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May 19, 1929 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-19

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ESTABLISHED
1890.

JrY

*iiy

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXXIX,, Vol. 170 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 19, 1929

EIGHT PAGES

SBEC

i_
1
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S

aRTH

13-0

Varsity
WOLVERINES SHO

Thinclads Drop Close Meet To Illinois

W

V.

Veteran Twirler
Holds Wildcat

i

UEP DTo Single Blow I
BUTLS73 TO62
Closing Rush In Final
Events Decides
Supremacy
POORMAN WINS SHOT PUT
T lan Pull S urprise
By Beating Timm
In Dashes
By George Taubeneck, Sports Editor
The Daily Illini
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., May 18.-An
unexpectedly strong Michigan track
team accompanied a driving rain-
storm into the stadium this morh-
ing, and the combination came un- _
comfortably close to putting a
heavy wet blanket upon Illini as- Fred Asbeck
pirations for an undefeated season who hurled his fifth consecutive
in dual meets. A closing rush in victory against a Northwestern
the .final events enabled Illinois to team yesterday, allowing one hit
win, 73 to 62. and no runs.
Tarbill Wins Low Hurdles
Eddie Tolan did the expected by
Winning both the 100 and 220 yard
dashes, but his time in each event.
considering the fact that they were I A Q E IN I
running in the rain and over aI
t ack which was inches deep in wa- LO
ter, was unexpectedly fast.{
Pushed to the tape by Jud Timm,
who is always a good mudder on
either the- ,gridiron or the cinder Students Ma Attend
path, Tolan copped the century in May
9.9 seconds. With a little less dif-) Appreciatory
fculty the Negro flash ran away inner
from Cave of Illnois in the 220 in 3
21.3 seconds. nh Inasmuch as it has been er-
Handsome and debonair "Bud" roneously rumored that the all-stu-
Poorman also listed up to advance dent, appreciatory banquet, which
publicity by taking the shot put will be tendered President Clarence
with a heave of 42 feet, 1 inch. Cook Kjttle and Mrs Little next
Poorman was not at all extended Thursday night would be an
to beat his teammate, Brooks, and invitational affair, tickets for all
Burdick, Of Illinois, who took third. students wishing to attend may
Wolves Get Slam in Discus be secured at the State street book-
The big surprise of the day was stores tomorrow and Tuesday, it was
furnished by Tarbill, Michigan announced last night by Chester C.
hurdler, who edged out Jimmy Cave Bennett, '29, chairman of the ticket
of Illinois in the 220 yard low hur- mncommittee. .
diles in the remarkably fast time Numerous frateranties have ar-
of 23.5 seconds, which equalled the ranged to attend the dinner en bloc,
dual meet record, and independents may obtain their
covers at the above named places.
Summaries:1 The time of the dinner will be 6
100 yard dash.-Won by Tolan, o'clock, and will last only until 8
(Mich.); Time, (Ill), second; Cave, o'clock in order that the guests may;
(Ill.), third. Time--:099. attend the May Festival concert
Mile run.--Woh by Seldon, (Ill.); immediately following.
Stine, (Ill.), second; Bunning, (I1.,1 It was learned last night that in
third. Time-4:284. order to assure that the banquet be
?20 yard dash.-Won by Tolan, kept a strictly student affair, a re-
(Mich.); Cave, (Ill.), second; Burk- quest from Ann Arbor business men
hart, (Ill.), third Time-:21.3. for 100 covers was refused. Further,
120 yard high hurdles.-Won by the program as announced Friday
Rodgers, (Ill.); Sentman, (Ill.), includes only student speakers,
second; Trimble, (Ill.), third. Time aside from the response of Presi-,
-:14.8 dent Little' himself. George F.
Shot put.-Won by Poorman, Rich, '30L., will be toastnaster, and
(Mich.); Brooks, (Mich.), second; j music will be furnished by Bob Car-'
BuMdick, (Ill), third. Distance-42 son's band A surprise of an unex-E
feet, 1 inch. pected nature, whose identity is
440 yard dash.---Won by Dalton being rigidly guarded, will come to
Seymour (Mich.; Dale Seymour, light during the banquet, it was in-]
(Mich..), second; Kelly, (Ill, third., timated by Thomas C. Winter, '30
Time-: d50. KIB.Ad., last night.
Two mile run--Won by Abbott, - -
(ill.); Austin, (Mich.), second; HOUSES ADJOURN ;
Tockstein, (Ill.), third. Time-9:39. FOR GOLF LINKS
(New dual meet record). G
Discus throw.--Won by Sander- Farm Rn'ief And Tariff Laid Aside
son, (Mich.) ;Brooks, (Mich.), sec- Until Monday; Congressmen
ond; Carlson, (Mich), third. Dis- Take Afternoon Off
tance-136 feet, 5% inches. eA ro f
Pole vault.-Won by McDermot, (By Associated Press)
(Ill.); Harper, (Ill.), second; Cash, WASHINGTON, May 18.--Con-
(Ill.), third. Height-12 feet, 9 in. gress laid aside farm relief and
220 yard low hurdles.-Won by tariff today for baseball.
Tarbill, (Mich.); Cave, (Ill.), sec- Both houses were in adjourn-1
ond; Sentman, (Ill.), third Time- ment but the Republican members

