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May 23, 1929 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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HI' MIC14LCAN TEV

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DAVE'V
LLNESS I AMILY
MYKEE.P STAR O0Ut
Was Counted Upon To Give Bolstad
Of Minnesota Hard Fight For
Individual Title
VARSITY TO MEET CHICAGO
Due to the illness of his uncle
in New York City, Dave Ward, Mich-
igan's chief contender for the Con-
ference individual golf title, may
not be able to compete in the Big'
Ten meet to be held next week at
Minneapolis. The Wolverine star
did not leave with the Varsity team
yesterday afternoon when they en-
trained for Chicago for their match
with the Maroons Friday, and in an
interview yesterday Coach True-.
blood stated that the former State
Amateur champion might not be.
able to play at Interlachen for the
Big Ten championship.
Waid's father felt that it Would
le best that he did not leave Ann
Arbor until further news as to the
condition of the ill man was re-
ceived, and as the result the Wol-
verine hopes of copping the Con-i
ference championship, both indi-
vidual and team, took a bit of a
slump. Ward was not needed so
much against Chicago, but his
absence at Minneapolis will be felt
keenly.
Captain Johnny Bergelin will be
slated to play number one against
the Maroons, with Jinr Lewis in
second place, while the remaining
two positions will be decided be-
tween Ahlstrom, Livingston, and
Royston. If Ward is able to get to}
Interlachen next Monday and
Tuesday one of the last three play-
ers will return to Ann Arbor from
Chicago.
Ward was expected to fight out
the individual tilte with Lester Bol-
stad of Minnesota, who held the
crown two years ago but was dis-
placed by Lehman of Purdue, fin-c
ishing second to the Boilermaker
ace. It would have been Bolstad's
third Conference tournament and)
Ward's first.

VARD

MAY

NOT

COMPETE

IN

BIG

TEN

MEET

o G VETERAN ATHLETES MEET STRONG OPPOSITION Fraternity Soft Ba liidTIIITU
Has Great Success, VTRNAHEESME TOG( Finals Set For Today TAflX[ 1111 ~i~~

Horton Smith, who on Wednes-
day reached his twenty-first birth-
day, today stood out as one of the
leading golfers in the country.
Playing in the international golf
tournament at St. Cloud, France,
this lanky, blonde youth, seldom
erring, led a field of 70 profession-
als from the United States, Eng-
land, France, Spain, South Amer-
ica and Argentina, turning in a
card of 132 for 36 of the 73" holes
of medal play.
No French championship everI
has seen such golf as Smith un-
covered Tuesday. He shot a 66 in'
the morning round and hung up!
the same total in the afternoon. In
each round he was five under pars
for the course, which is 71.
By scoring 132 for the 36 holes,
Smith tied the- generally acceinteda
world's record for golf competition,
made in 1926 by Walter Hagen, na-
tional professional golf champion,
in one of his scoring streaks at Del-
aware Water Gap, Pa.
Smith, who played around ti'
course with Arnaud Massy and'
Aubrey Boomer, the home club pro-
fessional played steady golf. Massy.
who has been "looking them over"
in France and Great Britain sine
the early' part of the century, had
this to say about the Missourian.
"He has got what it takes to
make a champion. In a few years1
he is going to be the greatest golfer
in the world."

i
Phi Sigma Delta, last year's fra-

rarorU MIUMAMUT

" ternity baseball champions, will I IlL tiIn Iwu U nIAIti T i
il clash with Sigma Phi at 5:15
:o 1 at 5:1
o'clock this afternoon on Ferry Aibery Boomer Places Second By
rJTE .: :<eld in the finals of the fraternity Virtue of 61 Made In
soft ball tournament being spon- Morning Round
.sored by the Intramural Depart-
ment. SARAZEN PLAYS WELL
4 The defending champions are
the slight favorites to retain their ST. CLOUD, France, May 22.-
title this year, although Sigma Phi Horton Smith, of Joplin, Mo., won
' :will present a strong front in an the French professional golf cham-
e'* attempt to keep their, opponents pionship here today.
from annexing their second His score for the 72 holes was 273.
straight title. Raber is expected to Smith. held the lead, which he
hurl for Sigma Phi, whilo Dolinsky gained yesterday with a pair of
will be on the mound for Phi Sig- 66's, in spite of some sensational
ma Delta. Raber is probably the shooting by Aubrey Boomer, the St.
y 1better pitcher of the two. Cloud pro. Boomer turned in an
Predictions that Phi Sigma Delta almost unbelievable 61 for the 18-
':rwill win are based lagl o h hole course this morning. .
fact that the title holders' hitting Boomer, on the third round of
and fielding are superior to that of the 72-hole championship, had two
Sigma Phi. The difference in the eagles and six birdies. He was never
brand of hurling, however, should in a bunker. All his approaches
rest in favor of the challengers. were squarely on the greens and he
The semi-final round of the con- sank'his putts "from all angles."
solation tournament vill also be When Boomer inished his round
played this afternoon at 5:15. of 61, he was shaking like a leaf
and was so nervous that he said he
01110 !fjTATE CATCHER could hardly sign his card. "I
DECLARED INELGIBLE never putted like that before in my
life," he remarked.
COLUMBUS, O.-James A. Smith, Gene Sarazen also provided some
regular catcher on the baseball fireworks, shooting a 67 for a 54-
team, after admitting his violation hole total of 213. He had birdies
of the Western Conference ruling, for four holes and never once was
was declared ineligible for further above par during the 18 holes.
/46rr '/AA/MO Big Ten athletic competition be- Sarazen finished his final round
Moi.eVR 4N O C.VN1PJC',WNt' cause he participated in a baseball with a score of 72 and a grand total
- Five of the outstanding veteran game in which admission was of 285. He hurried through his last
athletes will battle for honors charged, regardless of whether or 18 holes so he could go to Paris in
in the Western Conference track not he received monetary compere- I time to catch the Ile de France.
EE Tand field gamnes to be held at Dyche sation. boat train leaving at 4 o'clock.
Stadium, Northwestern university -

0

... _ rr

. !

