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October 17, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-17

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ESTABLISHED
1890

-Jr-

itr

I a11

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

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I

Vol. XXXIX. No. 21.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1928

EIGHT PM

CHANGES ON CAMPUS
R~~BCOE BYLTL
IN ADDRESS TO

LINDSAY, "VAGABOND RHYMSTER,"
FOLLOWS INTRIGUING VOCATION

HIGH PRIESTS ~'OF

DOCTRINE

OF FUNDAMENTALISM
ARE FAILING

WOMEN
President
On

ARE CHALLENGED
Says That No Religion
Earth Can Know
Whole Truthj

"In the last six years the job
of the university president has
changed tremendously," said Presi-
dent Clarence Cook Little, in an
informal discussion of the attitude
~of the University administration
toward the mutual problems of the
student and the administration on
this campus, before approximately
500 women students and faculty'
members last night in the ball-
room of the Union. "Things are1
moving so fast that one can't wear
a frock coat any more; it takes too
long to button itT The silk hat is
out of the questtion, for the wind
would soon blow it off.
"This condition is a healthy one,
but it is not comfortable. One no
longer has' time to sit in rockng
chairs. Today things are in a con-
dition of flux, and especially is this
true in our great American state
universities. Here, as elsewhere in
the. world, there is making 'itself
manifest a great and tremendous
social phenomenon over which we
have no control.
Do Favored Few Know Truth?
In education, in politics, and in
religion, evidence points to the
fact that social organization is
throwing off an old and, what was
once conceived to be infallible, doc-
trine, or state of affairs. This state
of affairs is fundamentalism, and
at present its high priests are be-
ginning to feel a draught.
"Fundamentalism," continued
President Little, "is the belief that,
the favored few know the truth. It
used to be that the student, was
the man or woman who echoed
back this truth, and that was all
there was to it. That has changed,
is changing, however, and today
the student and the administra-
tion combine to discover the ele-
ment in the university that is tak-
ing the high priest attitude. 'Why?'
is being asked about the student,
and thereby the teacher admits
that he doesn't know everything.'
Self-satisfaction, smuggness, and
fundamentalism are shatteered.
Students Responsible
Now, the student is asked to con-
tribute, and the responsibility and
the obligation are on his and her
shoulders. You are expected to
lok out for your rights. It is up to
you whether you will be fundamen-
talists, or whether you will make
your education alive by fighting for
its growth."
ARRANG EENTSMADE
FOR ABSENT VOTERS
Republican student voters who
wish to cast absentee ballots in the
forthcoming election will be af-
forded this opportunity if they go
to Room 302 in the Union -any aft-
ernoon. The University Republican
club, which has lately merged with I
the Hoover club, will now hold its
official headquarters in the Union.
The club is expecting to place
students in booths at advantageous
locations on ,the campus Thurs-
day and Friday of this week in
order to obtain student applications
for absentee,.ballots. i Any students
who may be interested in this work
will meet at the headquarters at 4
o'clock today.
The club is planning to hold mass
meetings at 8 o'clock every Tues-
day evening until the election.
Speakers are being ,obtained to
address the Republican students on
the campus at each of these mass
meetings.
After merging the Hoover and
Republican clubs into one organiza-
tion which has adopted the name
of the latter, the members elected
officers for this year. Harvey

