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October 16, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-16

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1928

TIDE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE FIVE

TUSDY OTBEĀ®6,198TH ICA N ALYPGEFV

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ANNO'UNCE CHAIRMAN "PORGY" DEPICTS
REAL NEGRO LIFE
FORf ANNUAL INNBy M. F.
"Porgy," the Theatre Guild play
which is to be presented under the
Scholarship And Athletic Cups auspices of Michigan women on
October 30 at the Whitney theater,
Will Be Presented is a part of an artistic renaissance
At Banquet that is going on in the South to-
day. According to Heywood Broun,
WILL BE HELD IN UNION dramatic critic on the New York
World, Dubose' Heywood led the
Flora Sutcliffe '29 has been an- way with a magnificent novel.
nounced as the chairman of the There is humor in the book, but
Heywood never makes his negroes
annual Pan-Hellenic dinner, which funny. He is sensitive to their emo-
is held every year in the Union. tions and understands to the full
Her assistants, chairmen of the the "tragedy of his characters."
various committees, have been an- Mr. Heyward is only one of a
nounced as the following: chair- number of voices that are drawing
man of tickets, Lois Woodruff; popular attention of the day to-
chairman of guests, Isabel Hub- ward the South. It has been said
bard; chairman of features and that this Southern renaissance may
programs, Margaret Moore; chair- mark the end of the Reconstruc-
man of decorations, Helen Korten- tion era, so marked an actualitI
hoff; chairman of menu and scen- has it become and so widespread
ery, Edna Richards. has been its effects. "Porgy" and
The Pan-Hellenic dinner is a I "In Abraham's Bosom are tw
traditional affair held every fall distinctly different expressions of
and is 'attended by all sorority negro life. "The difference between
members. In recent years the' din- C'In Abraham's Bosom' and 'Por-
ner has been held at the Michigan gy'" said an Ann Arbor critic. "is
Union. It is at this time that the that 'In Abraham's Bosom' depicts
cup for scholarship is awarded to the conflict between the negro whc
the sorority which has had the is half-white and half-black, while
highest scholastic standing duringI 'Porgy' is a story of the real life
the previous year. Cups which have of negroes, their loves, their hates
been won in other fields of activi- their hopes, and desires, but all as
ties such as athletics are also pre- one member of one race to anoth.
sented at this time. er. Although the bits of music in
It is also a custom of this annual the first play were most charming
dinner for' President Clarence Cook the negro spirituals ePorgy'tare
Little to address they sorority wom- undoubtedly the most beautifu
en gathered there. The address everto be combined with any
at last year's affair was on the play.
"Auto Ban." During this address World War devoted himself to the
President Little took occasion to task of organizing the negroes in
commend the women for the stand South Carolina. He is a man whose
they had taken on the liquor ques- devotion to literature and to writ-
tion, and also for the successful ing impelled him to give up a bus-
work they had done in the matter iness after fifteen years of devel-
of self-government. oping it. His first full-length nov-
At this dinner the various soror- el, "Mamba's Daughter," comes
ities each occupy a long candle-lit from the press this month.
table and at the conclusion of the In 1923, he maried Dorothy Hart-
dinner each sorority sings one of zell Kuhns, a professional play-
its songs. wright and co-author of "Porgy."
Mr. Heyward refers to his wife as
I "the dramatist of the family." The
UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB Carolina low country, of which
Charleston is the chief city, pro-
There will be a meeting of l vides the setting for "Porgy." Re-
the University Girl's Glee club I ality and a true representation of
at 4:30 today at the School | the Southern negro is the keynote
{ of Music. All members are 1iof the play.
I expected to be present. Please I
bring Michigan Song books. 1
NOTICE PORTIANS PERMANENT
Initiation for Portia Literary 'W V ES
society has been postponed to 7:30
O'clock Wednesday to avoid con- , of Distinction
flict with the address for women
students to be given tonight by i
President Clarence, C. Little. $ 5
________A$5

