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October 24, 1928 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-24

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LBLISHED
1890

V

Lw4h

4 ail3

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

XXXIX. No. 27.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1928

EIGHT PAGES

. I

BRITAIN TO CONTINUE
NAVAL NEGOTITIONS,
DOUMNTS INDICATE
SUMMARIES OF NEGOTIATIONS
SENT TO ALL COUNTRIES
ON COMMISSION
DISAGREE OVER TONNAGE
Cushenden Continues Dealings
With United States And Italy
In Disamament Proposals
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Oct. 23.-PublicatIon of
the British white paper on the
Anglo-French naval agreement in-
dicates that Great Britain intends
to continue correspondence on the
matter with the two governments
which rejected the proposal-the
United States and Italy.
A summary of the negotiations
sent to all countries on the League
of Nations preparatory disarma-
ment commission by Lord Cushen-
dun, acting foreign secretary, on
Oct. 9, states:
"While the Japanese government
expressed their concurrence in the
purport of these proposals (the
naval compromise), the govern-
ments of the United States and
Italy, for reasons which are clearly
and cogently explained in their
notes, have not seen their way to
accept them. These communica-
tions are receiving the attentive
consideration of his majesty's gov-
ernment aid a reply will be made
to them in due course."
British Recognize French
The documents also reveal that
the British government gave re-
luctant recognition to the French
position with regard to army re-
serves as the price of obtaining a
naval agreement.
Lord Cushendun, in discussing a
conversation between Aristide
Briand; French foreign minister,
and Sir Austen Chamberlain, Brit-
ish foreig: secretary, at Geneva in
March, 1928, which led to the naval
compromise, wrote:
"In the matter of land disarma-
mient rthe questin of thelimitation 1
oif military ;trained reserves had
poved astumbling block. The
French government and the major-
ity Of the governments represented
on the preparatory commission had
held that reserves should be ex-'
cluded from limitation, while his
majesty's government, for reasons
into which it is here unnecessary to
enter, had consistently supported
the opposite thesis.
"For some time, however, they
had realized that further opposition
on their part to the exclusion of
these trained reserves could, in the
face of the attitude maintained by
commission, only have the effect of
the majority; of the preparatory
preventing progress indefinitely.
Suspected Withdrawal
"So long ago as April, 1927, the
British representative on the com-
mission (Viscount Cecil) clearly
foreshaded the withdrawal for the
sake of agreement of British oppo-
sition to the opinion held by the
majority of that body. When, there-
fore, the governments were ad-
vancing toward a compromise in
the matter of naval limitation, it
was felt that the process of agree-
ment could only be facilitated by
a formal intimation to the French
government that a concession made
to the views of his majesty's gov-
ernment on naval classifications
would enable them to withdrawal
their opposition to the French
stand in the matter of military
trained reserves."
In a telegram sent by Lord
Cushendum to Henry Chilton,

British minister to Washington
and in charge of tge embassy there
in the absence of Ambassador
Howard, on Aug. 10 he said that
the British government had re-
luctantly "proposed to offer no
further resistance to the French'
contention about military reserves
at the present time." He added
that it was not believed that any
American interest could be pre-
judiced by this change of position.
Newspapers Comment
The Daily Chronicle (Liberal),
in commenting on the white paper
today, asked if the concession to
France concerning construction
was to .be regarded as irrevocable.
The Daily News (Liberal) said
that general impression remained
that Great Britain had "seriously
endangered Locarno by committing
herself subtly but decisively to
Frenchinterests."
The text of the agreement itself