Lodge was chosen president of the
club and Martin Mol was given the

Vachel Lindsay, hailed as Amer-
ica's troubador poet and known as]
the vagabond "rhymster," will give1
a recital of his works at 8 o'clockJ
tomorrow night in Hill auditorium.
With an education and back-
ground rich in training and cul-
ture, he has branched forth in the
past 15 years into a career more
romantic and more intriguing, per-
haps, than any other in American
literature.
By choice and intent, Lindsay1
was first a pen and ink designer3
and later a lecturer on the history
of art. He has often ventured forth
on long vagabond trips into the
South and West. In the summer
of 1912, he walked from his home
in Illinois to New Mexico, distribut-]
ing his "rhymes" as he went and
preaching his "Gospel of Beauty."
He gives his recreations as moving
pictures and taking cross country
walks.
His poetry seems to have caught
an undercurrent of American life
which bespeaks an insight of keen
discriminations, and a life of un-
usual interests.And being an ar-
tist, he has added to his books with
pen and ink drawings.
With the publication of the "Con-
go" his reputation was assured.
Where previously he had been con-
tent to rove from city to city, ex-
POPULATION OF CITY
INCREAES TO 0000
Survey Made By Chamber Of1
Commerce And Public Utility
Officials
UNIVERSITY -IS INCLUDED
The city of Ann Arbor and ad-
jacent territory will have a popu-
lation of approximately 40,000 at
the start of 1929, according to a
survey by O. O. McLeish, Chamber
of Commerce secretary. This figure
includes University students and a
city population of 29,700, the num-
ber of inhabitants estimated for
the opening of 1929.
McLeish made his survey with
the aid of public utility officials.
On Sept. 1, 1927, there were 7,212
active gas meters in use, Charles R.
Henderson of the Washtenaw Gas
Co. reports. One year later the
number had increased to 7,423.
J. J. Kelly, area manager of
Michigan Bell Telephone Co., re-
ports that during the above period
the number of telephones increas-
ed from 9,523 to 9,678. Mr. Kelly
predicts that there will be 10,000
phones in use by the end of the
year, according to the Chamber of
Commerce report.
From Feb. 1, 1928, to Sept. 1, 1928,
there was an increase in use of do-
mestic water meters from 7,001 to
7,260, George S. Vandawarker,
manager of water department re-
ports. During the period from Aug.
31, 1927, to Sept. 1, 1928, Herbert
Silvester of the Detroit Edison Co.,
reports that the number of consu-
mers in the city increased from 7,-
909 to 8,400, or a gain of 6 per cent.
The school census increase from
1920 is shown in the following

changing his rhymes for bread as
he went, after its appearance he
was forced to forsake the open road
for the lecture platform.
His poetic creations, now fantas-
tic, now a mirror for the burly color
and boisterous music of the camp-
meeting, now the scene of a revival
jubilee have met with popular ap-
proval. His earnestness has saved
him from merely producingvaude-
ville entertainment but rather a
blen dof rhymes, ragtime, and re-
ligion.
As he was once a missionary and
a minstrel, singing, chanting, and
reciting for his meals, he will ap-
pear here tomorrow night for the
second time. This appearance,
however, comes as the result of one
cancelled with the Inlander last
spring owing to illness.
TOLSTOY Is HONORED0
IN F ACU1LTYLECTURES'
Program Given In Celebration Of
The 100th Anniversary Of The
Birth Of Tolstoy
FIVE PROFESSORS SPEAK
In celebration of the 100th anni-
versary of the birth of Count Leo
Tolstoy a series of talks were pre-
sented by members of the faculty
yesterday at Natural Science audi-
torium.
Professor J. H. Muyskens who was
the first speaker on the program
said that the primary purpose of
the Tolstoy centenary celebration
was the publishing qf a complete
edition of the great author's works.
"Tolstoy was a product of the
social conditions prevailing in Rus-
sia in the 19th century," said Prof.
P. W. Slosson who spoke next on
Tolstoy's social background. "Ex-
cessive boredom caused Tolstoy to
turn to art and religion as a relief
from the depressing conditions
which were prevalent throughout
the country.
Prof. C. L. Meader, who spoke on
Tolstoy's life, said that the aristo-
cratic environment in which Tol-
stoy was reared was not at all con-
ducive to such liberal ideas in
I which he later displayed such zeal.
Professor Meader added that it was
Tolstoy's great disgust with life
generally that caused him to come
to view it in the way he did.
Prof. P. M. Jack who discussed
Tolstoy's conception of art said
that Tolstoy believed art in writing
consisted in conveying by the writ-
ten word the strong emotions which
are felt by the author. Dr. F. S.
Onderdonk, the last speaker on the
program, discussed Tolstoy's reli-
gion and religious concepts.
Hoover Recommends.
Retention of Tariff
(By Associated Press)
BOSTON, Oct. 15. - Herbert
Hoover struck out at the opposition
here Monday night in a manner
unprecedented in his campaign for
the presidency, assailing in blunt
terms the tariff formula laid down
in the Democratic platform.
Speaking to the country gen-
erally, but to industrial New Eng-
land in particular, the Republican
candidate declared that the ad-
justment of import duties by the
Democratic formula of "effective
competition" would mean a "reduc-
tion of the tariff and a depression
in American wages and American
farm prices."