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LEAGUE MAS MEETING MICHIGAN GROUP VISITS PRESSA R
NU-SS NCUDD N ONGH AT COLOGNE ON OPEN ROAD TOUR
jl Tonight at 7:15 is the timej-
that has been set for the mass Marking the visit of the Michi- of the world showing the news
meeting of members of the gan group of the Open Road tour cables. The mechanical device that
Theme Of Decorations For Affair Women's league. The meet- (to Cologne was the opportunity to translates the code and types it on
ing will take place i the ball- see the International Press exhibi- ticker-tape fascinated me. This
And For Entertainmen t ein e ion or Pressa, as it is caedin tape is then cut off and pasted on
Are Not Disclosed Clarence Cook Little will talk German. This. exhibition asted the message sheets. On another
to the women about campus from May to October of this year, map it was also demonstrated by1
DATE SET FOR OCTOBER 26 1 problems from an adminis- and gave "evidence of an ultra- means of circles of tiny lights how
__trative point of view. After modern spirit of enterprise land news spread from a center to the
Freshman and Sophomore nurses ( President Little's talk every- creative desire." surrounding community."
will receive invitations to the Soph- i one will have an opportunity The extent of the exhibition was The most of modern printing
omore Spread, to be held Oct. 26, I to meet him personally. so great that it was impossible for presses were included in the ex-
for the first time since this eventj i ( (the group to see any but the more hibition. Papers were printed in
became an annual affair for the, - important and interesting ,tions German and distributed to, those
Freshman and Sophomore women of the exhibition. One of these who attended the exhibition. There
an the campus. This is following sections depicted the development was also a miniature model of a
the idea inaugurated last Spring of civilizations, in a series of his- perfectly equipped modern news-
when the nurses were invited to toric scenes worked out with min- paper plant. All the departments
the Freshman Pageant. This was iature figures. Peoples of all parts were shown and the process of the
done in the hope of more closely INT IUU UUUILIIof the world and in ages were used, modern plant was pictured by min-
uniting the women of the Nursing and their development traced from iature figures that moved about
School and the women in the Lit- Senior Society held its initiation primitive times to modern. Scenes running toy machinery.'
3rary college. yesterday at 4:30 in the red room of many famous battles formed ' Most of the important newspa-
It was decided at the meeting of of Martha Cook dormitory. The part of this exhibition. pers of the world, including many
the spread committee held Mon- society is a local honorary sorority There was also a demonstration of the United States', had display
'ay afternoon in the parlours of for senior women who have held a of how the first paper was produc- booths. Various American college
Barbour gymnasium not to dis- high record in scholastic and ex- ed by hand labor, and models of newspapers were exhibited and
,lose the theme of decoration and tra-curricular activities. The list old printing presses, each irefre- several journalistic departments of
the plans for the evening's enter- of initiates for this year is as fol- senting a stage in the development American universities had displays.
tainment at the present time, lows. Lucile Beresford, Julia of the modern press. These presses The development of photography
Helen Wilson, chairman of fin- Ferguson, Edna Mower, Mary were operated by men dressed in was another very interesting sec-
Hnce announced that the dues for Ptolemy, Janette Sauborn, Ber- costumes suitable to the period to tion.
e an Sredand So neice Shook, and Joseephine Welch which the press belonged. Gutten- In the exhibition grounds, which
he Fres whichpead and Soph- A dinner at the Cosy Corner tea berg's original press was included were very beautiful and extensive,
re used to partly defray the x room followed the initiation. A in the exhibition, as well as the vas a church built in futuristic
ense o thres y two r spho e x- 'long banquet table facing the fire- original Guttenberg Bible. There style. It is built of bronze plates
penses of these two sophomore an place had as a center piece a was a collection of books, maga- and the windows are of modern
the week at all -league houses, so- bouquet of fall flowers, and a cor- zines,.- and newspapers, from the stained glass. On the altar is a
rorities and dormitories, sage for each initiate was placed most ancient to the most modern. figure of Christ on the cross, done
_r______nrm__ries at her cover. The programs and j Famous editions of hand-illumi- in this futuristic style. The whole
menus were designed by Virginia nated books were included in the effect is one that clashes with con-
SOCIETY TO HOLD Reid, an active, and bore the in- collection. ventional ideas of a reverent set-
SECOND TRYOUTS signia of the society. "Another interesting display," ting, according to Miss Lytle.
Betty Smithers extended the wel- said Miss Mary Lytle, director of
Mummers dramatic society will come to the initiates and a reply Betsy Barbour and leader of the Subscribe to the Michigan Daily,
hold second tryouts thisaternn was made by Julia Ferguson. Michigan group, "was a relief map $4.00 the year. It's worth it!
from 3 to 5 on the fourth floor ="'a as antB1annanm
)f Angell hall in the Adelphi room. L orh feat rhonn
Plans for this year include the Le
presenting of plays to local clubs = 300 S. State St.
at their meetings and the study of (Cor. Liberty and State)
one-act plays and the playwrights. E
It is the custom for this society MARCELLING, FACIAL
to present One-act plays through- MRELN AIL
out %the year for private perform- MANICURING,
ances. This is the only organiza- SHAMPOOING
tion of its kind on campus as (=FINGER WAVING
Masques, the other dramatic or- ;= Mrs. N. M. Hitchcock, Mgreo
ganization for women, was dis- = Open Evenings Dial 2-1411,. Business Man Luncheon.
solved last year. t!!11!1!!!!!!!1 !!!!!!!!!!!!!![!!!!!iu 1 !uo
----Evening Dinner ..........65

