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February 21, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH-MEMICHI G"AN

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DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1929

- . _

ORSAMUS M PEARL, '29
WINS TIMES CONTEST
01 CURRENT MATTERS

Committee Battles PRESIDENT LI T TLE PRAISES S TUDENTS; STILL SEEKS"
Cn (ar T4 l. TO AID UNIV ERSITY, HE SAYS IN NEW YORK ADDRESS

Proposed Reductioir of Tkx Brings
Debate Of Church Sup#orters
And Bell Makers
Pitched battles, pleas for lifting

"If there -I
the Univers
may rest as.
try to do
Clarence Cc
dinner of tb
gan society
Hotel Comn

PHI BETA KAPPA MEMBER
BESTl OF LOCAL
PARTICIPANTS

IS of the tariffs, and accusations of
yesterday's session of the ways and
meansco mmittee of the lower

anything I can do for recriminations and hatreds which tfamily fights," which were prompt-
S would not only injure and hurt ly forgotten. That was particular-
sity of Michigan, you persons but would also injure the ly true of the University college,
sured that I will always quality'off' education. which after going through, received
it," declared President "I don't know what I'm going to the full support of the schools op-
ook Little at a recent do. if I should get into cancer posing it.
he'Un:versity of Michi- reseach. work, that might be a "I want to speak also of the
happy solution. I seem to have splendid way in wlhich the student
of New York, at the been poison to anything with which body stood by," he continued. "You
nodore. I have :come in contact, and ifI I can't expect a lot of youths to
i to protect the quality did the same thing to cancer, it cheer themselves hoarse when cer-
on at the University," would be a benefit to the human! tain privileges they have always
continued "If I'm in race." enjoyed are taken away from
's my job to get out of In the beginning, Dr. Little said them; that's not human nature.
4o one can accuse me of that repdrts of serious disagree- But some of the leaders of the
ng a good fight." But ment wih' his faculty were without protest against the prohibitions of
ative to his staying, he foun'datfon. There have been dis- automobiles were the first to offer
a- wide' open split, with agreements, but they were "mere help in solving other problems."
- {

Dean Cabot To Lead
Discussion On Faith
Dr. Hugh Cabot, dean of the
Medical School, will lead the dis-
cussion on "The Basis of Faith"* at
the second of a series of twelve stu-
dent forums under the general
heading of "Looking on Life" spon-
sored by the Student Christian as-
sociation, to be held at 4:05 o'clock
this afternoon, in the reading room
of Lane hall These informal week-
ly meetings are open to all students.

TICKETSA

NOVELTY FEATURE PLANNED'
As a novelty feature, the Un,;-
versity Lecture series presents"Mr.
Cuthbert Kelly in a musical pro-
gram, assisted by Miss .Nellie Car'-
son, at 4:15 o'clock Monday after-
noon, February 25, in the Natural
Science auditorium

RRESERVATIONS
For All Important
Lake and Ocean Linca
Tours, Cruises
Independent Travel
E. G. Kuebler
Gen, Steamship Ageney
601 E. Hluron Ph. 6412
ANN ARBOR

I'

RECEIVES $15O AWARlk

Will ' Compete For University
Nat'ional Competition of
Colleges

In

Orsamus M. Pearl, '29, is the win-
ner of the local division of New
York Times Current Events con-
test, held here last Friday, it is
bing announced today by the com-
mittee' of the University faculty
which arranged the local contest.
The winner was selected from 28
participants and is now eligible for
a $150 cash prize, and for compe-
tition in the national contest, in
which 20 colleges and universities
are eteried.
Second place in the contest was
awarded to Victor Rabinowitz, '31,
who is' also winner of the under-
class competition. He will receive
a $75 cash prize. Allan R. Moore,
'29Ed., winner of third honors,, will
receive a $25 cash award.
"Pearl's paper is the best written
that has been submitted at any
current events contest held at the
University. Michigan will have a
worthy representative' in the na-
tional contest," Prof. Everrett S-
Brown, of .the political science de-
partment and chairman of the
committee which sponsored the
contest locally, stated when he an-
nounced the winner.
Interest Is Increasing
"Interest in the Current Events'
contest is decidedly on the in-
crease" Prof. Brown stated. "There
were 28 participants this year as
compared with 17 last year. There
was also a superior quality of work
exhibited. An equality of entrants
btweCn the upper and lower clas-
ses of the University makes the
future outlook on such contests ever
more' promising."
Pearl, who comes from St. Johns,
is an .outstanding scholar on the
campus. He was elected to Phi
Beta Kappa, last year (his junior
year). During the past three years
at the University his record has
contained, outside of "A" grades,
only four "B's". Predominating in
the course of study followed by the
winner at the University, are clas.
sical subjects; 'the study of Latin
and Greek, and allied subjects.
Judges of the event wish to com-
mend the' efforts of the contestant
who registered under the number
822; but who failed to include his
name or class in' the identification
envelope. His work ranked among
the first few, and if he is an under-
classman should enter the contest
next year, according to Prof.
Brown.
Members of the committee in ad-
dition to Prof. Brown, were Prof.
P. W. Slosson, of the history de-
partment, Prof. John L. Brumm, of
the journalism department, Prof
Z. C. Dickenson, of the economics
department, and Prof. Waldo Ab-
bot, of the rhetoric department.
Competition in the contest con-
sisted of identifying 25 prominent'
persons, answering 15 factual ques-
. tions of a brief nature, and 10 of a
more general nature, and writing'
~essay's of from 250 to 500 words on
five subjects selected from 15 topics
that have taken a significant as-
pect during the last nine months.
Pearl's paper will now be entered
into national competition, which'
includes 19 other universities. Most
of these institutions are located in
the east, Chicago being' the only
one west of Michigan.
Students At Indiana
Oppose Fund Drives
Students interviewed by the In-
diana Daily Student, expressed
themselves in favor of the aboli-
tion of fund drives for campus
groups. Several said that the bur-
,den of such drives falls on the or-
ganized students, often being added
to their house bill, while the unor-
ganized students have little to pay.

