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October 23, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-23

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'ABLISHED
1890

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

OMMMOMMOMMONAMM"

X. No. 26.1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1928

EIGHT PAGES

NS IAN STArr PLANS
FOR MOST ELABORATE
YEAROOK IN, HISTORY
SUBSCRIPTION TOTAL OF 5,000
NEEDED TO PROVIDE FOR
PROPOSED EXPENDITURES
COVER IS DISTINCTIVE
New Plan For Pages To Be Used;
Seniors Are Slow In Making
Picture Appointments
With the Michiganensian staff
completing plans for the most ela-
borate and expensive yearbook in
the history of the University an-
nouncement was made yesterday
by J. Franklin Miller, '29, business
manager, that the subscription
drive, inaugurated shortly before
the opening of classes this fall,
would have to reach a total of
5,000 in order to make possible the
planned expenditures.
The cover which has been decid-
ed upon for the 1929 yearbook will
be the most distinctive ever to ap-
pear on an 'Ensian in the opinion
of Thomas Thomas, '29, managing
editor.
It is a dark tan, with a hand-
tooled embossing, deeply set in
leather, which lends dress and
charcter to the book. The em-
bossing gives a deep padded effect
showing the careful workmanship
and creative genius entailed.
The page plan of the yearbook is
to follow a distinctive scheme never
seen before on the Michigan cam-
pus. It is what is known as the
full page spread instead of the
half page spread used in former
years, and combines the most at-
tractive color scheme ever used in
the publication.
It is also planned to use figures
in the page borders with a two
color effect never before used on
the 'Ensian, according to the an-
nouncement.
Distinctive Division Pages Planned
More distinctive divisior; pages
are also being planned. They are
to be printed in six colors instead
of the usual four. Pictures for the
pages according to the plans will
be much larger than has usually
been the custom thus adding ex-
pense to this portion of the book.
The satire section will be entire-
ly. different from anything ever
carried in a Michiganensian. It is
planned to resemble the fascimi e
of a magazine of the day and will
be carried out with a campus at-
mosphere. More cartoons and pic-
tures than have used in previous
sections will be employed to make
this one of the strongest instead of
0,e of the weakest sections of the
book.
Only 300 seniors have so far sign-
edb contracts for their pictures, ac-
cording to Miller. "It is absolutely
necessary," he stated yesterday,
"that all seniors sign up for ap-
pointments before Nov. 15 as no ap-
plications will be accepted after
that date."
Seniors Urged To Get Pictures
IThe price of senior pictures is $3
Ind may be paid at the 'Ensian
business offices any afternoon ex-
dept Saturday between 1 and 5
9'clock. Seniors are being urged to
pay their fees and' make appoint-
ients as soon as possible because
Gf the fact that those having their
pictures made now can go to the
photographer at their convenience,
while those who wait until later
Will have to go when the photo-
graphers can take them.
Fraternities which have not al-
ready sent In their contracts for
pages should do at once, accord-
ing to Miller, if they wish to be

assured that a page will be reserved
for them, iiA the fraternity sec-
tion.
Fraternity, sorority, and other
house groups desiring to secure an
extra copy through securing 15
members are urged to get in touch
with someone in the 'Ensian office.