PROFESSOR ANDERSON PRONOUNCES
N E W UNION AMENDMENT ADVISABLE

"I am heartily in favor of the
proposed amendment because it
will make the Union constitution
workable," Prof. H. C. Anderson,
of the mechanical engineering de-
partment, declared yesterday in
referring to the proposed amend-
ment which would change the
method of amending the Union
constitution.
"On the other hand," he contin-
ued, "it has been practically im-
possible to get a quorum at the
Union for any kind of a meeting.
This amendment gives the board
of directors or a petition from 200
or more members a chance to call
a quorum and consider an amend-
ment to the constitution at any
time."'
Professor Anderson together with
Prof. Evans Holbrook of the law
school, Prof. J. Ralston Hayden of
the political science department,
William E. Nissen, '29, president
of the Union,, and Kenneth Schaf-
er, '29, recording secretary, com-
posed the committee of five which
considered the advisability of the'
proposed amendment and submit-
ted it to the board of directoi's of
the Union where it received that
body's unanimous approval.
"There was no desire on the part
of the committee," he explained,
"to mix up the question of the
number necessary to change the
constitution with the proposed
merit' system. It is an absolutely
different question and has no con-
nection with the merit system
whatever."
Professor Anderson stated that
he believed under the proposed
COMEDY CLUB OFFERS
WELLKNOWN SCRIPT
Sardou's "Diplomacy" Will Open
October 30 And Run
For Five Days
IS POPULAR PRODUCTION
Mail orders are now being re-
ceived at the Union for the various
performances by Comedy Club of
Sardou's "Diplomacy." The well
known play will open a week's run
at- the Mimes theatre next Tues-
day, Oct. 30, and continuing
through Saturday night, Nov. 3.
The George Tyler revival script
will be used.
Rehearsals have been in progress
for some time. The cast was se-
lected last week after try-outs by
many of the Comedy Club mem-
bers. Among the principal per-
sons in the cast are Lorinda Mc-
Andrew, '40, as Zicka, Elizabeth
McCurdy, '29, as Lady Henry, George
Priehs, '30, as Baron Stein, Pauline
Jacobs, '29, as the Marquise, Lillian
Setchell, '29, as Dora, Charles
Peake, '29, as Julian, Thurston
Thieme, '29, as Orloff, and Robert
Adams, '30, as Beauclaire.
Phyllis Loughton, '28, who was
promient for several years in
campus dramatics, particularly for
her success in "Dulcy," "You and I"
and "Seventh Heaven," as well as
for her direction of the 1927 Junior
Girl's play, "Eight 'Till Eight," will
direct the production. She will be
assisted by Thomas J. Dougall, '28,
star and co-author of the 1927
Union opera success, "The Same To
You."
Many successful runs have been
enjoyed by "Diplomacy." One of
the most notable was the George
Tyler revival of last year which
toured the country. Among the
4 well known actors and actresses
who starred in the Tevival were
William Faversham, Rollo Peters,
Helen Gahagan, Margaret Anglin,
and many other well known artists.

REPUBLICAN CLUB
WILL HEAR BROWN
This evening at 7:30 o'clock Prof.
Everett S. Brown, of the political
science department, will speak on
the personal side of Herbert Hoov-
er at an informal meeting of the
Republican club, to be held in
rooms 316-20 of the Union.
Professor Brown's experience in-
cludes time spent as a member of
Hoover's staff during the war. A
cordial invitation is extended to all
those interested.
P O O R M A N IS NOT
SERIOUSL Y H U R T