JUNIOR PRESIDENCY
IN LAW SCHOOL
JUNIOR UTS VOTE TODAY
Architects Choose Hollard As Leader
While Engineers Cast Ballots
For Grunow
Elections were held yesterday in,
the junior classes of the Law and
Dental schools, and the Colleges of
Engineering a n d Architecture.'
Medical sophomores also elected
their officers nforthe coming year.
Today, the juniors in the literary
college will assemble at 4 o'clock
in the Natural Science auditorium
for what promises to be a hotly
contested fight for class officers
and J-Hop committee members.
John H. Vander Wal was elected
president of4the junior law class by
a vote of 48 to 39 over Richard
Maxwell. Karl G. Pearson won the
vice-presidency from Homer E:
Dunlap, 47 to 39. Elliott Moyer lost l
the secretaryship to Stephen Jones,
23 to 63. Vernon Ten Cate beat
Benton B. Wolfe for treasurer, 52 to'
34. Robert Heaney was elected as
the Law J-Hop committeeman with
41 votes, to 20 for Joel K. Riley and
22 for Norman O. Tietj ens. James
Hillard won the presidency of the
junior architects from Stafford
o- - - - -ol

JOHN H. VANDER

F O U R JU N IO R C L A S S ESASM B E T E CTMNO FI L 0 1 C i
MEN TO FIUR| L L OFIE

WAL WINS

POET TO SPEAK
HERE TOMORROW

WILD RUMORS OF INFIDELITY
OF COACH YOST ARE SPIKED
IN MPHATICANNOUNCEMEN
WILDCAT JOURNALISM IS CHARGE
WITH RESPONSIBILITY
FOR FIASCO
Speculation was rife on campus yesterday over the sudd
announcement that Coach Fielding H. Yost, "grand old man"
Michigan football, had left for an indefinite stay in Nashville, Ten
where his brother-in-law, Dan McGuigan, is coach of the Vanderb
university team. Rumors at once began to circulate that the Mic
gan Yostmen were in danger of losing their leader to Vanderb
Yost, in a special announcement last night, however, branded I
rumors as without! foundation, stating that he had gone to Nashvi
on a business trip of a few days' duration and to join his wife, i
Eunice Fite, a former Nashville girl.
According to Tad Wieman, head of the University coach:
staff, -Coach Yost "will probably return to Columbus Saturday to
present at the Michigan-Ohio game," but University sporting circ
were in doubt as to what effect his absence this week will have on t
playing of his team next Saturday.
Coming on the heels of his recent announcement that his coac
ing activities would be confined to the development of passers a
kickers, Coach Yost's departure for Vanderbilt at a crucial mom
in the 1928 football season is interpreted by many alumni and s
dents as significant of a desire to sever athletic relations with Mid
gan, whose teams he has coach

Vachel Lindsay aI
Noted poet, who is to give a re-
cital of his works at 8 o'clock
Thursday night in Hill auditorium.
It was erroneously reported in
Sunday's Daily that Lindsay was
to appear on Tuesday night.
'PHARMA CY STUDENTS
SPONSOR EXHIBITIONS
Observe National Pharmacy Weekj
By Making Displays In Three
Local Drug Stores.
PRESCOTT CLUB IS ACTIVE

JUNIOR CLASS ELECTIONS
Literary, 4 o'clock, Natural j
Science aud.
Tomorrow
Education, 3 o'clock, 207 Tap-
pan hall.
Bus. Ad., 4 o'clock, 207 Tappan I
hall.
Pharmacy, 5 o'clock, 203 I
( Chem. bldg.
To be eligible to vote in the
Junior class elections, a stu-
dent must have at least 56j
I hours and not more than 87
hours of credit, or else four
( semesters in the University,
( exclusive of Summer school.
0- - - - -o
Hodder, 17 to 14. R. F. Outcalt was
elected vice-president over William
Reid, 21 to 11. Calvin Banwell was
elected secretary over Stafford
Hodder 18 to 14 on the final ballot,
after Walter Hickey had been elim-
inated. Roland Yeager was elected
treasurer over Winfield Lott, 18 to
15, after Charles Greenridge had
been eliminated. James B. Richard-
son was elected as the architect's
representative on the J-Hop com-
mittee, receiving 16 votes, to a total
of 17 for three other candidates.
The engineering juniors elected
their officers by acclaim. Robert,
Grunow was named president, The-
odore Will, vice-president, Harry
Coll, treasurer, and George Hol-
brook, secretary. Phillip B. Allen,
Robert S. McCoy and Ludwig Emde,
with 49, 41 and 39 votes respective-I
ly, were elected as the engineers'
representatives on the J-Hop com-
mittee, from a field of nine men.
The sophomore medical class
elected Howard Van Auken as pres-
ident, over Russell Malcom. Fred
Watts beat out Lawrence Dickey
for vice-president. James Mac
Meekin was unanimously elected
treasurer. Maurice Schnitker was
named secretary over Miss Inez
Wilbur.
THE WEATHER
(By Associated Press)
Mostly cloudy and local showers,.
ly cloudy, somewhat warmer in
cooler Wednesday; Thursday slight-
north portions.
Exhibition Contains
Rare Shakespeares
Several valuable and interesting
volumes from the University Libra-
ry's large Shakespearean collection
are included among the books now
on exhibition in the lobby of the
main library. One of the most im-
portant is a copy of the famous
third folio of Shakespeare's plays,
printed in 1664: The library also
hacenac of t+hp ceonnda nd fourth