COACHES ISSUE
STATEMENT
Fielding H. Yost, director of
intercollegiate athletics, and
Elton E. Wieman, head coach of
the Michigan football team
made the following statement
jointly late yesterday afternoon:
"Published reports to the ef-
fect that there has been an es-
trangement between us are ut-
terly without foundation.. Our
association in our common effort
to advance the athletic interests
of Michigan has been too long
and too intimate to be jeopar-
dized by any minor misunder-
standings.
"For the handling of the foot-
ball squad up to October 5, Mr.
Yost assumes full responsibility.
Since the above date, Mr. Wie-
man has been in charge as head
coach.
"There is no disposition on
the part of either one of us to
dodge or shift responsibility. In
spite of the reverses this year,
the morale of the squad is
splendid. We are entirely sure
that there will not be a man rep-
resenting Michigan who will not
fight to his limit in each game."
Fielding H. Yost,
E. E. Wieman.
This statement was made fol-
lowing reports in some news-
papers to the contrary.
COMMITTEE SELECTED
TO AID HEALTH WOK
Essay Contest Will Be Staged In
State Schools For Public
Health Education
PRIZES TO BE AWARDED
At a meeting of the JointCom-I
mittee on Public. Health Education,
Oct. 8, Dr. Clarence Cook Little,
chairman' of the -committee, ap-
pointed a publicity committee in
order to stimulate interest in
health among the high school
children of the state. The decision
of the committee was made public
today. Prizes will be awarded for
the best essays written during the
year. First prize for the best essay
will be $20, second, $25, third, $10,
and fourth, $5. Similarly a prize
will be offered for the best cartoon
or drawing on the same subject,
$20 for first, $15 for second, third,
$10, and fourth, $5, a total of $100.
The schools enrolling the winner in
each class will receive a cup.
At the end of the year a booklet
will be published containing the
best essays and drawings. The
essays will be judged by a member
of the. Englishy, Journalism., and
Medical departments of the Uni-
versity. The drawings will be
judged .by a committee composed
of one member each from the Fine
Arts, Medical and, Architectural
schools.
The head of the English depart-
ment in each high school will de-
cide which is the best essay and
,cartoon in his school. All essays
and cartoons or drawings must be
sent in to the office of the Exten-
sion department before April 1, 1929.
LITHOGRAPHS ARE
TO BE DISPLAYED
Tomorrow, one of the finest ex-
hibitions of .contemporary and
nineteenth century lithographs
ever to be seen in Ann Arbor, will
close in the north end of the lobby

of the new architectural building.
The collection represents nineteen
contemporary and nineteenth cen-
tury artists and was loaned to the
College of Architecture by A. C.
Goodyear, Buffalo business man, a
well known collector.

U N I 0 N FRESHMEN
GROUPS TO M E E T
Three union freshman groups will
assemble at 7:30 o'clock tonight
for the first meetings of the cur-
rent year, it was announced yes-
terday by Jackson A. Wilcox, '30,
chairman of the Union underclass
department. Group one will meet
in room 302, group two in room 304,
and group three in room 306. The
other three groups will meet Thurs-
day night.
George Rich, '30L, captain of the
Varsity football team, will address
the freshman meetings. Announce-
ments of the group activities plan'-
ned for the year will be made by
the group leaders and will be ac-
companied by songs, yells, and
smokes.
Joseph A. Whittier, '31, will lead
the group one meeting, William
Ackerman, '31, will be in charge of
group two, and Lesle Beach, '31,
will direct group three, it was an-
nounced.
SMITH PLANS INCLUDE
MASSACHUSETTS TRIP
Attempt Is To Be Made To Turn
Bay State Electoral Vote
From Republicans}
MAY TALK ABOUT L A B OR4
(By Associated Press)
ALBANY, N. Y., Oct. 22-A full
program has been mapped out for
Gov. Smith for a one-day invasion
of Massachusetts in an attempt to
capture for the Democratic cause
the 18 electoral votes which the Bay
State usually chalked up in the Re-
publican column each four years.
The Democratic nominee said
today he would leave here at 10
o'clock Wednesday morning for
Boston where he is due at 3:30 p. m.
at South station. He will step from
his special train into a waiting au-
tomobile to be whisked away for an
hour'ts parade through the streets
of the citya
That night the candidate will
speak at 9 p. m. in the Arena which
he said, has a seating. capacity of
13,000. He added he had been ad-
vised that loud speakers also would
be installed in Mechanics' Hall and
Symphony Hall to enable an ex-
pected overflow audience to listen
in.
On hisi way to Boston, the nomi-
nee will make ten minutes' stop at
Springfield and Worcester. He said
his itinerary after leaving Boston
had not been arranged definitely
but it is possible he may stop off,
in Providence and a Connecticut
city for a parade.
The nominee today conversed
with a Massachusetts delegation
which included Senator David R.
Walsh, Frank Donohue, state chair-
man; Mayor Quinn of Cambridge,
and Charles H. Cole, Democratic
candidate for governor.
SUNDAY PAPER IS
DOOMEDTO FAIL1
That bulky Sunday newspapers
are doomed, is the belief of Willis
Abbot, editor of the Chr-istian
Science Monitor, a graduate of the
Michigan law school, and father
of Professor Waldo Abbot of the
rhetoric department, in speaking!
before a convocation at the Uni-
versity of Indiana recently.
Abbot, who is a veteran of 40
years of journalistic work, stressed
the importance of the newspaper in
American life, and in international
relations. He cited the case of the
Chicago correspondent to the Lon-

