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May 26, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-26

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SUNDAY, MAY 26, 1929

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VAUE THREE~Ni

Thirty-Sixth Summer

Session Promises Attractive Features

S331 HAS RAPIO
REEANSION
Lectures, Spacial Courses And Trips
Fill Program Announced
Eor Summer Study
AUO BAN. INTERPRETED

0

"Where No One Doth The Sinner Ply. ..

FIELD COURSES IN
SCIENCES PLANNED

Bulwark Of Literary College

Embodying numerous attractive I
innovations, of both an academic
.and an extra-curricular nature,--
the thirty-sixth annual Summer
Session of the University will ' be
conducted from June 24 to August
16 in ?.ll colleges and departments
eUcept the Law school, the session
of Vnich will begin a week earlier I
awl end a week later.,
Summer instruction was firstr
~given at the University in 1894
when a group of 91 students en-
rolled. The instruction was natur-;
ally at first limited in scope and
confined to the Literary college.
The number of courses gradually-
increased, and now instruction isy
offered in practically all depart- >4
rnents of the University. The at-
tend-hnce has grown to more than,
4000 and students are drawn from
all 'parts of the United States and
from about 20 foreign countries.
Chief among the new features of
the Sessioi are the physics sym-
posium' by eminent men in th-at
field, a group of non-credit courses
to be given by the School of Edu-
cation, and also a play production'
series by the Michigan Summer THE BOULEVARD
Repertory Theater, each of which Toward which students when is rumored that above many of the
Is treated separately elsewhere on distraught by their academic la- walks the foliage is so full that
this page. bors, turn for a rendezvous in the
The entire athletic facilities of long summer evenings, obstacles to only an occasional glimpse of the
the University, including for the the contrary notwithstanding. It moon may be had.
first time the new Intramural! - - -___--_---____-- v-
building, will be open for the use SCHOOL OF EDUCATION TO OFFER
of students of the Session.
For the benefit of those who an- EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS COURSES

Activities In Biology, Geography
and Geology Will CentersAround
Outside Localities
CAMPS ADAPTED TO WORK
Field courses this summer will
center chiefly around the biolog-
ical station at Douglas Lake and
the field work in geology and geog-
raphy which will be conducted in
Kentucky, with the contributions of
the surveying atcivities in Wyoming
and the Michigan field work in
geography which Professor McMur-'1
ray will conduct.
The twenty-first biological station
will open June 24 and. continue 1
throughout the eights weeks of the1
regular session. The station is situ-
ated on the shores of Douglas Lake
in the northern part of the lower
penisula. In the transition zone,
between the region of evergreen
coniferous forest to the north and
that of deciduous hardwood for-
est to the south, providing unusual
opportunity for the study of vebe-
ation-types characeristic of both
regions.'

JAMES B. ANGELL HALL
The scene of intensive activity anticipates a record enrollment in
for many students and teachers all departments of the University,
who are carrying on the work of and has arranged for new features
the Summer Session. Dean Edward for this year' designed to accom-
H. Kraus of the Summer Session modate the students.
PROMINENT PHYSICISTS TO CONDUCT
LECTURES AND DISCUSSION GROUPS'

OFFERCURRICULA
IN DHAMATIC ARIS
Prof. Chester Marvin Wallace Will
Direct All Activities In Both
Courses and Theater
PLAY CAST IS ANNOUNCED
Theater arts activities during the
summer, chanced by the use of the
new Lydia Mendelssohn theaterin
the Women's League. will be con-
ducted by the Michigan Summer
Repertory Theater under the direc-
tion of the Department of Speech.
A summer stock company, pre-
senting a repertory of professional
calibre, will produce a number of
prominent plays for the entertain-
ment of the summer session stu-
dents in the dramatics arts course
of beginner's ability.
All of the summer's activities,
I both in courses, and in the thea-
ter, will be under the direction of
Prof. Chester Marvin Wallace, head
of the drama school at the Car-
negie Institute of Technology. Pro-
fessor Wallace is a graduate o4
Western Reserve University and of
the American Academy of Dramatic
Arts. During his ten years of pro-
fessional experience. he has been
an actor in Shakespearean reper-
tory, an actor and director of his
own company, and a member of the
Copely Theater Repertory company.
Valentine B. Windt. who has been
in charge of Play Production ac-
tivities during the regular session
this winter, will assist Professor
Wallace.
The Lydia Mendelssohn theater
is the newest .and most attractive
playhouse on the campus. The
auditorium seats 700. The stage is
24 feet deep by 60 feet wide; the
prescenium arch. 30 feet wide and
18 feet high. The eauipment of the
stage is complete and modern in
all respects, including a plaster
dome cyclorama and the latest and
and most flexible lighting ejuip-
ment, with a $20,000 switch board.
There. are six dressing rooms, a