change there would be no danger
of the student body losing any of
its rights under the constitution.
And at the same time, he said that
he remembered but one occasion
within the past five or six years
at which an actual quorum was
present at a Union assembly.
The amendment as it will be
submitted to the male members of
the student body seated on the
lower floor of Hill auditorium at
the pep meeting Friday night pro-
vides that instead of the present
quorum of 600 necessary to vote
upon an amendment to the Union
constitution that 100 shall be nec-
essary for a quorum and that two-
thirds of those present must vote
in favor of a proposal in order to
secure its adoption.
CHOOSE NEW OFFICERS
IN ANNUALELECTIONS
Sophomore Architects, Freshman
Law, And Sophomore Dental
Students Vote
MORE BALLOTING T 0 D A Y
Sophomore architects proved
oblivous to "unluck 13" yesterday,
and that number from the class
held their elections anyway. Two
of the officers were voted in by
votes of 7 to 6, results showed later.
Claude Gunn was elected president
of the class over Maurice O'Brien,
10 to 3. O'Brien in turn defeated
Neil Warren for the vice-preident,
7 to 6. Dale Mehring defeated Fred
Schweitzer for secretary, 8 to 5.
Henry Moore won the treasurership
from Fred Arnett by another close
poll, 7 to 6. .
The freshman law class elected
Richard Gawne as president,
o- -0
CLASS ELECTIONS I
FOR THE WEEK I
( Today
( Sophomore Lits, 4 o'clock,
Natural Science auditorium. I
I Tomworrow
Sophomore Engineers, 11
o'clock, 348 Eng. Bldg.
Sophomore P h a r m i c s, 5 1
o'clock, 203 Chem. Bldg. .
o- --o
Wright Conrad as vice-predient,
and Robert Finch as secretary.
William Coltrap was elected treas-
urer.
The sophomore dental class
named Edward Zwergel for presi-
dent, Reed Dingman for vice-presi-
dent, William Kahl for secretary,
and Carl Nelson for treasurer.
At 4 o'clock this afternoon, the
sophomore literary class will hold
their elections for four class offices
in the Natural Science auditorium.
This is the only class election
scheduled for today, but consider-
able interest has been evoked on
the campus and a large vote is
expected. The polls will be open
until 5:10 o'clock for the conveni-
ence of those who have classes until
then.
Tomorrow, two classes will ballot,
and conclude the elections of the
second year groups. At 11 o'clock,
the sophomore engineers will elect
in room 348 of the Engineering
building, and at 5 o'clock, the phar-
macy sophomores will vote in room
203 of the Chemistry building.
FRANCE PREPARES
FOR CHURCH WAR
(By Associated Press)
PARIS, Oct. 23.-Church and
state, the war cries of which have
embattled France for half a cen-
tury, are unexpectedly lining up
their forces again. The battle al-
ready has been announced by pre-

liminary skirmishes in the Chamb-
er of Deputies Finance Commission
and when Parliament meets in No-
vember, the hydra-headed questionI
of the relation of a state who so
tradition since the third republic is
fundamentally laid and religious
orders and congregations driven
out of that state at the beginning
of this century will come up for1
solution.
WRITER COLLAPSES
WHILE AT LUNCH
(By Associated Press)
NEW ORK, Oct. 23-George Barr
McCutcheon, author of the Graus-
tark book and many other novels
and short stories, dropped dead to-
day just after lunching with a
narmn o fr~ n,,4

"RAINBOW'S i N IS
TITLE OF NEWBOPERA
NOW BEINGPRODUCED
THIS YEAR'S PRODUCTION BY
MIMES IS TO INCLUDE
MANY CHANGES
TO FEATURE NOVEL PLOT
Western Locale Will Provide Unusal
Opportunity For Unique Music
And Costume Effects
"Rainbow's End" has been chosen
as the title for the 1928 Mimes+
opera now being produced, accord-
ing to announcements made yes-
terday by E. Mortimer Shuter,
general director, and Paul Buckley,
treasurer. "Rainbow's End" will
constitute the twenty-third annual
opera presentation.
The authors of this year's book
are Hugh Claney, '30, of Chicago,
and David B. Hempstead, '31, of
Salt Lake City. Music and lyrics
are ascribed to Edward Heyman, '28,
of Chicago, with additional music'
and lyrics by William M. Lewis, Jr.,
'28, of Muskegon, and William Wat-
kins, spec., of Ann Arbor.
Three Scenes Planned
"Rainbow's End" will be divided
into two acts and three scenes. The
plot deals with a group of traveling
players who are stranded in the
West due to transportat'ion diffi-
culties. They arrive at a "dude"
ranch, the owner of which, a young
college graduate, was at one time
intimately acquainted with one of
the young ladies in the troupe The
leading lady falls in love with him,
others plot against him, jealousies
arise, and further complications
arise with a group of Indians who
are situated near-by. After some
difficulty, the whole situation irons
itself out, and many matters clear
up much to the satisfaction of the
reader at the closing scene.
Engage Costume Experts
Peter March of Detroit, a prom-
inent organization of style spe-
cialists and artists, has been en-
gaged to design and execute the
costumes for the coming produc-
tion. The entire staff of this firm
has been working for some time
on the creation of individual and
original styles for the Mimes show.
A representative of Peter March
spent several weeks during th'e
summer in close observation of the
modes and general appearance of
the Pueblo indians in order to ob-
tain local color for the various ef-
fects.
Many new and unusual dances
routines have been devised for
"Rainbow's End" principals and
choruses by Roy Hoyerm former
leading man with Fred Stone in
many of his shows and now play-
ing the leading juvenile part with
the Schuberts' new show, "To the
Queen's Taste." Hoyer spent some
time in Ann Arbor personally last
spring and at that time conferred
with Shuter as to means of incor-
porating the dances into the new
show.
Sets Being Constructed
Sets for "Rainbow's End" are be-
ing constructed by Frederick Reb-
man, master carpenter for all
Mimes productions, while the
painting of the sets will be done
by Axel Gruenberg, of Detroit, who
is widely known in that line of en-
deavor.
After a run of one week in Ann
Arbor, beginning Monday, Dec.-10,
the opera will prepare for its usual
Christmas trip. The itinerary this
year includes New York, Buf-
falo, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit,
and Cincinnati. In addition the

