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February 21, 1929 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-02-21

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

T U aI AY FEBRUARY it,'-1020

PAGE FOUR '1'HURSDAY F~flIVCXARY ~

.... .
.

rublished every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial'
Association.
the Associated Press is exclusively en
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, s second class matter. Special rate
of postag, granted by. Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$ Ofices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editoral, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor .................Nelson J. Smith
City Editor..... . . Stewart Hooker
News Editor............ Richard C. Kurvink
Spirts Editor..............W. Morris Quinn
Women's Editor... .........Sylvia S. Stone
Telegraph Editor.........George Stauter
Music and Drama......... ...R. L. Askren
Assistant City Editor..........Robert Silbar
Night Editors
Yoseph E. Howell Charles S. Monroe
onald J. Kline Pierce Rosenberg
Lawrence R. Klein George 9. Simons
George C. Tilley

THE BATTLE GOES ON
Prohibition was onec more
brought to the fore on Monday
when the two oratorical giants of
the United States Senate, James A.
Reed, of Missouri, and William E.
Borah, Idaho, clashed over every
phase of the eighteenth amend-j

ED
I jT ROLL
THERE'S GQLD
PILLS
IN TII ,M

Music And Drama I
TONIGHT: Comedy Club presents
"Take My Advice" by Elliott Les-
ter, in Mimes Theatre, beginning
at 8:15 o'clock.

F4 QUALITY.$
c. 0 oer
4, 2I-

'
. 4 <
.
,.
{
+ ;

Paul L. Adams
Morris Alexande
C.' A. Askren
Bertram Askwi.x
.Louise Behyme
Arthur Bernste u
Seton C. Bovee
Isabel Charles
L. R. Chubb
Frank 1'. Coopcr
I elen Domine
Margaret Eckels
Douglas Edwards
Valborg Egeland
Robert J. Feldman
Marjorie Follmier
William Gentry
Ruth Geddes
David B. Hempstea
Richard Jung
Charles R. Kaufma
Ruth Kelsey

Reporters
Donald E. Layman
Charles A. Lewis
Marian McDonald
Henry Merry
Elizabeth Quaife
Victor Rab inowitz
Joseph A. Russell
Anne Schell
Rachel Shearer
Howard Simon
Robert L. Sloss
Ruth Steadman
A. Stewart
Cadwell Swanson
L Jane Thayer
Edith Thomas
Beth Valentine
Gurney Williams
ad Jr.. Wrter Wilds
George E. Wohlgemi'th
an Edward L. Warner Jr.
Cleland Wyllie

ment before galleries crowded to ( Exactly 450,000 Old Golds have
capacity with the forces of the W. been dragged around the campus
C. T. U., and the anti-Saloon'in the past two Weeks. Three lec-
league. ture series have been discontinued
Reed left nothing untouched Ibecause the speakers fear the ter-
when he tore through everything rific epidemic of coughing that is
methods of prohibition, and the expected to afflict the student body
from the principles of the law to at any moment.
peculiar thing about it all was that ** *
'almost all of his statements, espe- "Well," said Oscar, Polls Wonder
cially his charges relative to en- Horse, in an interview late last
forcement methods, were true. He night, "some one slipped me the
then referred to methods used in blindfold test. He put Old Golds
securing the ratification of the into my bin instead of hay and I
amendment by reading. the public didn't notice the difference until I
confession of William "Pussyfoot" started coughing."
Johnson in which that reformer
admitted that he lied, bribed, and THE ROLLS EXECUTIVE BOARD,
cheated in order to put prohibition IN RAN EFFORT TO FIND OUT
over. tWHY OLD GOLDS TIRE THE
That method of making amend- TASTE, TORE ONE APART YES-
ments to our constitution cannot TERDAY AND PROVED BEYOND
lead; to a successful legal code, nor SHADOW OF DOUBT THAT THEY
can a system of laws passed under
such conditions command the re-U AREN'T GOOD FOR YOUR INNER
spect of the American people. TUBES.
About the only defense offered w
were some rather derogatory re-
marks as to Mg Reed's personal
character, delivered by Sen. Thad-
deus H. Caraway, of Arkansas, and
4 question as to whether the in-
dividual states could do better in *
regulating liquor traffic than the In order to halt a possible fraud
federal government, put by Sen. among the student body, Rolls has
Borah. The latter offered no con- endeavored to obtain a specimen
crete suggestions as to methods of of the type of cigarette distributed
effectively enforcing the prohibi- around the campus. We examined
tion amendment, but simply asked the contents and found silver
that all public officials, as part of threads among the gold.
their duty, see that it was properly * * *
enforced. He made the statement And of course, boys and girls
that neither he nor his colleagues you heard about the Scotchman on
would live to see the day when that the campus who registered thre
part of the constitution was re- times this semester that he woul
pealed.. have free smokes all year.
If enforcement is to be made ef- * *, *
fective it will be almost necessary Now that the Old Gold company
from a moral standpoint to repeal his originated the idea of passing
either that or the bill of rights., free samples of their product abou
Beside inflicting a financial injus- the university campuses, some cig
tice upon the people of the state, hette factory should try it,
that, together with other reform
bills is taking away the personal A
liberty for which our country was MANOFCTIE OF "THE TRNAS
supposedly founded. By taking URE OF THEM ALL" iS PICTUREI
away the revenue from liquor taxes BELOF ANDM EXLL ISC H
and spending huge sums for farcial BELOW, AND EXPLAINS Wi
enforcement attempts, that law is OLD GOLDS CAN BE IDENTIFIED
working a second injustice on the IN THE BLINDFOLD TESTS.
people of the United States.
Campus Opinion