For the study of animals, the re-
gian is as well adapted as it is
for the study of plants. Though
the fauna is not so rich as it is in
the southern part of the state,
about 37 species of mammals, 12
amphibians and 12 reotiles are
found in the region, and the num-
ber of individuals is sufficient for
good collecting. About 150 species
of birds have been identified. Aqua-
tic environments of lakes. streams,j
and marshes. cut-over lands in f
various stages of reforestation, and
cedar bog forests are within easy

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Speaking as lecturers on the
physics symposium on theoretical
physics, many prominent men,
both of foreign and national re-
pute, will conduct lectures and dis-
cussion groups here this summer.
Prof. E. A. Milne of Oxford uni-
versity will come to Ann Arbor es-
pecially to lecture upon problems
in astrophysics, and the vector and
tonsor methods in statics and
dymanics. Prof. Leon Brillouin of
the University of Paris will also
come to lecture upon quantum sta-
tistics, particularly Sommerfeld'sj
theory of metals and recent work
on metallic conduction..
Prof. K. F. Herzfeld of physics at
Johns Hopkins university is sched-
uled to lecture upon statistical me-
chanics, including vapor pressure,
and the statistical foundations of
general thermodynamics. Prof.
Edward Condon of Princeton will
give an introduction to quantum
mechanics, and Dr. P. A. M. Dirac

r }_

of Cambridge university will lec-
ture upon advanced quantum me-
chanics, especially the relativity
theory of the electron. Also Prof.j
David M. Dennison will speak on
band spectra.
Groups will be formed for thef
discussion of special subjects
chosen both from the theoretical
lectures and from allied problems.
Symposium lecturers will also con-
duct these meetings for informal
discussion of problems supple-
mentary to the formal lectures.
Varsity Coaches Will
Instruct In Strategy
Instruction this. summer in ath-
letic coaching, physical education,
and administration will be given
under the direction of the Sum-
mer School by virtiually all of- the
Varsity coaches and assistant
coaches.
Courses comprise material in hy-
giene and public health, physical

ticipated attending the Summer -
Session, the following interpreta- For the first time, the School ofi
tion of the University's automobile Education will offer in addition to
regulation has been announced by its conference, a group of non-
W. B. Idea, assistant to the Dean credit courses in educational prob-
of Stidents. The regulation will lems. These courses will extend
not apply first, to those who in the over six wek-ends. and will include
academic year are engaged in pro- lectures and round table discus-
fessional pursuits, as for example, sions led by leaders in the field of
teachers, lawyers, physicians; sec- education and educational admin-
ond, those attending the Public istration.
Health Intitutes; and third, those The week-end of June 29-30, vo-
snecial cases in which, within his cational guidance will be discussed.
discretion, the Dean of Students The conference chairman will be
waives the restriction. Prof. George E. Myers, and Frank,
Application for a limited driving M Leavitt, associate superintendent
icense by persons coming under of schools, Pittsburgh. Pa.. will be,
the third classification may be the speaker.
made at the dean's office. In addi-
tion to the permits granted during Elementary education will be the
the regular academic year to cover next topic. Prof. S. A. Curtis is to
definite needs for the use of cars, be the chairman, and Helen Park-'
limited recreational privileges, for hurst, principal of Children's Uni-
such purposes as golf, tennis and versity School, New York City, will
swimming, , will be extended to speak.
those students who possess satis- Following t h e s e conferences,
factory scholastic records. courses in the public school plant,

access.
health education, the junior high The state game ref uve located on
school, and the senior high school Cecil and Big Stone Bays furnishes
will be conducted. opportunities for the study of cer-
These courses will be open to all tain birds, mammals, and other
without other prereauisites, and veterbrates not available around
problems of the superintendent and Douglas Lake.
principal will receive special em- The facilities of the camp provide
phasis. It is recognized that super- opportunities for independent in-
intendents and princinals are un- vestigators, general living condi-'
able to afford the time for a full tions, including board and lodging,
session, and the non-credit discus- health and recreational advantages
sions' are being established for the of a small-sized community.
purpose of discussing their prob- The field work in geology and
lems in a limited space of time. geography will center around the4
camp in southern Kentucky on .the
The comparative values of short[ upper course of the Cumberland

Ordovician to the Pennsylvanian.
The varied rocks express them-
selves in very different conditions
of structure, surface soils and eco-
nomic conditions.
After the more intensive work at
the station is completed, the field
paries will make a reconnaissance
trip eastward across the Cumber-
flah'd Plateau, the great valley of
Eastern Tennessee, the Great
Smoky Mountains, the Piedmont
Plateau, and the Atlantic Coastal
plain.