NEW YORK WELCOMESI
rIi 7 FPPFI IN Pf~

In observance of National Phar- U111111 L L L LL- iI U iLtWsj
macy week, students in the College
of Pharmacy have placed pharma- Manhattan Decorates Its Streets
ceutical exhibitions in show win- In The Colors Of Germany
dows of three local drug stores,A
Calkins and Fletcher on the corner And United States
of South and East University
avenues, the Cratton pharmacy, CROWDS CHEER ECKENER
South State and Packard, and in ._
the Quarry, South State and North (By Associated Press)
University avenue. NEW YORK, Oct. 15.-Two score
National Pharmacy week is ob- of gallant =men who had shown a
served each year in the interest of new way tocommerce of the air by
promoting professional pharmacy. their flight in the Graf Zepplin
The show window exhibits consist from Germany, tonight were the
of stacks of old prescriptions, dif- I guests of an enthuiastic city after
ferent kinds of herbs and other a tumultous welcome in the late
materials. used in the preparation afternoon.
of medicines, and various sorts of The largest city of the land for-
utensils used in the pharmaceutical got its business for a time to hail
laboratory. the crew of the dirigible, symbolic
All students in the pharmacy of a new era in transportation of
school are members of the Prescott passengers and cargo.
club which organization promotes At 5:30 p. m. the visitors were
such actions as the decorations of landing from the Municipal tug the
windows during Pharmacy week. Macom at the Battery, that small
The club also procures renowned: clear space at the tip of Manhat-
men in the field of pharmacy to I tan of which the skyscrapers en-
speak at its monthly meetings, and croach close as they can. Patient
furthers in general the interest in men and women had waited since
that profession on the campus. early morning at the landing and
a chorus of 10,000 voices was on
AFrom Curtis hand to cheer. A light sprinkle of
ApologyF mrain failed to diminish the crowd.
Demanded By Iowans The gray office buildings had
blossomed forth with the flags of
(By Associated Press) the two republics, Germany and
CRESEOS, IOWA, Oct. 16-A sec- the United States, and from their
ond request for an apology from upper stories, as the parade formed
Senator Charles Curtis, Republican and moved up Broadway, came the
candidate for vice-president, be- paper storm which office workers
cause of his reply to Heckler Spen- delight to shower on the heroes
cer, Iowa, was repeated by Dr. J. who pass below them.
W. Reynolds of Creseos, national The mounted patrolmen cavorted
Democratic committeeman from ahead of. the automobiles bearing
Iowa, in a letter mailed to the sen- the city's guests and behind march-
ator today. ed army and navy detachments.

and whose prestige he has exter
ed for more than 25 years. Whe
er his action is due to disappoi
ment at the poor showing the V
verines have made so far this s
son is =problematical, but his "pr(
able" return in time to see the
lumbus game indicates that
squad will not be without his le
ership.
Coach Yost has been associa
with several minor business ent
prises around Nashville and w
the Cumberland Valley Natk
Bank. Before taking up coach:
he spent,more than 10 years in b
iness in Tennessee. His declarat
yesterday was to the effect that
visit with his sister and brother-
law was incidental to his bush
purposes.
Wild rumors of Yost's immed
resignation to accept a big job
Vanderbilt which spread yester
were based on yesterday aft
noon's Detroit Times' false in
ences from an article published
yesterday morning's Chicago T
une, which stated merely that
veteran mentor had left Ann Ar
for Vanderbilt where he would
as he did last year, his brother
law in coaching the Commod
during his stay.
MR. In Pt At CON VENTI1
TO OPEN TOM'ORRI

table:
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
11926
1927
1928

.....................

