Press Staff Writer)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 24-Herbert
Hoover will make waterways and
the problems of agriculture the
subject of his middle-w e st e r n
speech at St. Louis on November 2.
The speech, which will be the last
but one the Republican presidential
candidate will make before the
election, will be delivered in the
Coliseum over a nation-wide radio
hook-up. The nominee will arrive
in that city late in the afternoon
and will go immediately to the au-
ditorium, leaving St.- Louis to pro-
ceed westward shortly after he fin-
ishes his speech.
Hoover now expects to leave
Washington on his trans-continen-
tal trip to his home in Palo Alto
to vote a week from tomorrow and
will make stops at Cumberland,
Md., and Louisville, Ky., on his way
to St. Louis. He will make brief
platform talks at both of these
stops. From St. Louis he will move
to Grand Island, Neb., and then to
Wyoming, Utah and Nevada over
the shortest route to his home.

played the lead. The play provides
for 18 characters with speaking
parts.
Invitations to private perform-
ances are in line with the new
policy adopted this year for Play
Production as announced recently
by Windt. A number of plays are
being produced from time to time
as pureilaboratory experiments of
the various classes under Windt's
direction. These give experience to
those interested in practically all
the fields connected with dramatic
production.
In addition from time to time
plays are to be given to which the
public will be invited by invitation
only. A list of probable recipients
of invitations to the two perfor-
mances scheduled is practically
complete, but there are a few
places left at both performances
for any interested. Students or
faculty members as well as out-
siders will be given an opportunity
to witness one of the performances
if they will address Play Produc-
tion in care of the University in
the near future, so that their
names may be added to the list
if it is not already filled. Not
more than 200 invitations will be
extended for either performance.
LITERARY SOPHOMORE HS
NAME CLASSOFF1IRS
Crawford, Densmore, Snyder, And
Witter Wins Offices in Election
Held Yesterday
ENGINEERS TO VOTE TODAY
Michigan's sophomore class of
the literary college yesterday elec-
ted its class officers for the coming'
year. J. Palmer Crawford was
elected president of the class over
Emerson Shroyer, 212 to 199. Doris
Densmore defeated Roberta Ried
for vice president by a count of 219
to 191. Edythe V. Snyder won the
secretaryship from Sarah Patter-
son, 222 to 190. Joseph Witter was
elected treasurer over Danny
Holmes, 221 to 184.
The sophomore engineers class
will assemble to elect their officers
at 11 o'clock this morning in room j

TO SHOW MOTION PICTURE
Yost And Freyburg, Former Captain
Of Track Team, Are Sought
As Speakers
Judge William L Day, 'OOL, a
former member of the football team
and president of the 'Athletic asso-
ciation, will deliver the principle
address at the first pep meeting of
the year at 8:00 o'clock Friday
night in Hill auditorium. "Bill"'
Day is now federal judge of a dis-
trict court in Cleveland.
The pep meeting is being held
by the Student council to rally
the support of the student body be-
hind the football team, which will
tackle Wisconsin in a conference
game here on Saturday. Student
support will be needed to maintain
the fighting morale of the team
as it enters the contest with the
odds against maintaining the Wol-
verine tradition of victory over the
Badgers.
Coach Fielding H. Yost, grand old
man of Michigan football, and Dick
Freyberg, '26, former track captain,
are being sought as speakers on the
program, and the band and cheer-
leaders will be on hand to inject
punch into the ceremonies. The
meeting will be presided over by
Paul J. Kern, '29.
Through the courtesy of the
Michigan theatre, free movies will

JUDGE DAY WILL DELIVE
PRINCIPAL TALK TO
STUDENTS

1

All students who signed for
seats in the cheering section
and have not received tickets-
in that section for the Wis-
consin game are requested to
apply this afternoon at the
Administration building on
Ferry field.
Students who have not
secured their cheering section
uniforms must present their
stubs at Moe's Sport shop on
North University avenue at
once.

0
'

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l
I4-
l
4

-

CLASS ELECTIONS TODAY
Sophomore engineers, 11
o'clock, 348 Engineering bldg.
Sophomore pharmics, 5
o'clock, 203 Chemistry bldg.