I

education and organized Dlav. the

A SuburbanH e
A nice setting and would be ideal for
summer, or, all year round home. Large
lot with garden spot and fruit trees-A
good six-room house with furnace heat, a
well operated by electric pump-There is
a garage also, and the property can be
bought for only $4,500.
ANN ARBOR HOME BUILDERS, INC,
F. P. Cory, Pres. S. Schultz, V. P. E. H. Smith, Sec.-Treas
1250 N. Main St. Phonic 7408
Returni g Ho e
Here is a way by which you can save some actual
money and at the same time enjoy a nice motor tig home
and the use of a car through vacation season.
BUY A USED CAR FROM US,
Drive it home and through vacation and you can then
sell it no doubt for as much as it will cost you here. Just now
we have a very large assortment to choose from and at very
reasonable prices.
Select your car now and we will hold
it and have it all ready when you are ready
to leave.
SCe us at ohe.
OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS

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and long skirts was the subject of a
long discussion in a speech class of1
the College of Industrial Arts in
Texas.
TRANSPORTATION STU DENTSti"
Arrangements now effective pro-
vide an opportunity for transpor-
tation students who are leaving
school or graduating to learn the
transportation business from the
basic principals to the highest!
specialized division of this Indus-
try
Appointments will be made with
the General Manager for confer-
ences to be held in Ann Arbor.
Students interested are to write
to the General Manager, giving
briefly their aims for the future.
Address: General Manager,
Adrian, Michigan
"Th. Short Way" Lines 1

1'

River. The station. which is at
Mill Springs, is located in an area,
containing an excellent succession[
of strata, ranging in age from the'

e-ucaion-nd-.GLn---. n lhihr esx eigos
theory and practice of physical edu- group of three each for men and
cation and athletics, including women, each group comprising one
sports and mass games. Large room and two small ones. A
Pursuant to the establishment of large worship directly under the
a four-year curriculum in physical stage supplies every facility for
- education, athletics and school building and painting scenery.
health, the curricula now provides The aim of the coursese offered
for instruction in all type of phys- under this theater arts program is
ical education activity, leading to to emphasize actual practice and to
the degree of Bachelor of Science in assist the student in arriving att
Education, theories of acting.
SUDDEN
SE RVICE '
tfi

Phone 7102
Sam C. Andres

Sanitary & Heating
ENGINEER

I

215 L. I-luron St.

Ann Arbor, M

Alb
0

,4. 1

I_
ich.
a.

m.C32 ARE d TA: . :WA tMICH

"m"wn

...

The Calkins-Fletcher
The Weekly News of Three Wide Awake Stores
INTERESTING NEW
THINGS AT CA.-L STORES

S.S
. " S

t

EDITORIAL

B

The cereal that's so crisp

-'4
1-'

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you can hear it!
hERE'S a breakfast treat to match the crispesi
spring day that ever brightened the campus.
Just try the new Kellogg cereal-Rice Krispies.
Bubbles of toasted rice. Rich with flavor. And
so crisp they actually crackle in milk or cream.

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° °

BUY FROM HOME-OWNED
DRUG STORES
If chain-stores oftered you better
me- rchadise for less money, they
night attract yonr business.nit when
dlr-ug i5tore:4w"(e by local peopl -
YourII friends, neighbors and fellow-
taxia s-olerthe same values or
even bettcr ones, logic tells yott to
l~atrotiie them,.
When you buy of a omic -owntied
store, yo u moley goes into local
hanks where it is available for loans
to4local people. Chain store receipts
ar banked out of town and, in that
respect, arc a drain ou the community
reso ii res.
I'he 44o nets o4f 1h, thew-owned dirug
stores have their hones here, on which
he- pay taxes. nkey take part in
civic affairs, give to the Comniunity
nult, serve oil committees and help
talc a better city in which to live.
It is all a questiou of give and take.
[t is like the "endless circle" idea.

Among the many new and useful
ti ngs at ("alkins-FPletchuer stores are
the 'Mayflower P-ot Holders, complete
with wall plocket, thr-e in a pocket
for only 2Sc. The Mayflower Dish
Cloths at t oc, or three for 25c are
also selling fast.
MUSICAL POWDER
HOLDERS
Another new arrival that is attract-
inmt a great deal of attention is the
\l usical Powder Box. When Milady
opetls it for a dah of face powder,
tin silvery-notedl bells play a gay song!
The l5 and 1up.r
A RUBBER SOAP BOX
Have vo" seen the new Sani-?oap
twos, made of sponge rulbber ? They
sell here for only 3c and are always
dry, clean and don't slip on porclain
surfaces. Can also be used as a
sponge.
BURGESS SNAP-LITES
rhee are handy little pocket flash-
lights, complete with battery, bulb and
retlector for only Svc! At this price,
everoine should carry one.
FLAGS FOR MAY 30TH
The most Complete collection of fine
radiator Hag sets for Memorial Day are
also on display at the Calkins-Fletcher
stores. A set of five, which will fit
any radiator cap, with golden staffs and
arrow tins for nl-r4 .. T , --

;E KRTSPI S

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