company will visit many of the
Michigan cities, including Lansing,
Grand Rapids, Saginaw, and Kal-
amzoo.
DAILY STATEMENT
ABOUT ELECTIONS
IS CALLED ERROR
In yesterday's Daily it was eron-
iously announced that the Senate
Committee on Student Affairs
granted a second Junior class elec-
tion after the Student Council had
refused it. Such was not the case.
The Student Council did not take
up the question of a re-election at
all, preferring to leave the matter
to the Senate Committee. The
Senate committee did not reverse
any action of the Council and ex-
pressed no disposition to do so.
It was also erronously stated that
the Senate committee acted on the
basis of evidence. Neither is that

SADLER OUTLINES TEN YEAR PLANS
DEV ELOPING ENGINE ERING RESE ARCH

If the plans of Dean Herbert C.
Sadler, of the Colleges of Engin-+
eering and Architecture, are re-
alized to a reasonable extent dur-
ing the next ten years, the Univer-
sity will at the end of that time+
have one of the finest departments
of engineering research available
in the country. At a meeting of
the division heads of the engineer-
ing research department held yes-
terday in the Union, Dean Sadler
outlined his plans for the future of
the department, and Prof. A. E.
White, present head of the depart-
ment, described the collected work
that has been accomplished to
date. The luncheon yesterday was
o - -o
In the near future The j
Daily will feature special arti- I
Scles dealing with th work I
| accomplished to date by the j
department of engineering I
I research, and with the needs I
of the astronomy department, I
j since it is thought that these I
I two branches offer the great- I
I est chronicle of progress in
I the recent developments of j
( the University. j
o - -o
planned as an opportunity for Dean
Sadler to meet personally the men
who have been responsible for the
research activity of the past three
years, and to give them some ink-
ling as to the future of their field
in the University.
Professor White, in outlining the
WIRELESS MESSAGDE
DISPATCHEDTO MARS q
Sender Is Confident That Radio
Communication Will Be
Established
WILL LISTEN FOR REPLY
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Oct. 23.-A brief mys-
terious message to Mars is on file
with the telepragh authorities
ready for its dispatch early tomor-
row to a big-eared woman in ,the
distant planet.
Dr. Mansfield Robinson, psychic
devotee, and author of this ambi-
tious message, retired to his sanc-
tum tonight in calm confidence,
fearless of the jeers of a skeptical
world. He is unmindful of the
scoffers, who point that the Mar-
itians may be ignorant of the Morse
code even if they are English lin-
guists-or rake up sundry technical
obstacles concerned with wireless
equipment for reception in the
Martian world.
Dr. Robinson's little telepram will
be sent out by the central office
in London via by the Rugby wire-
less station, whence it will be dis-
patched automatically into space
on a wave length of 18,700 meters.
Radio engineers at Stawoans will
listen in for half an hour on a
30,000 meters wave for a reply
from the warlike planet. Hoax re-
plies, the officials say, ,ire hardly
probable on such a wave length.
Robinson, who professes to have
held telegraphic communications
with a young woman in Mars, has
described her graphically. One pe-
culiarity of the Martians, he says,
is oversize ears, and jesters declare
that the experiment will be a fine
test of their qualities.
SENATOR CUR T IS
AT ALBANY RALLY

