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October 19, 1928 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1928

......

Published every morning except Monday
during the Universit year by the Bard in
Control of Student Publications.'
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.oo; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
nard Street.
Piones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor d......................Paul J. Kern
City Editor. ... ......Nelson J. Smith
News Editor.. ..Richard C. Kurvink
Sports Editor................ Morris Quinn
Women'S Editor....,.... Sylvia S. tone
Editor Michigan Weekly.. J. Stewart Hooker
Mdusic and ~Drama...... .... .R. L. Askren
Assistant City Editor.....Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
Clarence N. Edelson Charles S Monroe
Joseph E. Ho well Pierce Ror-anberg
Donald J. Klinc George E Simons
George c. Tilley
Reporters
Paul I, Adams Ruth Kelsey
Morris Alexander Donald E. Layman
Esther Anderson C. A. Lewis
C. A. Askren Leon Lyle
Bertram Askwith Marian MacDonald
Fenelon Boesche Henry Merry
Louise Behymer N'. S. Pickard
Arthur Bernstein William Post
Isabel Charles Victor Rabipowit
L. R. Chubb john T. Russ
Laura Codling Harold Saperstein
Frank E. Cooper Rachel Shearer
Helen Domine Howard Simon
Edward Efroymson Robert L. Sloss
Douglas Edwards Arthur R. Strubel
Valborg Egeland Beth Valentine
Robert J. reldman Gurney Williams
Marjorie Follmer Walter Wilds
Oscar f~uss Edward Weinnman
William Gentry Robert Woodroofe
Tom Gillett Toseph A. Russell
Lawrence Hartwig Cadwell Swanson
Willis Jones A. Stewart
Richard Jung Edward L. Warner Jr.
Charles R. Kaufknan Cleland Wyllie
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
Advertising......... .Alex K. Scherer
Advertising......... .A.- James Jordan
Advertising.... .........*Carl W. Hammer
Service............ ..Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation..............George S. Bradley
Accounts....... .....Lawrence E. Walklcy
Publications...... ...... Ray M. Hofelich

untary and when he had the time
to spare.
This year, early last month, it
became generally understood that
Professor Yost would again be
head coach. This came from re-
putable sources, and intimations
have been that it was done to help
fill the stadium. On the eve of the
Ohio Wesleyan game, the Profes-
sor made an emphatic statement
that Tad Wieman, and not he, was
head coach. Had te announce-
ment been made earlier, it might
have cleared later difficulties.
Michigan then suffered two de-
feats, and the day after the last
one, Professor Yost left town to go
to Nashville on business. The news
hounds, ever alert for scandal or
material for a good news break,
imediately took it to heart, and
with misdirected emphasis, made it
appear in the wrong light.
Director Yost has been at Michi-
gan too long to have been forced to
be the target of bad news writing
and emphasis. His name follows
"Michigan" perhaps more easily
than any other. The alumni
swear by him. Many students, who
have heard about him from papa
and Uncle Joe who once went to
Michigan, think that he founded
the institution. People of the state
have followed his teams and his
speeches before them, in a manner
that would credit a great states-
man or finance wizard.
The dim finger of suspicion has
pointed away now. Professor Yost
has cleared himself. The outward
appearances were bad, and it would
have been wiser to have announced
his trip earlier or In a different
manner. But he appears to have
been the victim of unwonted news
writing. He had a right to ltave.
He had full right in trusting the
other men to direct the team-he
knew it would not be misplaced.
Footballs are not the only things
professors have to dodge.
IN MEMORIAM
By the death of Dr. Eliza M.
Mosher, '75M, last Wednesday, the
University of Michigan has lost
one of its most distinguished alum-
nae. She was one of the first wom-
en to be graduated from the med-
ical school and did notable work in
opening the medical profession to
women. In 1896, she became the
first dean of women in the College
(then Department) of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, and held
this position until 1902. At the
present time, there is a University
loan fund named after her, from
which many University women
have been aided.
In June of 1927, she made her
last visit to her Alma Mater, and
received the honor of turning the
first spadeful of earth at the site
of the new Women's league build-
ing, which is now nearing comple-
tion.
Dr. Mosher was 81 when she died.
Most of her years she gave in serv-
ice to her University and to her
profession. Her career in the edu-
cational and medical fields is envi-
able. As President Little has aptly
put it, "Certainly in her passing,
we have lost one of the most
valued and distinguished of the
University's alumnae."