don Daily Mail, whose news con-
cerned only information concern-j
ing Big Bill Thompson and his pug-,
nacious attitude towards the King
of England. "Such journalism," he
declared, "may be a good news
break, but it is a dangerous source
of ill-feeling between the people of
two nations."
Abbot severely criticized the ex-
cessive use of syndicated funny
sections to build up circulation at
the expense of legitimate, con-
structive news and features.
- - - - -o
f . CLASS ELECTIONS
FOR THE WEEK
TodayE
Sophomore Architects, 4 o'clock,
Assembly room.
Freshmen Dents, 5 o'clock, 221
Dental bldg.
Freshman Laws, 5 o'clock, Room I
B, Law bldg.C

JUNIOR ELECTION IS
FINALLY SETTLEDAS,
POORMAN LOSES TO FARRELL
IN RE-ELECTION BY A
213-188 VOTE
RE-ELECTION PERMITTED
Anonymous Phone Calls Tell Juniors
Of Postponment Of Literary 'i
Elections
In the second election for presi-
dent of the Junior literary class
within the week, William Farrell
yesterday won the office from Ed-
win Poorman, his former opponent,
by a count of 213 to 188.
Last Wednesday, Poorman and
Farrell were contestants for the
same office at the Junior elections.
Poorman won by a large majority
on the first count of ballots, 282 to
247. After supper when members
of the Student council were count-
ing the votes for other offices, Wil-
lard Lowry, '30, junior councilman,
asked for another recount of the
votes, and it was granted. On the
secound count, it was found that
Poorman had mysteriously lost 19
votes and the Farrell had gained
20, the latter winning by a count
of 267 to 263.
Second Election Was Asked
Unable to accept the explanation
offered by members of the council
and others, supporters of Poorman
asked council for a new election,
but it was denied. They then went
before the Senate Committee on
Student Affairs, presented evidence,
and requested a new election on the
basis of evidence. The Committee
granted one by a vote of 6 and 5.
Anonymous Phone Calls Made
Yesterday, several men promin-
ent in support of Poorman were
surprised to find that they had
telephoned fraternities and other
groups in their candidates'support
and had told these groups that
there would be no Junior elections
yesterday afternoon. These men
were extremely surprised to hear
of it, and have positively denied
any knowledge of such action by
themselves. Among the men whose
names were given falsely over the
telephone in these scurrilous calls
were two men who were voted
offices last week, two who were
prominent in Poorman's support,
and the name of the Michigan
Daily was also widely used by the
anonymous phone users.
The Daily and all of the men
named were in no way connected
with these calls and knew nothing
of them until time of elections yes-
terday, it has been confirmed. No
trace has yet been found of the
callers, however.