results of the department, pointed
out that even now Michigan had
the most thorough and varied re-
search unit of any school in the
country; also that it was working
on problems of greater scope and
variety, with the sole exception of
Purdue university, which is now
working on a $600,000 railroad
problem. He has interviewed heads
of many industries in and out of
the state in an attempt to bring
their problems into the hands of
University research men. Al-
though no formal announcement
has been coming, it is definitely
known that the cooperation of the
state manufacturers' association
has been assured for the future.
Dean Sadler remarked the crying
need of the University for greater
facilities in the automotive engin-
eering department in particular,
and the incongruity resulting from
the fact that the state of Michigan
led the world in the automotive in-
dustry. He pointed out that the'
demand of engineers in great in-
dustries for specialists in practical
fields had given way to a demand
for engineers trained in the fun-
damentals, given a background of
pure science in related fields.
No definite word has been given
out by the Board of Regents in re-
gard to the ten-year program out-
lined by the heads of the various
schools and colleges of the Uni-
versity, stating the needs of each,
but it is known that the entire ad-
ministration is favorable to the
development of the engineering re-
search department. This, along,
with further accomodations for the
observatory and for the University

REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN
IN EAST CLOSES WITH
SPEECH AT NEW YORK

administration
chief problems

itself, is one of the
of the future.

BANQUET AT CAPITOL
PLANNED FOR ALUMNI'
University Club At Washington Will
Give 2nd National Dinner On
Night Before Navy Game
DAMON PLACED IN CHARGE
Because of the success of the Na-
tional Dinner staged at Philadel-
phia last year, the night before the
Navy game, a second dinner will be
held this year in Washington, D. C.,
Friday night, Nov. 9, at which the
University of Michigan club of
Washington will be hosts to all
Michigan alumni who are attend-
ing the game in Baltimore, the fol-
lowing day.
Norman C. Damon, 22, a former
officer of the Washington club, has
been named chairman of the com-
mittee in charge of the banquet
and his committee will consistof,
Mark Finley, '78D, A. T. Newbold,
118E, Lee Kemon; '09E, Henry Rav-
enel, '21L, and Herman H. Schmid,
'17.
The idea of such an affair was
originated last year by Col. D. P.
Quinlan, '92L, President of the
Second District, but because of
necessary duties as Acting Chief
Coordinator for the Federal Gov-
ernment, he has been unable to
carry out the plans himself.
Although this year's dinner will
Snot be as elaborate as the 1927 af-
Ifair, much enthusiasm has already
been shown and a large attendance
is expected including many gradu-
ates of the Univeersity of Michigan
who at present are active in official
capacities at the Capitol. Among
the distinguished alumni who have
have already indicated their inten-
tions of attending are: E. J. Otto-
way, '94, president of the Alumni
association; James A. Murfin, '96L,
and Junius E. Beal, '82, members
of the Board of Regents; Congress-
man Robert H. Clancy, '07; Oliver
W. Perrin, '04, Director of the Sec-
ond district; Edward L. Cleary,
'07L, former president of the First
district of the Alumni association;.
Robert G. Young, '08L, president of
the University of Michigan club of
Pittsburgh. Fielding H. Yost will
be present, also.
Special trains will leave Detroit
Thursday afternoon, to carry mem-
bers of the University of Michigan
'club of Detroit to the affair. The
iprogram and price per plate for
I the banquet have not as yet been
announced.
O'NEILL TO SPEAK