Irving Binzer
Miary Chase
jeoette Dale
Vernor Davis
Helen. Geer
Kasper Halverson
Jack Horwitch

Assistants
George R. Hamilton
Dix Humphrey
Bernard Larson
Leonard Littlejohn.
Carl Schemm
Robert Scoville

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1928
Night Editor-GEORGE C. TILLEY
NASHVILLE'S LOSS IS OUR GAIN
Prof. Fielding H. Yost of the De-
partment of Physical Culture went
to Nashville, Tenn., early this week
on business. Soon after his depar-
ture, certain metropolitan papers
with a more watchful eye on circu-
lation and sensationalsim than on
truth and reason, immediately
blazoned forth the fact that Van-
derbilt university was near Nash-
ville, that Professor Yost's brother-
in-law was head coach there, that
Professor Yost coached football,;
and while not intimating it strong-,
ly, dropped hints that he was dis-
satisfied with the local pridesand
sought more fertile fields. To their
reading public, two and two made
something else besides four and the
idea became started that Professor
Yost had given up what is consid-
ered a rather poor team for Michi-,
gan, and had left the University,
with whose name he has become
forever connected.
Reporters from certain news-
papers have denied vehemently
that they said anything about
Professor Yost's resignation, that
nothing concerning his dissatis-
faction with the Michigan team:
was said, and that they were
whole-souled, stainless gentlemen
of the press who were doing noth-
ing but their level best for the free-
dom of the press and the great god,
Journalism.
Yet these reporting gentlemen
have failed to see that, in spite of
all their protestations of innocence,
apologies for their stories are
forthcoming. If not for what they
intimated, at least for a very poor,
job of news-writing, because the
majority who read their accountsj
received the idea that Professor
Yost had thrown down the Michi-
gan team. If they will not confessl
that they misauoted and led to]
false impressions, they must con-
fess that their mechanics and tech-
nique fell far short of what shouldr
have been expected of such a deli-1
cate story,
Professor Yost has now been att
Michigan for 28 years, and eight ofg
these have seen him as Director ofi
Intercollegiate Athletics. In thee
time that he has been here, thes
.,-4- , 1-1, 4- -1-- -

OASTED ROLLS
STUDNT COUNCIL
WILL GO TO
VANDERBILT
An unsubstantiated rumor was
rife on the campus at a late houri
last night that our own student
council, for the last twenty-five
years the most wily and feared po-
litical machine in the Western
Conference, would resign and
assume active duty again at Van-
derbilt University at Nashville,'
Tennessee.
* * * .
We can't understand their
motive in this. They, at least,
won their first two elections.
* * *
"It was an honest election," sob-
bed Rollo J. Kurnn, president of
the student council, with feeling,
substantiated by "Honest" John
Milgarten.
Yes, we admit that the election
was.
* * *
If your ticket won it was an
honest election; if not the op-
posing party, the Student
Council, and practically every-
one else are crooked. When
the election is so close that
neither ticket wins all offices
then both sides are crooked.
Heaven help the sailors and the
Student Council on a night like
this!
* * M
The difference between the
football team and campus poli-
ticians is that the football team
knows how to take a beating.
A Polite Halfback Never Offends
Somewhere we noticed a head-
line: "Michigan Drills On Offense,"
and it occured to us before we
could say Jack Robinson (We
wouldn't have said it anyway) that
the team is already offensive
enough.
Nhom D' Plume.
* * *
Yesterday a freshman called
Dr. Little and asked him if he
had to wear his pot down to
Columbus.
To which, we suppose, Doc.
snappily replied that he should
leave it in the back seat of his
car.
* * *
These Women Will Have To Let Us
Alone; This Is A Man's Column
Sour Sue, that dumb co-ed, Three
Star thinks is pretty good, sent in
three typewritten sheets of the
most insane cracks we have ever
seen. From the entire mess we
salvaged this, repaired it a trifle,
corrected the grammar, inserted
punctuation, and generally dressed
it until now it would do credit to
a grammar school girl.
"Let's all us girls get together
and boost to beat Indiana in 1948."
* * "
We were really getting to
admire you, Sue, until you
pulled that wheeze about vot-
ing the same way Lindbergh
does. Now you are just one of
the multitude of sentimental
females who think Lindbergh
is a national hero.
** *

Headline in Daily: BATES
TALKS BEFORE SOCIOLOGICAL
GROUP.
Well, what of it?
A fellow in New York beat hisr
wife the other day because she
boiled his eggs for 78 minutes.
Well, that's just what we are
trying to get through that thick
dome of Sour Sue, you have to
keep these women in their j
places., ,
A California woman recently won
the rolling pin tossing champion-1
ship with a toss of 150 feet.
What a wonderful wife she is go-
ing to make some man!
* * *
We suppose that all our
public will be down at South r
Ferry field to watch us trim
the Union on Saturday morn-1
ing at 10:30.. And after we get c
through playing the Union, we
will challenge the Tolstoi'
league.