A1*Q7 id- u tD)E. A, = t u QUNV A iA !, t N. ct S
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO --lu t,. tom,
Herbert Geisler, a blind, all-A stu- _________
dent, has beenh elected president of
the seniorlan class. CHANCES OF CONFERENCE TRACK
STARS TN COMTNG BIGl TIEN T

41

NORTH CAROLINA UN
SITY--Every student who c
class here is fined fifty ,gen
the University.
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS
gineering students are repor
6 wearing cream colored cor
decorated with bridges and
appropriate designs.
0
; BIG TEN STANDINGS

IVER- -_

LTAAAII.. A ..1JA 4 Ia

1 11

LEG INJURY To KEEP
CHAPMANFOMMET
Michigan's chances in the Big
Ten outdoor track meet to be held
at Evanston this week-end were
considerably d iim m e d yesterday
afternoon when Chapman, who had
been counted on to take some
points in the broad jump, received
further injury to his leg and will
be unable to make the trip with the
rest of the team.
After the pencil workers had
readjusted their dope sheets to suit
this new condition, they were
forced into further quanderies by
the performance of Brooks, Michi-
gan discus thrower, later in the
afternon. The husky Wolverine
heaved the discus further than it
has ever been thrown before on
Ferry field with a toss of a little
over 149 feet.
Whether this added strength will
counteract the loss of Chapman in
the title meet at Northwestern re-
mains to be seen when the points
are compiled Saturday. It is possi-
ble that Ardent wil be taken on the
trip in the place of Chapman for
the broad jump event.
"Drizzle
drizzle

i
I
t
I

W
MICHIGAN.........4
Wisconsin...........5
Iowa ................ 4
Illinois ............. 5
Northwestern ....... 4
Purdue ............. 4
Minnesota.........2
Indiana ............ 3
Chicago ............ 3
Ohio State......... 3

L.
0
2
2
5
5
5
3
5
5
5

cuts a (Editor's Note.-This is the first of flyer, is the established favorite in on Friday and Saturday.
rts by twoarticles dealing with the Con- the sprints as a result of his sensa- George Simpson, Ohio State's
ference Track Meet scheduled for tional showing this spring. Sirp- flashy sprinter, and winner of both
Friday and Saturday, and takes up son should retain his Conference the 100 and 220 yard dashes last
3-En-track events only. The field events titles in both the 100 and 220 yard year, is an outstanding favorite to
ted to will be considered in tomorrow's races, as he has defeated all comers repeat in his specialty judging from
duroys Daily.) Ito date, having an unofficial mark his performances of this spring. He
other of :09.5 in the century to his credit. will encounter his major competi-
! y EDWARD L. WARNER t Among the other sprinters, Eddie tion from such performers as Tolan,
o With another Big Ten outdoor Tolan of Michigan has shown his Michigan; Timm, Illinois; Larson,
1 track championship scheduled to heels to the field in several races, Wisconsin; Root, Chicago, and Gor-
Pct.. be decided tomorrow and Saturday having defeated Timm of Illinois. don, Indiana.
1.000 at the Dyche stadium in Evanston, Kriss,. a Buckeye teammate of Dave Abbott, the defending cham-
.714 ! it is well to look over the prospects Simpson's, should .add to Ohio's pion in the two mile and a member
.667 j of the various athletes in the quest point total in the dashes. Other of the Olympic team of last sum-
.500 I for laurels. Consequently an at- dashmen given a chance of finish- mer, will encounter plenty of oppo-
.444 I tempt will be made to evaluate the ing among the first five are Timm, sition from such men as Wuerful,j
.444 1 merits of the Big Ten track starsI Root of Chicago, Stevenson and Michigan; Eve-ingham, Iowa; Field,
.400 | and to weigh their chances to place'Stamats of Iowa, and Gordon of Indiana; and Dilloy, Wisconsin, but
.375 ; on the basis of their performances Indiana. appears to be the class of the field
.375 j in previous meets this season. (Continued on Page Seven) (Continued on Page Seven)
.375 100 and 220 Yard tDashes
or George Simpson, the Ohio State

GOLF PLAYERS -Summer Work
Excellent proposition for students who
wish to spend the ENTIRE SUMMER OUT-
OF-DOORS and earn a neat sum of money.
Need not be experts or "pros."
Interview Mr. E. Tobin on Saturday, May 25
from 3 to 6 p. m on the University Golf
- Course at the entrance booth.
Last Opportunity Saturday, May 25th-3 to 6 P. M.
- - -,-

VI

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Pric Redctions
-ON-
Entir e Stock

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
AN EVENT
We have just received an unusual collection of New Suits--
Suits that were made to sell for considerably more.
We are offering them Friday and Saturday at a price that
pronounces them the

~7
IT's bound to rain sometimes,
even in the best regulated cli-
mates. But don't let that make
any party of yours a fizzle.
A Fish B'rand Slicker is a
comfortable, chummy sort of
garment that makes good
times possible regardless of
storms and showers.
You can buy a genuine Fish
Brand Slicker almost any-
where for the price of a cuple
of theatre tickets. A. J. Tower
Company, Boston, Mass.

MOST OUTSTANDING VALUES OF
THE SEASON
$ --00
~25
(Extra trousers $5.00)
Do not let this go by without investigating.

MANY MODELS AT

$"16

.65

Others From $7.35 to $12.80

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