:23.5.-(Ties meet record). of the House ways and means corn-
High jump.-Hill, (Ill.), and Fel- mittee continued their efforts to
ker, (Mich.), tied for first; Carr, i smooth the grievances among
(Ill.), third. Height-5 feet, 9 3-8 members of their party from agri-
inches. Icultural states.
880 yard run.-Won by White, The farm relief bill meanwhile
(Ill.); Orlovich, (Ill.), second; Lo- had been given to a conference]
Mont, (Mich.), third. Time-1:57.1.1 committee, which will hold its first
Broad ,jump.-JWon by Simon, meeting Monday to attempt to
(Ill.); Chapman, ,(Mich.), second; reconcile the differences between1
Roi in rm (7 1) + hir- Din tane. __-22, thn turn .n. s .p - -,r. ri

SIX CONCIRTS WILL
MAKE UP PROGRAM
FOR MAYFESTIVAL
"Samson And Delilah"
To Be Presented
On Saturday
ZIMBALIST WILL APPEAR

I
.j

S tudents Offered Pay
IAs Undercover Agents
Brown University Head Condemns
Providence Administrator's
Proposition, However

(By Associated Tress)
PROVIDENCE, R. I., , May 18.-
By becoming an "undercover"
agent and getting evidence. of
ownership of prohibited alcoholic
beverages any student of Brown
University accepting the offer wvill
be paid $5 a day, Deputy"Prolibi-
tion Administrator John W. Morrill
in this city announced today.
President W. H. T. Fense of
Drown, when informed of the of-1
fer, said: "I should prefer to .be
the student here engaged in other
and more uplifting callings in ob-
taiing money for their college ex-
1penses."
o I
RAIN HALTS TENNIS MATCH J
Rain caused the cancelling of 11
the tennis matches scheduled j
I between Illinois and Michigan I
which were to have been play- I
I ed at Champaign yesterday
afternoon.

ECKENERIEXAMINES
ZEPEI ENGINES
FOR MOTOR DEFE11CT
Breakdown Accidental
According To
Captain
OWNER DENIES SABOTAGE
After Being Repaired
Graf Will Fly
Back HomeI
(Ry Asswiated Press)
CUERS, France, May 18.---Dr.
Hugo Eckener, after a day spent in
careful examination of his crippledI
ship the Graf Zeppelin left1 to-
night for Friedrichshafen. He had!