1

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Y
7
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Y
I
of
5'',
p
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r
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1
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-- -to
348 of the Engineering building.
The'sophomore pharmacy class will
meet at 5 o'clock this afternoon in
room 203 of the Chemistry building
to elect their leaders, and thus con-
clude the sophomore elections on
the campus.
The freshman class elections
will not follow next week as might
be supposed, but will be postponed
for at least two weeks. The Student
council has not yet decided as to
the exact week for holding the
elections for this class, as they feel
that the first year men should
have a longer time in which to be-
come acclimated and to become
familiar with the campus methods
and their classmates. The week
of Thanksgiving is perhaps the
leading choice now for the elec-
tions by the recently-entered stu-
dents.
Appointments to the various
class committees are now being
made, and will be announced as
soon as possible.
ENGLISH ATTEMPT
MESSAGE TO MARS'
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Oct. 24-Small ears
and long antennae in England
strained in vain today to catch a
return message from the big-eared
folks of Mars, to whom a wireless
was dispatched early this morning.
Dr. Mansfield Robinson, author
of the message, who professes ac-
quaintance with the Martians
through telegraphic means, clings
stoutly to his faith in the possibil-
ity of inter-planetary conversation.
He admits that no response was re-
ceived, but insists that his friends
up yonder are anxious to exchange
good wishes with him.
The wording of the message to
Mars remained a mntsru n h

be shown at Hill auditorium at the
conclusion of the meeting.
Pursuant to a motion passed by
the Student council last week, five
minutes of the pep meeting will be
devoted to a vote on a proposed
amendment to the Union constitu-
tion, revising the amending pro-
cess.
William E. Nissen, '26, president
of the Union, will read the amend-
ment from the platform, and askc
for a rising vote. A two-thirds
vote of a quorum of 600 will be
necessary to pass the amendment.
This scheme of voting on the
amendment has been adopted be-
cause of the difficulty of securing
a quorum of 600 student members
of the Union, necessary to revise
the constitution. Last year an
amendment providing a merit ba-
sis for appointing Union officers
had to be thrown out after it had
apparently been passed by 731 bal-
lots because seveial members of the
Union were believed to have cast
plural ballots.
FLIERS WILL TRY
FOR N EW RECORD
(By Associated Press)
ROOSEVELT FIELD, N. Y., Oct.
24-The cigar-shaped Lockheed
Vega monoplane Yankee Doodle
shot like a white projectile from
the runway this afternoon' and
headed for Mines Field, Los An-
geles, in an attempt to beat a rec-
ord that has stood for more than
five years.
Harry Tucker, owner; of the plane,
was in the rear seat, dressed in
organized"business suit, while the
controls' were in the hands of Cap-
tain C. B. D. Collier, sky writer and
joint holder of the round-the-world
speed record.
TO DISPLAY WORK
OF LOCAL ARTISTS
ProfessoranBruce M. Donaldson
has made announcement that the
sixth annual exhibition of the work
of local, professional and amateur
artists is to be held from November
14 to November 30.
The exhibition is to be held in
West Gallery, Alumni Memorial hall
and is open to members and non-

TT S. BROWN PRAISES CHARACTER
OOVER BEFORE REPUBLICAN MEETING
--

T
r
f

'as appointed a trustee of his uni-
versity, a position in which he al-
vays took pride.
"Hoover began activities in
;he World War long before
America entered. He worked for
Belgian relief, dealing with the
Allies and 'with Germany without
vetting into any diplomatic diffi-
;ulties with either side. He passed
between the lines continually and
handled enormous amounts of
money for both forces but his in-
Iegrity was not doubted for a mo-
ment.
"Mr. Hoover is by nature a sensi-
fa nnnn nn rl .ac ciyfmnbpaA ,,

gian People.
"The Republican candidate has
always been intensely interested in
the welfare of women and children.
In his relief work he directed most
of his attention to their care, re-
gardless of their race or national-
ity. 1e has a personal interest in
children and receives his greatest
enjoyment in their company."
"As I have known him and work-
ed with him, Mr. Hoover is one of
the most likeable men with whom I
have ever come in contact, 'Pro-
fessor Brown said. "He possesses
the qualities of leadership,
friendshinp comnassionc.oura e

uY issocima e ss)
LAKEHURST, N. J., Oct. 24.-A
cross-hangar wind that had in-
creased to more than 20 miles an
hour at dusk, just when it had been
expected to die away, caused post-
-.1.". .. r £T~n ra ~ .n n o lc

a system of financing athletics
that met with immediate success
and that is still in existence. As
treasurer of the athletic association
he exhibited that fine sense of
honor that he has displayed all

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