.4,366
.4,462
.4,647
.4,750
.4,982
.5,032
. 5,176
.5,304

.................. 5,547

RUM, CANINE FIGHT CHAMPION,
NOW HAS SEVERAL CHALLENGERS

Intramural dog fights will be on
the sports program this year if
authorities comply with popular
demand. Rum, a Great Dane from
State street, has in the past man-
aged to discourage all other hounds
from hopes for the all-campus
laurel, but this year a few likely
newcomers have threatened to de-
pose the State street terror from
his throne.
At present there are three pos-
sible prospects. The Washtenaw
Whelp, a large Russian wolfhound
whose gentle manner might be
made more bellicose; Bob Henry,
a gigantic Newfoundland from the
rinintc nf nf rland avenue. who is

should go into training immediat a
ly. The place for the title boutj
will probably be in front of thel
main library where the stand used
,by the band at the Senior sings last
spring will be reerected. This will
allow a capacity crowd to attend
and has the added of, its proximity
to the Health service.
Authorities state that the odds
on Bob Henry have dropped from
even to 5 to 3 against him since he
suffered the reverse at the hands
of Heinz. The latest report as to
his condition say that he is rest-
ing easily and the crisis has passer4
Rum, the defender, knocked dow
three police-dog sparring partners

i
E
r
,IIIIII
.
.'
r
:3

"Lack of central organization
and direction in campus dramatics
is a fairly sad commentary on the
dramatic situation at Michigan to-
day," opines Prof. 3. L. Brumm,
head of the department of journal-
ism, who suggests that the estab-
lishing of a director of dramatics,
and an organized staff for the
correlation of dramatic interests,
would prevent the present dissipa-
tion of effort and make possible'
constructive criticism of what is
being done in this field of activity.
"Though Michigan probably has
a grater variety of dramatic in-
terests than almost any school of,
like standing in the country,"
Professor Brumm goes on to point
out, "the lack of correlation of
these interests means hap-hazard
effort, and a lack of any construc-
tive criticism for those engaged in
I the work."
I "A rntra nro'reannizatian headed

The director would have to be a
university officer, and not an of-
ficer of any particular department,
Professor Brumm adds. He would
be interests in the development of
play writing and producing, not as
campus activities, but as fields of'
speculation for the students inter-
ested in drama and the theater.
Smith Enthusiasts
Will Rally Tonight
Local backers of the Smith for
President movement will meet to-
night at 8:00 o'clock in the Union
to rally in support of their candi-
date. Carl A. Lehman, local attor-
ney, sent by the Washtenaw county
Democratic committee, and three
students will take the stump in be-
half of Governor Smith.
Announcement will be made by
Leo T. Norville, '31, at whose behest
+he niih was called toether of

BRUMM DECLARES THAT CAMPUS
DRAMATICS NEED ORGANIZATION

Opening its eighth annual co:
vention here tomorrow, the Mict
gan Interscholastic Press associ
tion will begin a three day sessio
when its members, high scho
journalists, begin arriving for reE
istration at 1 o'clock at the Unic
A general assembly in the Unic
ball room at which Dean John
Effinger and Prof. J. L. Brummw
be the principal speakers. J. Step
art Hooker, '29, will welcome t
delegates to the convention.
-hThe convention has been held
the spring heretofore but at
business meeting "last year it w
decided to change the date to ear
fall. The convention of high scho
editors and business managers
sponsored by Sigma Delta Chi, mi
tional professional journalistic fr
ternity, and theĀ° department
journalism of the University. The
Sigma Phi, national honorary jot
nalistic sorority, is also active
the program of the meeting.
Delegates will be housed in fn
ternity and sorority houses on t
campus during their three day vi
and will be entertained at a co
vention banquet on Friday nig
and a luncheon Saturday noon.
Saturday the delegates will1
guests of the Athletic Associati
at the Ohio State-MichiganI
game.
The committee in charge of I
convention program is composed
George E. Simons, '30, gene
chairman, George C. Tilley. '30,
charge of rooming, Charles S. Mc

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