Wildcats H eld
To Single Hit;
SevenMen Fan
PURPLE GET DANGEROUS ONLY ONCE,
IN SECOND, WHEN SINGLE
THREATENS RALLY
EVANSTON, Ill., May 18.-Led by Giant Fred Asbeck,
who limited the locals to a lone scratch single while the Wolves
were feasting on the offerings of three Wildcat hurlers, Michigan
easily swamped Northwestern here today, 13 to 0, thereby retaining
' unblemished record at the top of the Conference standings, with
four victories in as many starts.
Always a nemisis to the Wildcats, Asbeck today made no
exception, turning in the most brilliant of his five wins over the Purple.
Oliphant's scratch infield single to Weintraub, opening the second
inning whose throw he barely beat by a step, prevented the Wo-
verine veteran from attaining a position in baseball's hall of fame

Two Matinee Programs
Also To Feature
Week's List
- Opera stars, oatorio singers, and
instrumentalists with conductors
and directors supplemented by the
Chicago Symphony orchestra, Uni-
versity Choral Union and a large
chorus of school children will as-
semble their artistic assets for the
annual May Festival which will
take place May 22-25, inclusive.
This event, which is the thirty-
sixth annual occasion of its kind,
will consist of six concerts each of
which has been built in confo'mity
to the ten concerts given earlier in
the season in the Choral Union se-I
ries, as well as a part of the Fes-
tival as a whole.
Two concerts stand out as artistic
programs, that on Wednesday night i
and that on Friday night. At the
former concert, Sophie Braslau,
contralto, and Richard Crooks,
tenor, will be supported by Fred-
rick Stock, conductor, and the or-
chestra players. At the other artist
concert on Friday night, Edith Ma-
son, soprano, and a member of the
Chicago Civic Opera company, will
be heard for the first time in Ann
Arbor.
Barre Hill On Program
Two afternoon concerts will be'
provided, one on Friday and the
other on Saturday. The Friday
afternon concert will, as usual, uti-
lize a large chorus of young people
whao have been trained during the
past year by Miss Juva Higbee. On
the same program the Hungarian
violinist, Efrem Zimbalist, will ap-
pear- as soloist. This will be his
first appearance with an orchestra.
Barre Hill, another member of
the Chicago Civic Opera company,
and trained in the University
School of Music, will also appear
on this program. in a group df
arias. hill has sung the past year
with the Chicago association.
Saturday afternoon F r e d r i c k
Stock and his orchestra and Joseph
Hofmann, the pianist, will provide
the entertainment. Hofmann has
for many yeais been at the pinacle
of pianistic fame.
Choral Union To Give Concert
Two other concerts of widely dif-
ferent types will be heard. On
Thursday night the University
Choral Union assisted by soloists
with the Chicago Symphony or
chestra uider the baton of Musical
Director Earl V. Moore will present
two choral works. Jeannette Vree
land, oratorio singer, and Lawrence
Tibbett, baritone of the Metropoli-
tan Opera (company, will supply the
solo parts.
The final concert in the series
Saturday night will assemble the
Chicago orchestra, Choral Union,
and a group of stars for a per-
formance of "Samson and Delilah."
Solo parts will be sung by Nevada
Vandeveer, contralto who is tak-
ing the place of Marion Telva,
Paul Althouse, tenor of the Metro-
'olitan Opera house, Richard Bo-
nelli, baritone of the Chicago Civic
Opera company, and William Gus-
tafson, basso of the Metropolitan
Opera company.
Comedy Club Takes
Nine New Members
Nine students 'interested in cam-
pus dramatics were voted into,
membership into Comedy Club at a
recent meeting of that organiza-
tion. Membership is not limited to
anv n emholnrl new ommifrsi t