_t

GALLI-CURCI DECLARES AMERICANS
NEGLECT DEVELOPMENT OF SOUL

"You Americans think too much
of the healthy development of the
body, often to the neglect of the
development of the soul," declared
Amelita Galli-Curci, popular color-
atura soprano, who sang here last
night. at Hill aduditorium. "The
soul needs proper food, nourish-
ment, and care, just as much as
one's body requires special atten-
tion to be in proper condition,"
she continued.
"Few realize the importance of
balance in all of the daily activities
balance in all the daily activ-
ities," the famous soprano averred."
Here in America, there is the ten-
dency to one extreme, while over
in Italy, there can be found in
many cities just the opposite ex-
treme, the devotion to the artistic,'
the beautiful, the aesthetic things
in life.
"As far as singers are concerned,"
she continued, "I firmly believe
ORGAN IST WILL PL&Y
AT TWILIGHT RECITAL
Fernando Germani, Distinguished
Italian, To Be Guest Soloist
Here Tomorrow Afternoon
IS YOUNGEST ;ORGANIST
Fernando Germani, distinguished
Italian organist, will appeear as
guest soloist tomorrow afternoon
at 4:15 o'clock in Hill auditorium at
the regular twilight recital. At 21,
he is one of the youngest organists
even to gain international fame
such as he enjoys and this is his
second trip to this country for con-
cert tours.

that one of the most important
parts of a singer's background is
the knowledge of how to play
violin,.a cello a piano, or any other
some musical instrument, be it a
instrument; but that should be ac-
companied further with the devel-
opment of a general taste for beau-
ty. That love for things beauti-
ful is often brought about by visits
to art galleries, visits to museums,
and walks in the counitry. In fact
all contacts with such factors con-
tribute materially to the creation
of an artist."
Carrying the discussion to her
own experience, Madam Galli-Curci
admitted that, "I hated piano les-
sons when I was five years old,
and if it were not for the persis-
tence of my family, I never would
have continued them. It was not
until I was ten or eleven years old
and then I became- deeply interest-
ed in my music. I feel sure, now,
that my experience in those days
when I cultivated a love for music
through the piano has been very
instrumental in my progress with
singing.*
"My first opera appearance was
to me like, the first dance a girl.
attends is to that girl, "Madam
Galli-Curci asserted." It was a
great pleasure for me; it was a
climax to all devotion to beauty,
to the hours of happy pleasure I
had spent at the many operas I had
heard, and to my entire previous
experience. I shall never forget
the occasion."
"B" OOSTERBAAN
TO SPEAK OVIR RADIO

HOOVER STARTS FINAL
CAMPAIGN TOUR WITH
SPEHAlNWYR

SCHOLARSHIP PRIZES
The Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications is offering
scholarship prizes under the fol-
lowing resolution:-
Resolved: That the Board in
Control of Student Publications
shall for the current year offer
cash prizes of $100 each for
scholarship attainment, accord-
ing to the following rules:
1. Every student who has done
substantial and satisfactory work
on any student publication or
publications under control of the
Board, for four or more semes-
ters shall be eligible for one of
these prizes. The Summer Ses-
sion shall be rated as a half
semester.
2. Every such student who has
attained an average scholarship
of B or better during the period
above specified shall receive one
of these prizes.
3. Every student who believes
himself entitled to a scholarship
prize shall file an application
for the same at the Board office
in the Press building after the
opening of the University in the
fall land before November, and
the prizes shall be awarded and
paid before the Christmas holi-
days.
4. No student shall be an ap-
plicant for any scholarship prize
more than once.
5. The scholarship standing of
each applicant shall be estimat-
ed in accordance with the sys-
tem of grading employed in the
various schools and colleges of
the University.
The Board requests applicants
for these prizes to file their ap-
plications as soon as possible at

