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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1928 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. b

+. . u ". v a a a v a- a L/. c . . Y °: - a~. aa a )_ W a .CJ
I ___________

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Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The .Associated Press is exclusively en-
ttled to the use for republication of allnews
dispatches credited to it nr not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
,lished herein.
Entered at the postoice at Ann Abor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mal,
$450.
Offies: Ansn Arbor Press Building, My-
Inard Street..
Phones: Editorial, 425 ;Busies, 2214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor.....................Paul J. Kern
City Editor...............Nelson J. Smith
News Editor.. ...... Richard.. C..Kurvink
Sprts Editor...... .....Morris uin
Womens Editor.......Sylvia S. tone
Editor Michigan Weekly. JStewart Hooker
Music and Drama..........R. L. Askren
Assistant City Editor.. .Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
Clarence N. Edelson Charles S. Monroe
aosephE. Howell Pierce Rosenberg
Donald J. Kline George E. Simons
George C. Tilley
Reporters
Paul _I. Adams; Ruth Kelsey'
Morris Alexander Donald E. Layman
Esther Anderson C. 'A. Lewis
C. A. Askren Leon Lyle
Bertram Askwith Marian MacDonald
Fenelon Boesche flenry Merry
Louise Behymer N.~ S. Pickard
Arthur Bernstein William Post
Isabel Charles Victor Rabinowitz
L. R. Chub John T. Russ
Laura Codling Harold Saperstei.
Frank E. Cooper Rachel Shearer
Helen Domine Howard Simon
Edward Efroymson Robert L. Sloss
Douglas Edwards Arthur R. Strubel
Valborg Egeand Beth Valentine
Robert J. Feldman Gurney Williams
Marjorie Follmer Walter Wilds
Oscar Fuss Fdward Weinman
William Gentry Robert Woodroofe
Tom Gillett Joseph A. Russell
Lawrence Hartwig Cadwell Swanson
Willis Jones A. Stewart
Richard Jung Edward L. Watner Jr.
Charles R.. Kaufman Cleland Wyllie
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
Advertising............ .Alex K. Scherer
Advertising ...........A.. James Jordan
Advertising.......... Carl W. Hammer
Service..........Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation..............George S. Bradley
Accounts. ...........Lawrence E. Walkley
Publications............. Ray M. Hofelich
Assistants
Irvi g Binzer George R. Haniton
Mary Chase Dix Humphrey
Jeanette Dale Bernard Larson
Vernr DavisLenrLiteou
'Helen Geer LoadLtljh
Kasper Haverson T olliste ca,
Agnes here, r Carl Schemm
lack Horwitch Robert Scoville
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1928
Night Editor-Clarence Edelson
IN RECOGNITION
An excellent practice and one
worthy of commendatiop is that
which was inaugurated by the Uni-
(rersity last fall when it acted as
host to thousands of Michigan
high school students at the open-
ing game of the football season.
Similar invitations were extended
again this year and the eagerness
with which they were accepted was
well attested by the exceptionally
good opening day crowd that
watched yesterday's Ohio Wesley-
an-Michigan game.
That the University has an ath-
letic plant such that it can each
year invite possible Michigan stu-
dents to visit Ann Arbor on one of
the gala Saturday's of the year is
indeed, fortunate and is often
praised. But that it does recognize
the possibilities that these facili-
ties afford is of equal importance
and equally deserving of mention.
To say the least, many worth-

while students, future Michigan
men and women, are given an op-
portunity to visit the University
with a football game the chief ex-
cuse for their coming. This oppor-
tunity, once accepted, often serves
to aid an undecided high school
seenior to choose the university
best suited to his needs.
As followed this year, the prac-
tice is most commendable. Still it
might be that the University with
a little extra effort and foresight
could arrange something more in
way of entertainment and recep-
tion such that high school visitors
next fall, in many cases looking at
Michigan through critical eyes,
could see a little more of the Uni-
versity during their stay here and
perhaps retain a little better mem-
ory of courtesy extended and inforl
mation secured that would react to
the credit of the University as a
whole as well as to its members.
0
Well, anyway, Michigan can get
together with Notre Dame and
Navy for a great big post mortem
over their rather unusual down-+
falls yesterday.r
Many persons held their breathi
yesterday as the new drum major
approached the goal-post between