The appearance of Galli-Curci
Monday night in Hill auditorium
marks the third time which the
coloratura soprano star has sung:
before Ann Arbor audiences.
The story is told of her first ap-
pearance r in this country some
dozen years ago when she sang as
guest star for the Chicago Opera
Company. Then an "unknown,"
the prospects for Chicago were
very pessimistic. The season prom-
ised to be dead. La Galli-Curci
sang the first night. The next day
Chicago called the season a sensa-
tion-literally swarmed to hear her
again. Newspapers ran front page
"banners." Within the week the
Ann Arbor May Festival manage-
ment had executed a conr at
which would secure he e1 .
for one of the Sprin cnrts u
an extraordinarily heav sason
cost the Diva her heath and Ann
Arbor the concert. Lu yGates
substituted.
In the fall Galli-Curcii r'ne. A
Arbor staged an ovation. Four
years ago she was heard in the
Choral Union Series. A similar
popular demohstration closed the
program. In the following po-
gram Ann Arbor will again be able
to applaud a skilled musical melo-
dramatist.
O del mio amato ben .....Donaudy
Whither runneth my Sweetheart
... .... . ..Bartlett
Adieu notre petite table, from..
"Manon".............Massenet
Cantata (with flute) .....Scarlatti
Waldeinsamkeit .... . ........Reger
Spanish Serenade..........Bizet
L'eau qu court .......... Georges
Echo Song (with flute) ....Bishop
INTERMISSION
Prelude,...............Beecher
Rikki-Tikki-Tavi ..,........Scott
Uncle Remus' Rhapsody .. . .Morris
MR. SAMUELS
A rainy-night Lullaby .... Hamilton!
Lavender Gown ......... Cameron
I meant to do my work today....
........... Mowrey
Theme and variations (with
flute) ......... ..Mozart-Adam
Accompanying Mlle. Galli-Curci
will be Mr. Homer Samuels, in pri-
vate life her husband, at the piano,
and Mr. Ewald Haun with the flute.
R. L. A.
* n
A TROUBADOUR POET?
A Review by Paul L. Adamsf
A fresh though somewhat dis-
concer;tng personage, Vachel Lind-
say certainly amused and impres-
sed his audience last evening even
though he failed to inspire. His
finest piece, "The Congo," was the
most charactistic and -x-2llent se
lection of the evening; showing, as
it did, the bubbling enthusiasm, love
of song, and the originality of the
author.
Mr. Lindsay renders his poems
in a singsong chant which is un-
doubtably fitting for the expression
of their moods; but which destroys
something of their content owing
to the fact that the listener loses
some of it in the blurred enuncia-
tion. This is regretable for one
also loses to a certain extent Mr.
I Lindsay's own peculiar method of
handling his subjects.
Opening his program decorously
with a series of five pictures: "The
Dawn Path," "The Spring Path,"
"The Book Path," "The Sunset
Path," and "The Moon Path," one
was impressed with the virility of
Mr. Lindsay's poetry and rather
startled by his use of the refrain
which was not as effective in these

as in some of his other poems.
This reaction was heightened by
his next poem, "When I. See an In-
dian," which portrayed Mr. Lind-
say's own tendency to strike out for
freedom and untrampledness of
spirit.
"The Locomotive Dragon," a
child's poem and "Spokane's
Braided Sun" were both excellent,
the first for its fantasy, the second
for a certain elemental natural-
ness; but when Mr. Lindsay reach-
ed his "Every Soul Is A Circus" one
wondered if the meeting had not
degenerated into an old fashioned
revival with the poet undergoing
grotesque gymnastic exercises and
leading the audience to the chant
of: "Bring, bring the wonders
down." However, everyone was
happy, and enjoyed the somewhat
jumbled, soaring fantasy after Mr.
Lindsay had explained it. His giv-
ing it, was more effective than a
silent reading would be.
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Music And Dramag

GALLI-CURCI

P O R G Y
The heart of a primitive
people chanted in the
rhythm of the negro race.
Tuesdav. Oct. 30
2:30-8:15
Mail Orders
Room A-Memorial Hall
Whitney Thea.
ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW!

RAE MAT.
7 9:5 RAE 2.4
Last Times Today
"NIGHT LIFE"
with
ALICE DAY, WALTER HEIRS,
AND EDDIE GRIBBON
Saturday
CHARLES RAY
in
"THE COUNT OF TEN"

WATCH
FOR OPENING
of The
"ChoColate Camp"
516 William Street
by Birneys
of Grand Rapids, Mich.

WAIIER&COMPAHY
j Tenc sxSnce 1&4&

1 -

THE UNION AMENDMENT
Although appearing tZ 'ie almost
'unnecessarily radical in its most
important provision, ine amend-
ment proposed to the Union con-
stitution contains much that
Imakes it worthy of consideration
and adoption by the Union mem-
bership.
That the present constitutional
requirement, making it necessary
for a quorum of 600 be present at
a Union assembly in order to pass
upon any proposed amendment,
has been demonstrated to be im-
practicable can hardly be doubted.
The only question which appears to
need discussion is the number nec-
essary for a quorum. It, under the
proposed change, would be one
hundred.
To place the power of changing
the Union's organization within the
hands of sucl a small number, it
is true, appears dangerous. But on
second thought it has been pointed
out that in the past there has been
little or no active opposition to any
proposed change. At the same
time, the Union constitution pro-
vides that suitable notice of any'
amendment must be given 10 days
previous to its submission to an
assembly of the membership. With
that much time, it would eem that
any opposition to a proposal would
be able to arrange to be present at
an assembly and to vote in such
strength as to prevent the passage

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Vachel Lindsay may have had a
varied career, but after The In-
lander magazine gets through with

0

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