Germani made his first triumphs
in this country in debut concerts
in New York and Philadelphia as
well as cities in New England and
Canada. Upon his return to Italy
following his great success here,
additional honors were heaped up-
on him there. He was chosen by
Alfredo Casella, the famous Italian
composer and conductor, to play
the Italian premier of one of the
latter's recent compositions, "Con-
certo Romano for Organ and Or-
chestra," reputed to be a work of
ultra-modern tendencies and of the
utmost difficulty.
Last May, Germani was chosen
to give a special recital on the oc-
casion of the birthday of the Pope.
His audience at that recital in-
cluded the musical elite of Rome
as well as several cardinals of the
Catholic church and members of;
the Italian nobility.
Later, the young artist obtained
further fame with the inauguration
of the newest and largest organ in
Italy, an instrument of 120 stops. .
At present, further recognition
is being accorded Germani by the
Italian composer, Respighi, whois
writing a special suite for the organ
and orchestra for him.
CHANGE MADE IN
C L A S S ELECTIONS
Due to the fact that two ad-
vanced schools have no sophomore
classes and to a change in the time
of the engineering elections, atten-
tion of all sophomore students has
been called to a rearranged sched-
ule for class elections for the pres-
ent week.
Today, there will be no engineer-
ing class elections, the sophomore
architects opening the day at 4
o'clock in their assembly room to
vote for their class officers.
The freshman Law and the fresh-
man Dental students will also vote
today. The Law freshmen will
meet at 5 o'clock in room B of the
Law building, and the freshmen
dental student at the same time in
room 221 of the Dental building.
Tomorrow, the sophomore liter-
ary class will meet at 4 o'clock in
the naturalscience auditorium for
their class elections. Several
caucuses have already been held
among members of the class, andI
interest is strong.
GRIDIRON TICKETS
S T I L L AVAILABLE
Tickets for the Michigan-Wis-
consin game are still available it
was announced late yesterday aft-
ernoon by Harry Tillotson business
manager of the Michigan Athletic
association.

Diversified Program Will Feature
This Thursday Night's
Broadcast
WILL PRESENT MUSICIANS'
A diversified program consisting
of talks by Prof. Ralph W. Aigler,
Dean John R. Effinger, Dr. Fred-
erick A. Coller, and "Bennie"
Oosterbaan, and a musical program
to be presented by Anthony J.
Whitmire and Odra O. Patton, '30
S of M, will constitute the fourth
Michigan Night radio program to.
be broadcast between 7 and 8
o'clock next Thursday' night
through WJR-WCX, the "Good Will
Station" of Detroit.
Professor Aigler, of the Law
School, has chosen as his topic
"The Meaning of a Warranty l
Deed." He will point out the things
a purchaser of a piece of property
should look for in an abstract of
title.
Dr. Coller, professor of surgery
in the medical school and Univer-
sity hospital, will again appear be-
fore the microphone, speaking on
"Hernia." His previous talks on
Michigan Night programs, which
dealt with goiter and gallstones,
were well received by the radio
audience it was announced by Uni-
versity officials. .
"The Purpose of Education" is
the title of the talk to be given by1
Dean Effinger, of the literary col-
lege. He will discuss just what
constitutes a practical education.
"Bennie" Oosterbaan, Michigan's
former All-American end and at
present one of the members of the.
Michigan coaching staff, will de-
liver the final talk of the evening,
discussing some of the phases of his
work.
GRIDIRON PLAYER
SUSTAINS INJURY
Edwin "Bud" Poorman, '30, was
taken to the University hospital
yesterday after sustaining a slight
injury to his neck during football
practice. An X-ray failed to reveal
a fracture and hospital attendants
said the injury was only a muscle
strain.

REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE SEEMS
TO BE VERY CONFIDENT
OF VICTORY
PRAISES UNITY OF G. 0. P.
Republican Leaders Are Charged
With Responsibility Of
Getting Out Voters
By W. B. Ragsdale
(Associated Press Staff Writer)
NEW YORK, Oct. 22-With re-
peated expressions of confidence in
his election on November 6, Herbert
Hoover tonight unlimbered his guns
in the camp of the opposition for
the final blast of his campaign in
the east in a speech at Madison
Square Garden.
Twice during the strenuous day,
that preceded his appearance at
the Garden, the Republican candi-
date gave voice to his firm belief
that over-confidence alone could
bar a Republican victory at the
polls.
Shortly afterwards in a talk to
national and New York state Re-
publican workers, the nominee
made his second declaration of
confidence, coupled with a remind-
er that the duty of these leaders
was to see that every Republican
voter reached the polls and that
the ballot was honestly conducted.
"We have not in a quarter of a
century witnessed such unity with-
in our ranks as we see this day
throughout the whole land," he
said. "I have but one reservation
upon the conclusion of this elec-
tion-that is that we may in our
over-confidence relax our efforts
before every ballot is delivered into
the box.
Organization Is Stressed
"To see that our people are in-
structed as to the vital issues of
the campaign; to see that every
Republican voter reaches the polls,
that the ballot is honestly conduct-
ed-that is your responsibility and
a great responsibility. It is party
organization."
Declaring that campaigns were
periods of national education in the
fundamentals of government and
that American people were fortun-
ate in having two major political
parties, he turned to an indorse-
ment of the New York state Re-
publican ticket.
"There lies before you the oppor-
tunity to restore a Republican gov-
ernor to the State of New York and
the Republican representatives in
our national councils," he said.
"Republican supremacy in the na-
tion is not only- greatly strength-
ened by the supremacy in this state,
but a strong Republican presenta-
tion in our Senate and House are
.a vital necessity if a Republican is
to consummate the will of the
American people.
Praises State Ticket
"It is a great satisfaction that'
you have named Attorney General
Oppinger and Mr. Houghton as rep-
resenting the leadership of your
state and I take particular satis-
faction because of the old and long
established friendship I have had
with these gentlemen. We have
need in the Senate of men of the
experience of Ambassador Hough-
ton and we have sad need in the
governorship of New York for At-
torney General Oppinger. Their
election will place confidence' and
strength not alone in the state of.
New York, but in the entire nation.
"This is not an occasion of the
discussion of our issues, it is rather
an occasion for dedication of our
resolutions to continue in this fight
until the end. The results of vic-
tory are far beyond advancement
of any particular person. It is the
determination that it shall contin-
ue this nation on the wheelroad
to human progress."

NEW UNION AMENDMENT WILL MAKE
AMENDING PROCESS LEGAL-HAYDEN

"The purpose of the, amendment
which will be submitted to the Un-
ion membership Friday night is to
make it p5ossible to amend the con-
stitution in a legal way," Prof. J.
Ralston Hayden, of the political sci-
ence department, stated yesterday.
Professor Hayden ,was a member
of the committee of five formed
by Prof. Evans Holbrook, of the
law school, to consider the possible
need of the proposed amendment.
The committee's report recommend-
i non. o gan wa inanimonislv

or at an election at which the same!
number of ballots are cast.
"Under the election plan, the
usual method of placing ballot
boxes at certain designated places
can be followed. As these boxes
could be left in place for an entire
day, a vote of at least 100 would
be easily assurred," Professor Hay-
den pointed out.
"The committee felt, however,"
he explained, "that with 100 votes
necessary to make the balloting le-
gal and with 10 days notice of the

PLANS ARE ANNOUNCED FOR TIMES
CURRENT EVENT CONTEST IN MARCH
WI
Plans for the New York Times The local prize of $250 will be di-
Inter-collegiate Current Events vided into three smaller prizes of
contest of this year were formu- $150, $75, and $25, the second award
lated at a meeting of the academic to be given to the underclassmen
council held Saturday in the Times with highest grade. The winning
offices at which Prof. Everett S. papers in each of the twenty uni-
Brown of the political science de- versities participating will be sent
partment represented the Univer- to the executive committee who
sity of Michigan. will award the national prize of
Prof. Brown, who returned to Ann $500.
Arbor yesterday, announced that The winner of the third annual
several important changes had contest at Michigan last year was
been made concerning the rules of Karl K. Leibrand '28. The national
the contest. The most significant prize was won by Francis B.

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