OASTED ROLL
"i
IT SEEMS
THEY PLAYED
A GAME
WE KNOW THAT IT isn't right
to make fun of the dear old foot-
ball team especially after what all
the teams of the past have done for
Michigan, but then there were
some strikingly funny . things in
that game.
. * * ,
ONE OF THE FUNNIEST was
that we came 250 miles to see this
game with Ohio Wesleyan, because
we thought it would be the only
game the team would win this
year, but they fooled us.
* *
AND LAST WEEK WE gave the
Chicagoans the razz for losing to
a little southern team. There is
some consolation in the "B" team,
however, for they gave us an even
break. We have that much on
Stagg, both his teams lost.
* * *
THEN WE HEAR THAT Yost has
resigned again. We don't like to
say much about this but we have
an idea the famous coach took a
look at the team in practice and
gave up. We give him credit for
being a good judge of horse flesh.
* * *
BUT NEVER MIND, that same
team may beat Illinois, Ohio, Wis-
consin, Iowa, Indiana and any
other opponents. LET'S ALL
PRAY FOR THEM.
* * *
ON FALL FEVER
By
Tap Faucet
Author of Many Other Works.
Sing ye a song of co-eds-
Of colors bright and fair,
Of marvelous complexion
And most seductive hair-
Cheeks that rival peaches bloom,
Lips of heart's desire;
Of eyes that plead with longing,
Or burn with Love's own fire
How can mere mortals study
When Godesses like these-
In diaphanous regalia
Display their pretty knees?
L'envoi
O, the drug stores reap a harvest,
And beauty parlors fill-
While we like eager suckers
Go riding for a spill.
(Editor's note, by Tap Faucet,
himself). We fear Tap has turned
misogynist-perhaps a mid-sum-
mer's episode has seared his open
heart. Let it remain for our balmy
skies and dimpled co-eds to remove
the gnawing canker in his breast.
* .* .*
AND TO FILL UP this column
which we are writing for Three
Star because he broke his head or
something, we print a story that
the editor of Toasted Rolls wrote.
It is interesting but not funny-
the only funny thing about it is
that Three Star thought he could
sell the story and couldn't. Here
it is:
* * *
ANN ARBOR, MICH., Oct. 5-
Thirty-one years ago the Battling
Bishops from Ohio Wesleyan
journeyed to Ann Arbor to meet
the Michigan Wolverines in a grid
battle. The game ended a score-
less tie, largely through the efforts
of a certain officious appearing
tackle in the little institution's
line-up who proved to be as effic-
ient as he was officious. Time after

time he would take out the whole
side of the opposing Maize and
Blue line, making them black and
blue; just as often he would re-
primand one of his mates and
threaten. to bench him, even if his
squad had to play on without a
substitute, for there was none
available.
That tackle was Fielding H. Yost,
now known as "Hurry Up" Yost
and coach of the famous Michigan
"point-a-minute" teams of the first
decade of the century.
Yost was the paid mentor of the
Ohioans at that time, but his ma-
terial was so limited that he had
to fill in as the eleventh man in
that memorable battle.
The student publication here of
that date describes the game thus:
"Hair-pulling, choking, and bruis-
ing tactics were unavailing for
both sides and the game ended in
a blank score."
* * *