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
AdvrtiingDepartment Managers
dertising.............Alex K. Scherer
Advertising...........A. JamesJordan
Advertising............... Carl W. Hammer
Service...................Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation................. George S. Bradley
Accounts ............... Lawrence EB. Walkley
Publications................Ray M. Hofelich

* 1 *
YELLY D'ARANY
A Review by Herbert S. Schwartz
Chiefly to be remembered of Miss
D'Aranyi's concert is the abomin-
able accompaniment that distorted
everything it accompanied; a brief
!surcease was afforded by the Bach'
Andante and Gavotte foi the violin
alone. It seems strange and un-
reasonable that an artist of Miss
D'Aranyi's caliber should be so
careless of so important a matter.
I Literally and musically there was
absolute lack of blending. The
pianist for the most part seemed
to be quite unaware that a violinist
who was, or should be, the master
of the situation, was playing. Mere
subduing of tone is hardly adequate
recognition of the fact. The re-
viewer cannot recall a single in-
stance where the attack was syn-
chronized. In the more intricate
passages the accompanist seemed ,
to be out of breath in her mad en-
deavor to hold the pace; when she
could more easily cope with the
situation,. she was utterly absorbed
with her own none too musical self-
expression. Violinists are notori-
ously careless of their accompanists
but they all, seem able to choose
one who can keep together with
s them. It may be excusable for a
violinist to play with someone
whose musical intelligence out-
shines his own; the compdrison
r might be unprofitable; but any
comparisons suggested by last
night's performance were only
odious.
Apart from this self-imposed
e handicap Miss D'Aranyi showed
d herself to be a very acceptable
violinist. She played with very
pleasing tone (if not a luscious
y one); the quality of her G-string
g was quite accurate, her phrasing
t generally in good taste, her shading
- sensitive; there was more than
ample technique. More than this
cannot be said. One did not feel
E any overwhening intensity o the
reserved discrimination and bal-
I ance to which such intensity somv
i times matures. There was a little
d of everything; enough to make an
exceptionally good violinist-but I
nothing more. Miss D'Aranyi should I
make a marvelously good player of
chamber music (if she chooses
more capable assistance than she
did for this performance).
The program was too shot and
the key too monotonous. There was
too much centered about D major
and nearly related keys. The Vitali
Ciaconna was very successful.
t While it could not be said that
there was any great breadth in this
performance, any remarkable feel-
_ ing for larger outlines, the smaller
n parts were done with such appar-
m ent delicacy and taste that one
readily excused this deficiency. The
same might be said for the Bach
f Andante and Gavette. To the third
group, consisting of short violinistic
r pieces was done well enough; the
r music was charming in an inconse-
quential fashion.

'®U

Johnson's Electric Waxer
$29.75
(or for rent by the day)

Old English or
Johnson's Wax
65c per lb.

4' QUJALITY.
4,

Jno. C. Fischer Co.

Q6
.
t
G

Kitchen Furnishigs of All Kinds
Such as Gas Ranges, Enameled and Aluminum Ware,
Dinner and Glassware, Electric Goods of
All Kinds, Paints, Varnishes,
and Polishes.

