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October 16, 1928 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-16

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

TUESDAY, O(

ICS,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, 0 'C'

".

DAILYOFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the Presi-
dent until 3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday.)

I Vol. 39

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1928

No. 20.

Faculty Directories:
The Faculty Directories for the current year are now ready for
distribution at the office of the Secretary of the University, Room 3,
University Hall.
Ira M. Smith, Registrar
Dr. Kartzke's Lecture:
The Michigan Daily mistakenly announced Dr. Kartzke's lecture for
last week. Dr. Kartzke will speak on Friday of this week (October 19)
at 4:15 o'clock in the University High School Auditorium. His topic is
"Educational Tendencies in Germany." The public is invited.
Will instructors in Education please announce this lecture in theirI
classes Wednesday and Thursday.
C. O. Davis, Secretary
Students of College of Literature, Science, and the Arts:
No course may be taken up after the present week.
W. R. Humphreys, Assistant Deanr
Freshmen Hygiene Lecture:
The first freshmen lecture in hygiene for men, will be given
in Waterman Gymnasium, Thursday and Friday, October 18 and 19, at
3-4 and 5 p. m. This requirement includes all freshmen in the regular
physical training classes and others that have been excused from these
classes.
G. A. May
Economics 51 and 52:
Make up examinations Friday, October 19, 3 to 6 p. m., in Room
201 Ec. for those who had to be absent from the final in June.
Carroll H. May
Gymnasium Classes:I
No gymnasium classes will meet today at 3 o'clock.
Ethel McCormick

Notice:
will not be in
day and Thursday.

my, office in the Health Service Tuesday, Wednes-
Pleaseconsult Dr. Sappington.
Margaret Bell, M. D.

Athena Literary Society:
Additional tryouts will be held in the Athena room on the fourth
floor of Angell Hall at 7:30 p. m., Tuesday, October 16. Speeches may
be on any subject and three minutes in length.
Doris M. Hicks, President
Intramural Cross Country:
Men interested in running cross country for their respective classes
are requested] to report to the Frosh Squad for the nine required trial
runs. There will be further instructions when respective class officers
are appointed.
P. R. Seidel
Transportation Club:
Short business meeting Wednesday, 7:30 p. m., Room 1213 East
Engineering Building.. All students interested in any form of trans-
portation please attend.
Clarke Harris, President
Municipal Administration Club:
A meeting of the Municipal Administration Club will be held Tues-
day evening, October 16, at 7:00, in the Bureau of Government (2035
Angell Hall.)
All persons interested in municipal work, or taking courses in
Municipal Government are invited to attend.
E. C. Mathivet, President
Varsity Band:
The band will have a drill at Ferry Field at 4:30 p. m. today.
N. D. Falcone, Director.
Web and Flange:
There will be a meeting Tuesday evening, October 16, at 7:30 at the
Michigan Union. New members will be elected at this time. All members
are requested to attend.
H. L. Byrne, Rec.
Alpha Nu:
Alpha Nu, national debating society of Kappa Phi Sigma, will hold
its regular weekly meeting Tuesday, October 16, at 7:30 in the Alpha
Nu room.
Professor Pollock of the Political Science department will address
the society relative to his recent experience in Europe. An open forum
will follow.
Visitors and freshmen interested in membership are cordially wel-
come.
John Webster, President
Faculty Women's Club:
The first regular meeting of the Faculty Women's Club will be held at
the Union on Tuesday, October 16, from 3:00 to 5:00 o'clock. It will be a
,reception in honor of the new women of the faculty who are eligible to
club membership.
Mrs. W. L. Badger
Hillel Smoker:
The Hillel Foundation Smoker will be held in the Masonic Temple
on Tu'esday evening, October 16, rather than the place originally
announced.
Adolph H. Fink, Director
Michigan Dames:
The Michigan Dames Club will meet at 8 o'clock Tuesday, October
16, at the Faculty Women's Clubhouse, 226 South Inglls street. The
wives of all students are invited to attend.
Mrs. C. W. Ferris, President
Tolstoy Centennial:
Professors J. H. Muyskens, P. W. Slosson, C. L. Meader, P. M. Jack,
and Dr. F. S. Onderdonk will speak on Tolstoy's significance Tuesday,
October 16, at 4:15, in Natural Science Auditorium.
Tolstoy Centenary Committee
Portia Literary Society:
Initiation will be held at Helen Newberry 7:30 p. m., on Wednesday,
Oct. 17. All old and new members are requested to be present.
Nellie C. Becker, Pres.
All Campus Horseshoe Tournament.
All students desiring to enter this tournament sign the horseshoe
register in the2hall of Waterman Gymnasium. Entries begin Oct. 16
and close Oct. 22.
Intramural Department
University of Michigan Republican Club:
The consolidated Hoover-Curtis and University of Michigan Repub-
lican Clubs will hold a mass meeting in Rooms 319-325 Michigan Union
on Tuesday evening, October 16, at 8 p. m.
Interested faculty members and Michigan men and women from
their respective States are urged to attend.
There are many important committee-ships to be filled. Now is the
time to affiliate with the National Republican Organization of which
this club is subsidiary.
L. Harvey Lodge, President
Martin Mol, Executive Vice Pres.
1.k~