About
BO(
THE ETERNAL SPIRIT OF THE
BUFFOON
Somewhere in the literature of
every nation there lies the expres-
sion of the spirit of buffoonery.
The eternal spirit of bragadoccio,
of pleasant exaggeration, of con-
quest high and usually impossible,
seems to prevade the literature of
all times. It makes the best of
reading-it whiles away hours, and
leaves, together with the feeling of
time well-spent, an impression of
the spirit of the people among
whom these heroes moved and with
whom they had their contacts.
Tyl Ulenspeigel and Panurge
stand before us always as the ideal
creations in this kind of literature.
Their mighty deeds swell some-
times into the fantastic, but al-
ways-they are the deeds of mighty
men, with mighty strength, and
with minds as nimble as their
muscles are supple. And in the new
study "Francois Villon"* we have in
real life stories which sound almost
as fantastic-stories of the man
who moved in a world which was
always what he chose to make it,
of the man whose actions were
only those which Lady Whim
called upon him to perpetrate.
It is interesting to find Lewis
mentioning the fact that Rabelais'
Panurge is drawn on lines which
closely parallel the historical
facts of Villon's life and deeds. In
physical resemblance, also, the
pictures are much the same. This
kind of suggestion, without proof,
and in fact needing none, suggests
the kinship which links all of these
spirits of fun together in the com-
mon urge of levity.
Lewis's book should appeal to
anyone who is interested in
characters of the world. And es-
pecially to those who are intrigued
by the study of the spirit of a man,
who, more than any others, per-
fectly exemplifies the heart of fif-
teenth century Paris. There is in
it the spirit of Villon, translated
into type as only a student and a
lover could translate it. With this
spirit there goes also a fund of re-
rearch and factual investigation
which enriches the book and adds
much to the little that is known
of the real Villon. The notes are
especially valuable in this respect.
This is a book which adequately
represents the best of the new bi-
ographies and literary studies. It
is authoritative and learned, while,
at the same time, it catches the
spirit and the life of the man. It
is the model of what a literary
study should be.
*E. B. Wyndham Lewis. Selected
by the Literary Guild. Published
by Coward-McCann Publishing
Company. $5.00.
* * *
IN SEARCH OF A RELIGION
AMONG THE LADIES
"Oliver Honey, with six months
to live," (we steal this from the
jacket) "did what so few of us
would have the courage to do. He
settled his estate by giving it to his
brothers, broke with the girl to
whom he was engaged, and set out
on his travels to spend the last

months of his life in pursuing the
things he had always wanted to
know and to understand."
But that is the least part of this
book. This is mere framework.
What is important is Honey's con-
ception. This book, "Brief Candle,"
is the study of Honey's religion-
a religion which finds itself di-
vorced from the church and sep-
arated from all known creeds.
This man is seeking a personal re-
ligion-a religion which represents,
in its idealism, the highest civiliza-
tion of individuals, and the growth
and expression of each man's
code according to a purely indi-
vidualistic conception.
The central part of Honey's re-
ligion is in his turning away from
the animal and the sensual which
all men are prone to embrace. In
this connection it was strange that
he encounters in this book three
women who offer to "love him andt
give him all" and that he spurns
all three of them. Mrs. Brook's
comfortable emotionalism, Lydia's.
intellectual prostitution, Rose
Pacey's animal meekness and utter

)KS
alone it is readable for its mild
sarcasm and often for its cutting
morbidness.
*By Norman Venner. Bobbs-
Merrill and Co. $2:50.
* * *
AT A MODERATE PRICE, IN A
MODEST FORM, FOR THE
MODERN READER
The Modern Library has been
weeding the rows in its library.
Some of. the earlier books have!
been drugs on the market and they
have failed to find the place inten-
ded for them by the editors. In the
places of these books, some classics
have been placed-and if all weed-
ing has such excellent results, we
say that every publisher should
weed his lists immediately.
The two new additions, Rabe-
lais "Gragantua and Pantagruel"
and Anatole France's "The Revolt
of the Angels," are notable selec-
tions. The first is an enchanting
tale which falls into the place'
mentioned in the review of Villon
above. Adventure abounds. Pan-
urge indulges his fancy, whether it
is with the itching powder which
causes panic among the finely
dressed ladies in the street, or
with his trained fleas which write
their verses on the white necks
of virgins. Fancy and whim-
these are the dictates of life.
In "TheRevolt of the Angels"
we have France at his best. The!
tale of Maurice d'Esparvieu and
his guardian angel, of the revolt
of the Angels, and of their sub-
sequent meeting in Hell-all are
told in inimitable style, by the
master of this kind of writing. Thef
play of the master mind with ideas,
with fancy, and with satire of the
bitterest kind is evident to the
reader who reads with his mind,,
and not with his eyes alone.
The selections of the Modern
Library reflect each month the
acumen and the vision of the edi-
tors. This collection is now one
of the most comprehensive and
best selections of good literature at
a moderate price to be found any-
where in the world.
CAPITALIZING POPULARITY
"Good-bye Wisconsin,"* Glenway
Wescott's recent production, falls
into the catagory of a disappoint-
ing follow-up of "The Grand-
mothers." There is a very notic-___
able diminuation in the power of
this book. Its panoramma of life
is more limited, it is lacking in the
wealth of mterial which the earl-
ier book contained, and the per-
ception of society and people is
shallower. As if to compensate for
this, the book is, at least, beauti-
fully written, and has some pas-
sages of splendid description.
The plan of a series of stories
more or less connected is again
followed in this book. But now
there is no under-woven thread,
linking the stories together. In-
stead of a keen insight into people,
as in "The Grandmothers," there
is satire, sketches, and half-
visioned possibilities that the
author has attempted to utilize too
soon.
There are portions of the book
which are, however, well worth