i

o-. made plans for putting the dirig-
ible back into air service and had
characterized as "absurd" reports
that sabotage was responsible fgrl
the breakdown of four of the five
motors on Thursday.
Eckener Surveys Craft
RThe dirigible commander has left
to his staff the task of installing
new motors, expected from Fried-
richshafen tomorrow or Monday.I
Traditional Ceremony The airship is scheduled to leave!
. early Monday or Tuesday morning
Will Be Held for its home port where it will be
Wednesday completely overhauled. The start
-.,.. of the next attempt to fly to Amer-
Unless yesterday's threat of rain ica has been tentatively set for t
culminates in torremtial downpours June.
Wednesday night, members of the - Before giving the craft into!
class of 1929 in the various schools charge of others Dr. Eckener made
and colleges of the University will i a long survey of all of its parts in
at that time gather on the diagonal consultation with the zeppelin ex- X
in front of the library to lift their pert Dimiling of Friedrichshafen.,
voices in song, according to Herbert Whether this examination threw
Palmer, '29, chairman of the senior further light on the cause of the r
sing committee. motor trouble was not made public,
A stand has already been erected but Dr. Eckener was emphatic in
opposite the diagonal door of the saying the breakdowns were nat-!
library, to accommodate members ural and accidental. E
of the Varsity band, who will be Thousands of automobiles poured !
on hand to furnish music, and the into this little aviation village to-'
University Men's Glee club, which day, bringing French aviation ex-Y
will lead in the singing. It is ex- perts as well as curious civilians to
pected that Theodore Harrison, of visit the Graf Zeppelin in her1
the School of Music, will be avail- hangar.
able to direct the mass singing. Spectators Are Numerous z
The purpose of the annual Senior "No one is barred," ruled Dr.t
sing, according to officials, is to Eckener. "I am so deeply appreci-.
furnish graduating students an op- ative of the assistance and welcome1
portunity to gather for a final of the French at this untowardt
happy time together, when freshly- ! landing that I can take no excep- I
<;reeend lawns and newly-leaved tion to their seeing all they wantr
trees make the campus more beau- of our craft.'
tiful than it is at any other time Some of the passengers, far from t
of the year. discouraged at their experience,'
Besides the traditional Michigan1 announced they would not cancel1
;:ongs, such as "Yellow and Blue," their booking and would fly with
"Victors," "Varsity," and "College the Zeppelin if and when she
Days," a number of other songs will started to America again. These
be on the program, according toj sought hotel accommodations at
Palmer. ~Toulon, content to sleep.

TO OPENMONDAY
Henderson Will Direct
Plays At League
Theatre'
Opening for a three weeks' run at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre to-
morrow night, a group of players
directed by Robert Henderson, will
present George Arliss' original pro
duction, "The Green Goddess.""Five
performances of this vehicle will be
given, during the week along with
four performances of George Ber-
nard Shaw's "You Never Can Tell."
The former production will be
given Monday and Tuesday rights,
Wednesday matinee and night, and
Fi iday night. Shaw's comedy will
be presented Thursday matinee and
night , and Saturday matinee and
night.
Reynolds Evans, who appears
here in "The Vikings," plays the
role of the Raja of Rukh in the
first production. The plot is about
a party that is wrecked in an air-
plane in the Kingdom of ttukh and
the melodramatic theme is built
aroundthe Raja's scheme of deal-
ing with his visitors.
The technical staff of the com-
pany have constructed a huge idol
to use in the scenes, and has em-
ployed two native Hindus to assure
the authenticity of the native lan-
guage used in the play.
William Archer, the author, con-
ceived the idea for the plot in a
dream and after attempting to get
several playwrights to carry out the
action for him, undertook the task
himself. Archer spent most of his
life in an attempt to elevate the
theatre, and it is ironic that this
one play should be his greatest
success.
'Tickets for the performance may
be secured by calling the box office
of the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
T'ickets for the showings are priced
at 50 cents for the matinees and
75 cents for the night perform-
ances.
Man And Woman Will
Seek Endurance Mark
Roosevelt Field, N. Y., May 18--
A man and a woman Friday an-
nounced plans for separate at-
tempts to better the world's refuel-
ing endurance flight record by 150
hours, 40 minutes, and 15 seconds
established in January by the Army
plane Question Mark at Los Angeles
Lieut. H. B. Clarke, former man-
ager of Roosevelt Field, will com-
mand one plane and the other will
be in charge of Viola Gentry, for-
mer holder of the solo endurance
flight record for women.