HOOVER RETURNS TO CAPITAL
TO MAKE PREPARATIONS
FOR WESTERN TRIP
WILL SPEAK AT ST. LOUIS
Republican Candidate Receives
Great Ovation As He Carries
Fight Into Rival's Territory
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 23-Back
in Washington today after closing
his eastern campaign with a vig-
orous speech that brought him an
ovation in the home town of his
Democratic opponent, H e r b e r t
Hoover began to lay his plans for
the long trip westward to vote.
Except for a lunc on confer-
ence at the White House with
President Coolidge the Republican
presidential candidate spent virtu-
ally the entire day at his personal
headquarters mapping out his
course of action for the remainder
of the campaign.
Hoover Seems Happy
His visit with the president last-
ed for an hour and a half and
when the nominee emerged from
the White House he said that he
had a very pleasant chat with the
chief executive but declined to
reveal what had been the nature
of their conversation. A smile on
Hoover's face brought the remark
froma correspondent that he
"seemed happy."
"I have no reason to be other-
wise," the candidate replied.
He said that he had not yet de-
termined, what would be the sub-
ject of the speech he will make
on his westward trip but that it
probably would be delivered in St.
Louis.
H o o v e r reached Washington
early today from New York where
last night in Madison Square Gar-
den he was given a tumultuous re-
ception as he appeared to deliver
the last speech of his eastern
campaign. This swing into, the
homeground of Gov. Smith differ-
ed in many respects from his pre-
vious trip to Newark, Elizabeth-
ton and Boston. Instead of the
parades which on those trips kept
him continually on the move
through crowds, he spent his day
In Manhattan in a round of con-
ferences with leaders of the party
and of independent organizations
that are supporting his candidacy.
Expresses Confidence
Another difference' came as the
candidate for the first time threw
aside his rule against newspaper.
correspondents quoting his remarks
at press conferences and expressed
confidence that he would be the
victor on November 6. He repeat-
ed this expression shortly after-
ward at a luncheon with state
workers but warned them against
over-confidence.
Under the tentative plans that
have been made for his trip to
California, the candidate with Mrs.
Hoover and his tiny family will
leave Washington about October
30 and he will'speak at St. Louis,
on either November 1 or 2. These
plans call for him to move west-
ward to St. Louis by the most di-
rect route to his home in Palo Alto,
probably arriving there on Novem-
ber 5. His last eforts of the cam-
paign will be made in a speech over
a nation-wide radio hook-up from
his home at Palo Alto on the night
before the election.
Speech Drawn Attention
The candidate will spend his
time between now and his depar-
ture in preparing his middle west-
ern speech and in making a general
survey of the political situation. He
plans to see few callers and probab-
ly the last delegation to visit him
will be a group of social workers
who will come to see him tomor-

row.
Among his visitors today was
Secretary Kellogg who remained
with him a short time. The secre-
tary declined to say what he had
talked to the candidate about,
asserting that he had simply paid
him a friendly call.
0. S. U. TO BUILD
SPORTS COLISEUM
(By Associated Press)
COLUMBUS, O., Oct. 23-Plans
for winter sports"building at Ohio
I State UTniversity that' will rival the

(By Associated Press)
ALBANY, N. Y., Oct. 23-Repub-
licans had today in Gov. Smith's
official home city Senator Curtis,
the Republican vice-presidential
nominee, as the attraction at a,
party rally and luncheon.I
The Senator spoke briefly at
other occasions, but explainedl
that it was a rule of his not to
wage a campaign in a opponent's
home town and therefore he re-
mained from a discussion of is-
sues. He did predict an "over-
whelming" Republican victory in
November in his talk at the rally,
and his appearance and prediction
brought noisy cheers from the
crowd which filled the Odd Fellows
hall to overflowing.
GUEST ROOMS AREI
LISTED AT UNION
Students desiring to secure rooms
for relatives or friends for any of
the football week-ends this fall.

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