BRING LETTERS EARLY
IS ADVISOR'S RQUS
All women students who are
planning to go to Columbus for the
Ohio State game are urged by Miss
Alice Lloyd, adviser of women, to
bring their parents' letters of per-
mission to the Advisers' office as
soon as possible. These letters have
been slow in coming in, according
to Miss Lloyd, and she would ap-
preciate having as many as pos-
sible before Thursday noon.
In order that the Advisers may
arrange with the railroad company
for accommodations for the women
planning to take special trains to
Columbus, women are asked to let
Miss Lloyd know whether they are
going to the game by train or some
other means.
Two special trains are to be run
to Columbus for the game. The
first leaves Ann Arbor at 10:30
o'clock (eastern time) Friday night
arriving in Columbus early Satur-
day morning, and returns at 10:30
o'clock Saturday night, reaching
Ann Arbor early Sunday. The sec-
ond special is scheduled to leave
Ann Arbor at 7:30 o'clock Saturday
morning and will unload two or
three blocks from the stadium in
Columbus. This train will reload
at the Union depot at 7 o'clock Sat-
urday night and will reach Ann
Arbor at midnight.
Round trip railroad fare, $5.
~~rria r1op

11

_ , - _ _ _

THE QUALITY
HEMSTITCHING SHOP

Music from 5:30 to 7:30
Steaks, Chops, Oysters

Alterations and Dressmaking
We take your orders for Hand-
Embroidered Handkerchiefs
Choose your Costume Jewelry
from our stock
KLENZONA CLEANS CLOTHES
OVER CRIPPEN'S DRUG STORE

WE SERVE

Atmosphere adds so much to
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eating in our new shop.
Special attention given to
Private Parties
Now located at
514 E. Jefferson
Next to Jefferson Apts.
Near State
(Irtjjn

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that are different, at the
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227 So. State

Michigan
Beauty Shoppe
For Appointment Dial 3083

Italian Spagtetti Dinners on Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday

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Store opens
8:30 A. M.

Store closes
5:30 P. M.

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desired colors for daytime
dresses--ensembles in chokers,
earrings, rings, pins and
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Sparkling, brilliant jewelry
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Colors and gay prints in Irish
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White hankies of Irish linen
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Narrow hems-special at 29c.
Preferred hose in the right
shades for autumn. Satisfy-
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