American marines in Nicaragua are busy setting up ballot boxes
in remote sections in preparation for the coming Nicaraguan presi-
dential election November 4. Picture shows ballot boxes loaded on a
pack mule for transportation to mountainous section where there
are no roads.
FORMER CHIEF OF SECRET SERVICE
DIES AFTER BEING ILL TWO WEEKS

Senior Election Trouble?
arines! Here's How Th

Mr. Dodge's Freshman Group, No. 65:
Will members of my Freshman Group see me sometime before Fri-
day afternoon of this week.
S. L. Dodge
Seniors:
It is imperative that you make your Michiganensian picture ap-
pointment immediately. The business office on the second floor of the
Press building is open every afternoon from 1 to 5, and upon payment
here of $3.00 you are in a position to make your appointments with
anyone of the four official photographers, namely, Dey, Randall, Rent-
schler, or Spedding. $2.00 of this amount will be allowed by the photo-
graphers on any private order which may be given before Christ-
mas. Act now, and get a convenient appointment.
Thomas.Thomas, Managing Editor {
All Women Students:
An open meeting of the Women's League at which Dr. Little will be
thq speaker will be held on Tuesday, October 16, at 7:15 p. in., in the
Michigan Union Ballroom. An informal reception in Dr. Little's honor
will follow his talk. Every woman student is cordially invited to attend.
Mary J. White, President
Organ Recital:
Palmer Christian, University organist, will give the following pro-
gram in Hill Auditorium, Wednesday afternoon at 4:15 o'clock. The
general public, with the exception of small children, is cordially invited
to attend. No admission charge. Handel: (1685-1759) Largo ("Xerxes")';
Krebs: (1713-1780) Trio; Gluck (1714-87); Lento ("Orpheus"); Bach:
(1685-1750) Toccata and Fugue in D minor; DeLamarter: Nocturne,.
The Fountain, Legend, (A Chinese Garden, MS.); Boex: Marche Cham-
petre; Karg-Elert: Benediction; Vierne: Finale (SymphonyAD.
Charles A. Sink
All Men of Buftialo and Vicinity:
Scalp and Blade invites all Buffalo men and those living in the
immediate vicinity to attend a smoker Wednesday night, October 17,
at 8:00 at the Michigan Union.
Clifford Keene, Secretary
Orchesis:
Orchesis will meet Wednesday, Oct. 17, at 7:15, in the Women's
Athletic Building. Members please see bulletin board in Barbour
Gymnasium for group assignments.
Jeannette Saurborn
Adelphi Special Program:
Tuesday evening Professor Preston Slosson will address the House
on "Political Campaigns of the Past." An opportunity for questions and
discussion will be afforded afterwards.
Those will tryout who are named on the bulletin board in Uni-
versity hall. Membership committee will notify those who have been
accepted for initiation this week. All members should inspect the bul-
letin board.
Robert H. Lloyd, Speaker
Scabbard and Blade:
Will all Scabbard and Blade men from other companies and all
Alumni of this Chapter leave their addresses and telephone numbers
at R. O. T. C. headquarters this week.
M. Scudded Griffing
Alpha Kappa Delta:
Members of Alpha Kappa Delta will meet at the home of Dr. Wood
3 Harvard Place, this evening, at 7:30. It is especially important that
all members be present.
R. D. MacNitt, President
litli11 1111 Il11111#11111111111111111111 1 11111111 11 1111111111 I III11I1lI IIII~ 111liii I':
The
Michiganensian
Rates among the finest of university an-
nals at present, the seniors are being
photographed as rapidly as possible, that
this section may be completed in the -!
allotted time, Nov. 15, just four more
weeks. A comnlete line of
frames for your se~
Phone 5031 for an appointment lection.
CI-
P " 1 rr'nlp