'1
.- ;
r-- I

V'~

UALT.
,~Q °
/QUALITY.
'j;1jQ Q

'I

(1

fN
1, r
54 t
A.,

Mary Chase
J eanette Dale
ernor Davis .
Bessie. Egeland
Sally Faster
Anna Goldberg
Kasper Halverson
George Hamilton
Jack Harwich
Dix Humphrey

Assistants
Marion Kerr
Lillian Kovinsky
Bernard Larson
Hollister Mabley
L .A. Newman
Jack Rose.
Carl F. Schemm
George Spater
Sherwood Upton
Marie Wellstead

Night Editor-GEORGE E. SIMONS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1929
THE COMING RENAISSANCE
For some time the world of edu-
cation, particularly higher educa-
tion, has been looking for some
sucker to fire the opening salvo in
a campaign to reserve college
training for the fittest. President
Little tried it last year and got for
his pains the damnation of faint
praise and the dubious honors of
martydom. A heavy precipitation
of conservatism dampened the fuse
on his University college project.
The cause has recently found an-
other young champion attacking
albeit from a lowlier point of van-
tage, but undeniably attacking. The
new champion is Headmaster Wen-
dell of The Hill, progressive ad-
ministrator of a leading prepara-
tory school, who has dared to tell
parsents that their sons would do
better in other fields of endeavor
than college. He says to parents,
in substance, "We can probably
train your son to pass college board
examinations, but we know that
his chances of staying in college are
slim. We will liberalize his courses,
but we advise against his going to
college."
For this heresy Headmaster Wen-
dell, unlike Heretic Little, has re-
ceived no damnation, some praise.
One more than likely reason for
his survival is that he broached
his radicalism in the East where
thought is less smug. Then, too,
he was only giving official articu-
lation to rumbles that have long
been heard in other preparatory
schools such as Hotchkiss, Taft, St.
Paul's, and Choate.
The idea that only a part of
those who can enter should go to
college is unquestionably due to
spread. It is one of those funda-
mental and apparent truths, long
unpropagated, that will be accept-
ed during the educational renais-
sance soon to follow the present
dark age. Its acceptance will be
manifested in harder entrance ex-
aminations, smaller enrollments,
fewer half-baked graduates, and
University colleges gently weeding
out the palpably unfit before they
have squandered four years trying
to assume a cultural veneer.
Eventually the principle that
higher education should be re-
served for the fittest will be applied
in practice as commonly and natu-
v~nlltr no "-......gni 1..1i4nrl }y

YOU'LL find that Kellogg's Pep
Bran Flakes are better bran flakes.
There's nothing like that peppy
flavor of PEP or that unusual
crispness.
Try these better bran flakes.
You get the nourishment from the
wheat. Just enough bran to be
mildly laxative. Order some today
at your campus cafeteria or the
fraternity restaurant. Made by
Kellogg of Battle Creek.
PEP BRAN FLAKES

.j
t)
l
.
r
s
.
l
1
r
I
i
.
s
l
i
a

j ontributors are asked to be brief,j
confining themselves to less than 300 j
words i possible. Anonymous coin-
!I munications will be disregarded. The
names of conmnunicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
que.st. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
"STEP OUT OF SUNLIGHT"
To the Editor:
That most recalcitrant and impi-
T ous of man, Diogenes, who would'
find unimpeachable honesty and
truth, was once confronted by
Alexander the Great at Corinth.
Asked by the youthful Uebermensch
if he could oblige him in any way,
the Cynic answered, "Yes, kindly
step out of the sunlight."
I humbly compare myself to Di-
cgenes in certain searchings I
wculd make and questions I would
ask. I hope that because of my
taste for truth, I may not seem
recalcitrant' impious or idiosyn-
cratic. For I am only following the
custom established by this delight-
ful shocking, Cynic of earring the
lamp into far corners. Besides,.
what others say of such a proced-
ure does not matter much, as it
has never mattered.
The subject of my questionings is
near to the studenxt.< hearts. In
all recent discus ion upon it, this
faat was fcrgctten, and President
Little's resignation or removal was
deemed a state concern, a Board
of Regents' concern, an Ann Arbor
Landladies' concern. Basically (or
ideally) it is the student's concern.
He is the one who is being educated
and trained; he should have some
few words to say about the dis-
missal or appointment of his intel-
lectual Mentor, to whom he has
intrusted not merely a house and
the teaching of a Telemachus, but
the sanctity of an intellectual out-
look and an intellectual develop-
ment. For it is vital to me to'
know whether I shall be guided by
the hand of a Little, a GlennI
Frank, or a Meikeljohn; or by thef
hand of the political boss' friend
whose only recommendation to so
do is his wish for a sinecure; or by
the hand of an ex-president of the
illustrious United States who brings
with him an extraordinary ability
to read typewritten speeches and

"All is not gold that glitters,
rasped the cynical senior as he li
a Chesterfield.
This idea of the Old Gold com.
pany is really a humanitarian
move. It keeps the boys fron
smoking cigarettes.
* * *
"Old Gold--The Treasure o
Them All." Well, ' they taste a
though they had been buried fo
a long time.
+ * *
THIS EXCLUSIVE PHOTO O
TOASTY-ROLLS' MASCOT-WA
SNAPPED IMMEDIATELY AFTEI
THE OBSERVANT PUP HAI
PASSED A FRATERNITY HOUSI
WHERE 25 TINS OF OLD GOLD
HAD JUST BEEN DELIVERED.
If all the Old Golds delivered t
students on the campus wer
placed in a pile, they would with
out doubt fill that great big Uni
versity incinerator plant. An
that, doubtless, would be by fa
the best way to smoke them.
* * *