reading. The opening sketch is
one of these. It is filled with keen,
delightful satire on modern society.
There are many passages such as
this bit on fraternity men:
"Republican principles, false-look-
ing gestures of affection, more
than one hand laid deliberately on
the next shoulder, expert joking
evidently meant to create an at-
mosphere of intimacy; these habits
will be useful in later life if they
are to be, for example, traveling
salesmen or ward politicians."
Such cleverness may make very
amusing reading, and in this case
it does, but it is too shallow to be
classed as literature.
"The Whistling Swan," and "Ad-
olescence," are the only sketches
which approach the standard Wes-
cott has set himself in his earlier
work. The first of these is a
musician's life. The second is a
,study o f a boy's awakening to t he
relations of the sexes, and the ef-'
feet an intense imagination has
upon what he thinks and feels..
This is undoubtably the finest
selection in the book.
The other stories do not, how-
ever, come up to those which have
been mentioned. One has a feel-
ing that Wescott has had glimpses
of the lives of people, and hastily

Io cet
- - - - - - - - - - -

. I

A LIMITED NUMBER OF TICKETS FOR
INDIVIDUAL CONCERTS WILL PROB-
ABLY REMAIN FOR SALE BEGINNING

Monday, October 8

--8:3A.M.

$1.50

$2.00

$3.00

AT THE

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC

- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -------- 0, """A - ,,, - ko hAWOo%0%0%0%0%0,

Oct. 10

ROSA PONSELLE, Re-
nowned Operatic Dramatic So-

Jan. 18
Jan. 24,

prano.

ROLAND
Tenor.
PRAGUE
CHORUS,
Conductor

HAYES,

Negro

TEAC.
Metod

HERS
Dolezil,

Oct. 22

Amelita GALLI-CURCI, Dis-
tinguished Coloratura Soprano

5)
.

Feb. 13'

Nov. 12

VLADMIR

HOROWITZ,

Soloist with the Detroit Orches-

Feb. 20

tra.

S E R G E I RACHMANI-
NOFF, Pianist
YELLY D'ARANYI, Violin-
ist
DETROIT SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA, ALFRED
HERTZ, Conductor of the San
Francisco Orchestra,Guest Can-
ductor.

Nov. 23 FLONZALEY

STRING

Mar. 11

QUARTET, Farewell Season

Dec. 13

FRITZ KREISLER,
King

Violin

A FEW SEASON TICKETS STILL ON SALE

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THAT SEEMS TO TELL all about'
Yost and why Michigan hired him.
It seems that Wesleyan has finally
done better than the Yost team
and has defeated a Michigan team.
We hesitate to continue the reason-
ing.
* * *W
WE FEEL THAT WE have lost

love-all these three fill him with
disgust. But he is not without
misgivings; he is assailed many
times with the futility of his ven-
ture, and many times almost

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