house which is now considerings "of edubaIs
of educatio7
annual tariff schedule. Most'of the Dr. Littlec
arguments occured during the dis- the' way, it'
cussion of the 40 percent ad valo- the way. N
rem tariff on carillons which is be- not enjoyin
ing attacked at present. the alterna
Representatives of six college' said, was a
and church institutions who at-
tended the hearings asked that
carillons be put on the free list in
order to encourage musical and
cultural advancement in commun-
ities where religious and educa-
tional bodies exist. Howard Flem-
ing, an officer of Grace church,
Plainfield, N. J., in speakinglor the
removal of the tariff on cariliorns
made the point' tlat although some
bells and chimes are cast in the
United States, all carillons had tQ
be imported and that this neces-
sarily would affect many churches
and schools throughout the' coun-
try.
S. W. Seery, of the VcShane Bell
Foundry company of Baltimore,
immediately retorted by saying that
American manufacturers could
make carillons just as well as their'
foreign competitors if they were
given a chance. He then added
that all those representatives who
were asking for tax exemption on
the'bells Were merely "an organized
band of mighty poor Americans
who were interested in creating' a*
carillon monopoly abroad."
Results of this hearing' by the'
wvays and means committee of the
house are awaited with interest
and anxiety by alumni of the Uni-
versity of Michigan who are spon-
soring the carillon campaign for
the bells to be installed in the
proposed Burton Memorial Cam-
panile.
If, on the recommendation of the
ways and means committee, Con-
gress should remove the duty'on:
carillons it -will affect markedly
the University carillon project. It
will result in one of two things ac-
cording to T. Hawley Tapping, field,
secretary of the Alumni associa-
tion. Either the originally planned
carillon of 48 bells will be purchas-
ed or else the same amount of
money will be expended for a caril-
lon which would be the finest in
the world; surpassing even the'
newly erected carillon in the' Bird
Sancturay in Florida, which was
recently dedicated by President
Coolidge.
Among the institutions inter-
ested in the hearings, besides the
University of Michigan, are' the
Park Avenue Baptist church of
New York and the University of
Chicago.
- ---- - ------- - - --- -
Dawn111 1 onuts
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You will get a good
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WITH WH OLE MILK OR

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t

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Faith in the economic future still points
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-Out of the belief that-the. puhie,'needs
a broader use of the telephone is grow-
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telephone service. Like the railroads of
an earlier day, this service is now tapping
and helping to, develop rich new terri-
tories of commerce.

CR EAM

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ALL THIS WEEK
AT THE

,r
;;

BELL SYSTEM
a aio-id yte f ne$44) et g eepot

at Breka
Outr Bismarcks and Raised'
Donuits at all tie' Stores
and Restaurants.

TH EATER.
A LOT OF LAUGHS
AND A TEAR BESIDES!

I
A
Ct
I

OUR

PI ON E E RI N-G

W O R K

H AS J U ST

BEGTUN'

'! Ij

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a :,..-
^T
~_, .
. I

&miling Irish c a /hing Irish Ileris
BEL NNlT-NEIL HAMILTON-VICTOR GID,
TED WNAMARA - EDhELCAYTON -CONSTANCE HOWARD'*
£Sayr PJA JOHNSON YOUNGe Scznariu b GxCE+I~flD ORA,
JOHN FORD Produaton

:

Traditional law at Greeley, Colo.,
is trying for the college students at
times. No dates are allowed dur-
ing the basketball season, for it is
thought. that they will hinder the
men from "getting together" and'
being most effective in supporting
the team.
Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
LAST WEEK
Evenings-1.00 to $3.00;
Sat. Matinee-$1.00 to $2.50
Schwab & Mandel present
"GOOD NEWS" Ii

SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION

'I
it'
I
I

IM1

I

" I1.. .1. £ £L.A-dYlrl. £1 ~wf,

111.. _: . j. '.. 1

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