The most popular cereals served
in the dining-rooms of American
colleges, eating clubs and fra-
ternities are made by Kellogg
In Battle Creak. They include
Pep Bran Flakes, ALL-BRAN, Rice
Krispies, Krumbles, Corn Flakes
and Kellogg's Shredded Whole
Wheat Biscuit.-Also
Kaffec Hag Coffee
-the coffee that
Icts you sleep.
PER P
BRAN FLAKES
WHEAT
KLGMCOMPANy
w'oe I ,

11

'That 47th

Ls,
S
R
D
E
S
t0
e
1-
1-
d
r

t'4AKE MY ADVICE"
A Review by Paul L. Adams
"Good Heavens! Another com-
plication!" When Joseph Weaver
made this remark in the third act
of "Take My Advice," he did it
with a sincerity which might well
be a criticism of Comedy Club's
latest effort, for the play is just
that-a series of farcial complica-
tions which makes good entertain-
ment if, nothing more, because of
the cleverness of the lines.
Most notable among the cast was
Alfred ;Foster' who was assigned
the rather difficult part of play-
ing a seventeen year old boy in
love, and did it with success. The
nature of the play caused most of
the parts to degenerate into bur-
lesque, and this was true of Mr.
' Foster as Bud Weaver, but he did
it with a consistency and a certain
( measure of seriousness which com-
bined to make his work the most
outstanding of the evening.
Jeanette Dale as Mrs. Weaver also
did more with her part than one
might have hoped from a readin!
of the play. As the wife of a long
suffering husband, she was realisti-
cally irrdtional, charming, ava yet
capable of arousMg our symipathit's
for Mr. Weaver.
Charles Pea ke, i)) the importaifl.
role of Professor 'leeinnt, who acts
as a sort of combination of Sher-
lock Holmes and master of cere-
monies, was rather of a disappoint-
went. His lack of adequate facial
and voice. expression, seer in occe).-
.4.. 1vyn -s~ ~riu i i ...,.i

f

Iprovement
... Pressureless Touch
Geo. S. Parker's
latest, in the Modern
2'igreaterDuofold-aids college I
ink capdcity, work immensely
size for size,
than aver-
aer- bfS.IThink of this: A pen that's 28%
age pen.lighter than rubberyet this light
'EN'weight alone is all that is re-
quired to start it writing at the
fix st touch of the point to paper.
And keep it writing 'smoothly,
evenly and beautifully at any
speed!
Finger-pressure is relieved!
if No bearing down! No effort!
1I Merely guidance fromyour hand
-the pen itselfdoes all the writ-
I ing for youa
And none of the interruptions
orintrusions that any other kind
of pen has ever caused before
a gliding, smooth response that
clears the track for THINK-
ING, thus producing BETTER,
thoughts for class-room or home
work.
So smooth and cven that all
I '~jpapers take iuk botter fro it.
,11This is aeo. S. Parker's 47th
Improvemnient in a founoain pcn,
known as Parker Pressurcle5s
Touch.
1 11 ' n ?IvI ..~u"

FRANK: DID YOU GET- YOUR
TIN OF OLD GOLDS?
EARNEST: NO; I WAS OUT
WHEN. THEY ARRIVED AND-
FRANK: I KNOW; I'M A FRA-
TERNITY MAN TOO.
~ * *

The result is the most able pen
you've ever used-a. pen we
*guarantee forever against all
defects so its benefits to you are
everlasting.
T.pry it without obligation at
any nearby pen counter today.
All dealers are glad to have you
demonstrate it to yourself.
Other Parker Duofold features
are Barrels of Parker Permanite,
Non-Breakable, Ink-Tight
Duo-Sleeve Cap, Non-Leakable,
Choice of Five Flashing Colors
and New, Modern, Black and
Pearl, the Latest Mode.
Every genuine ParkerDuofold
Pen or Pencil is stamped, "Geo.
S. Parker---'DUOFOLD," onthe
barrel. That is there for your
protection. See it when you buy
Tae rAI'kJrLN ComrANY. JANIySVILLE.WIS.
UI'C 15 ANDSBSIDIARIE S:
NrIV YOK * CHICAGD " ATLANTA
T+1i:VUA1 ) * PALL AS *SAN FRANCISCU
TONUN1. S A r;AAA'LON4DON. NGLA1I1L
Un

Well, what would YOU
a case of Old Golds?

do with

GUMILEY and LARK

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