-with a no-hit, no-run performance.
His feat was all the more credit-
able considering the freezing cold
weather and the strong wind which
blew off the lake. Besides his work
on the mound, Asbeck led the as-
sault on the Wildcats, getting three
singles and a walk in five trips to
the plate.
Michigan had no trouble in reach-
ing each of the three opposing
pitchers, and from the outset it ap-
peared that the "giant killers" were
in for a hard afternoon. The Wol-
verines garnered fourteen hits for a
total of twenty-two bases, while
playing errorless ball behind their
"Giant" hurler.
Oliphant Gets Only Hit
Northwestern's lone threat caime
in the second inning when Ol-
phant led off with the only hit the
Wildcats could- gather. Kadison
popped to McCoy but Schwartz
walked. The men died on first
and second however, when Carey
whiffed and Heideman died, Asbeck
to McCoy.
Michigan started early, getting
two runs in each of the first and
second innings and four markers in
the third. After one had been re-
tired in the first, Corriden singled
to left and scored on Straub's dou-
ble over third. Straub scored when
Schwartz threw wild to first on
Weintraub's grounder, after Kubi-
cek had been retired. One hit, an
' error, a sacrifice, and a man hit by
pitcher gave the Wolverines two
more runs in the second.
Wolves Score Heavily
Four runs, gathered in the third,
put the game on ice for the Wolver-
ines. Straub led off with A sing~le,
Kubicek walked, and Weintraub
beat out a bunt filling the bases.
McCoy bounced to Schwartz and
Straub was forced at thewate, on a
similar play, Kubiceh was safe at
home when Schwartz' throw was
wide of the plate. Truskowski sin-
gled to left, Weintraub and McCoy
scoring, and Asbeck walked,again
filling the bases. Heideman was
replaced by Weil, a southpaw, who
retired the side, with Olly Myron
scoring after Rojan allowed the
third strike on Nebeluxg to get

BARKER EMPHASIZES DIFFERENCE
BETWEEN NATURAL, POSITIVE LAW
Enphasizing the vast difference necessity of a supreme legal power
that existed between the British embodied in definite form. ThisI
and colonial conceptions of law demaiid was met in 1787 by the for-
a ulation of the constitution of thel
during the latter part of the eigh-United States. From that time on
teenth century, Prof. Ernest Barker your country cannot be said to base
of Cambridge University explained its government on a system of na-
one of the most important causes tural law.
of the American revolution in a lec- Professor Barker concluded by
ture, "American Ideas During the pointing out that though the ideal-
Revolution," given yesterday morn- ism in a belief in man's natural
ing in Angell hall. rights is commendable and inspir-
"The English idea," he said "con- ing, nonetheless it is impractical
sisted of a rigid adhorence to one and out of place in an organized
law-positive law, which was made government. "It's whole trouble"'
and regulated by parliament. Man's he said, "lies in the fact that there
innate rights were to them things is no infallible source to which we
metaphysical, not to be considered may turn for a definite statement
in problems of government. Wholly of what constitutes these rights of
contrary to this conception was the man by nature."
continental belief in two laws-
positive law and natural, i. e., the
law of man's rights by nature." , urN eather4an I
"It seems," he- continued "that
American opinion was influenced -
mainly by the continental ideal, and
those beliefs furnished the colonies r
with the necessary 'grounds in I. ,
breaking away from the mother
country.

1
1
i
(
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C
t
s
E
i
i

away froi him.
Box score:
Michigan AB
Nebelung, cf. .... 6
Corriden, lf. ......3
Straub, rf.......4
Kubicek, 2b. ..... 4
Weintraub, 3b. ... .6
McCoy, lb.......5
Myron, ss. ....... 4
Truskowski, c. ... 2
Asbeck, p.......4
Totals........38
Northwestern AB
Jacobs, cf.......3
Waniata, 3b.... 3
Isard, 3b. 1
Rojan, c...... 4
McAleece, rf.,....3
Schuett, rf......1
Oliphant, lb.. 2
Kadison, 2b.... 3
Schwartz, ss. 2
Dempsey, ss... 0

R
0
1
2
2
2
3
3
0
0
13
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
3
14
u
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

PO A E
1 0 0
1 0 0
1 0 0
1 0 0
2 3 0
9 1 0
4 2 0
7 0 0
1 1 0

27
Po
1
2
1
7
0
0
11
4
1
0

7
A
0
0'
0
3
0
0
2
1
3
0

0
F
0
0
0
1
0
Q-
1
0
2
0

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