(By Associated Press)
LARCHMONT, N. Y., Oct. 15-
William James Flynn, for years the
nemesis of counterfeiters, spies,
anarchists and other offenders
against the federal government,
died Sunday after two weeks ill-
ness with heart disease.
IFrom 1897 to 1918 he was a
member of9the secret seervice, the
last four years as its chief. Dur-
ing one war year he was in charge
of protecting the nation's railroads
and from 1919 to 1921 he headed
the bureau of investigation of the
department of justice.
He was born Nov. 18, 1867, in
New York. At the age of 26 he
forsook the plumbers' trade be-
cause he found it too dull and be-
came a keeper in the Ludlow St.
jail, where all federal prisoners
were then held. He utilized his
contacts to obtain an insight into
the criminal mind and when in
1897 he joined the secret service he
achieved quick success.
Within two years he was put at
the head of the Pittsburgh divi-
sion and a year later was moved to
New York in charge of the eastern
division, remaining for 11 years.
In October, 1910, he obtained a
Ileave of absence and became sec-

Tell It To The
ey Work Those Things

Purdue Lunchrooms
Used To Teach Girls
Refuting the contention that
girls learn nothing of practical
value in American colleges is a
student lunchroom innovation es-
tablished recently at Purdue.
A lunchroom in the home eco-
nomics building has been establish-
ed as a, laboratory for 29 girls tak-
ing a home economics course. The
girls are given practice in institu-
tion management by planning the
menus, preparing large quantities
of food, marketing, and organiza-
tion. They are required each day
to meet and solve the problems
which naturally come up in actual
business.
The experiment is proving very
much of a success for as many as
300 people a meal offer testimony
to the cooking ability and service
of the co-eds.
COUNCIL GOVERNS
SATURDAY DANCES
Dances in fraternity houses last
Saturday night were governed for
the first time by the rules based
upon resolutions passed by the In,
terfraternity presidents' discussion
group and approved by the frater-
nities through the medium of the
Interfraternity council.
The rules as adopted are as
follows:;
(1) That the University should
require all fraternity dances held
on Saturday nights after football
games to be strictly closed, I. e.,
attendance shall be limited to ac-
tive members, pledges and alumni
only, except that the chaperone
need not be a member of the fra-
ternity.
(2) That the chaperone must
be either a member of the Univer-
sity Senate or a parent of a mem-
ber of the active chapter.
(3) After the party the house
president shall turn in a full re-
port, giving the number of people
in attendance at the party, stating
whether or not difficulty was had
with uninvited guests, whether or
not there was any trouble of any
kind during the party, and includ-
ing suggestions for improvement in
handling future dances. This re-
port shall be signed by both the
house president and the chaperone.
Former Student Was
Olympic Contestant
It has just been revealed that
John Kenneth Doherty, of Detroit,
winner of third place in the de-
cathlon at the recent Amsterdam
Olympics, was a student in the
School of Education at the Univer-
sity of Michigan last semester and
finished his training for the Olym-
pic games on old Ferry field.

ond deputy police commissioner of
New York, but resigned the next
April. His friends said it was be-
cause he would not brook political
interference with his work. Again
in September, 1912, he obtained a
leave to aid in the investigation
which followed the Rosenthal mur-
der for which Police Lieutenant
Charles Becker was electrocuted.
In December, 1913, he was ap-
pointed chief of the secret serevice.
He used his men to aid in running
down German spies in 1917, but
resigned in 1918 because Attorney
General Gregory had limited the
activities of the secret service too
much for him.
After a year policing and guard-
ing railroads, he took charge of the
department of justice's bureau of
investigation, bringing about the
deportation of Emma Goldman,
Alexander Berkman and other agi-
tators. He had charge of the in-
vestigation of the Wall St. bomb
explosion. He was supplanted by;
Attorney General Daugherty with
William J. Burns.
Since then he conducted a pri-
vate detective agency, published a
weekly crime fiction periodical and
amused himself in the vegetable
garden of his home here.

I

-1

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1

0

l =1
To launder perfectly it is not
sufficient to remove the ap-
parent discolorations. Even =M
-more important is it that
clothes are thoroughly
r ' Sterilized, Varsity
Laundry processes insure
perfect SANITATION and
are a valuable safeguard to
health. -
Phone 4219
_ w
T14E

w

rr

hat good
a degree
anyhow

iS

if your health has been
impaired? It's a bigger
asset to you than your
education - and it's easy
to safeguard. You will
find that it pays to make
every breakfast include
Sre ded

I

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