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May 18, 1929 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-18

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PAGEKIGHT

M r, T r, T-T T r, A N

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A'U:i t I!1', A 18, 1929

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLHIN
Publication in the Bulletin is contructive notice to all members
1:of the University. Copy received by the Assistant JA the Presi-
dent until 3:30 p. m. (11:30 a. m. Saturday.)
Vol. XXXIX SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1939 No. 169
University Lecture:
Prof. Ernest Barker of Cambridge University, England, (Lowell
Institute Lecturer, 1929), will lecture on ''American ideas during the
Revolution," on Saturday morning, 11 o'clock, May 18, in room 1025
Angell Hall.
Xse S. Reeves, C. 11. Van Tyne
Oratorical Association Lecture Curse:
Members of the Lecture Committee would be very happy to receive
suggestions from faculty and students concerning numbers for next
year's course.
J. M. O'Neill
Acolytes:
There will be a meeting of the Society on Monday, May 20, at 7:30
p. in., in 202 S. W. D . David Riork will speak on "The Integration of
the Personality'
Otis 11. Lee
Web & Flange:
The last meeting of the semester will be held at the Michigan
Union, Tuesday, May 21, 1929, at 7:15 p. in. It is very important that
all members be present at the time for election of officers.
L. K. Wenzel
League of Nations Association Luncheon:
Reservations for the League of Nations Association luncheon in
honor of Miss Jean Anderson of Ann Arbor, winner of the second
national prize in the League of Nations examination, can still be
-secured by calling 8133. Alden G. Alley, popular speaker and lecturer
on international affairs will be the principal speaker. Prof. Thomas
Reed will preside. Michigan Union, 12:15 promptly, Saturday, May 18.
Nan Johnson, Chairman
The Philippine-Michigan Club:
There will be a meeting of this club on Sunday, May 19, at 3:00
p. m., in Wesley Hall, corner of East Huron and Washington. Among
the things to be taken up is the proposed picnic and dance in the
afternoon of Memorial Day, May 30. Every Filipino in the city is
urged to be present at the meeting.
C. G. Manuel, Secretary
Hiudustan Club:;
. The regular meeting of the Hindustan Club will be held on Sunday,
May 19, 1920, at 2:30 p. in., in Lane Hall. The officers for the coming
year will be elected. All the members of the Club are requested to be
present.
S. A. Rahman, Sec.-
Round Table Club:
The last meeting of the semester will be held in the Union, room
302, Sunday, May 19, at 2:30. Mr. Neil Staebler will speak on "Working
in the Chicago Stockyards." All are welcome.
Executive Committee
C. C. Van Vechten
Choral Union Ushers:
The names of extra men chosen to assist the regular Choral Union
' shers in Hill Auditorium during the May Festival will appear in this
cpluin Tuesday morning.
yW. A. Davenport
Oighway Engineering Positions:
Messrs, Burton and Fitzgerald of Michigan State Highway Dept.,
will be here Tuesday, May 21, about 10:00 a. in., to interview students
who wish empoyment with the Department. They have permanent
positions open to graduating Civil Engineers, and also a limited num-
ber of sumnmer positions for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. Those
interested 4may interview these gentlemen at room 1224, East Engineer-
Ing Building, either in the morning or about 1:00 p. mi.
R. L. Morrison

i
i

'PH IUfFfSinclair Loses Fight
, ToEscape Sentence'
BY PHILLI1PS R[VEALSI
LARGE AMOUNT OF SOURCE
MATERIAL PRESENTED
BY AUTHOR
4INCEIVES 1928 PRIZE 1
Social and Economic Development
of Old South Outlined Up to
Time of Civil War:

Having received the $2,500 prize
in 1928 for the best unpublished
work on American history. "Life
and Labor in the Old South" by
Prof. U. B. Phillips of the history
department has been recently re-
leased.
Social anad economic developmnent
in the South up to 1861 is the chief
concern of the book. A vast amount
of source material has been used in
the book. This was collected by
P ofessor Phillips, who is a native
of Georgia, and is the foremost au-
thority in this country on the slave
system with' its various ramifica-
tions.
Writen in an informal style, the
chapters being divided into sec-
tions, each dealing with an indi-
vidual phase of the general subject.
Beginning with a geological and
climatic description of the South,
he follows with the story of the
colonization of the seaboard.
The extracts of letters between
slave holders reveal the peculia,
sentiments which existed in that
day toward the ownership of the
slaves. To the people of today who
h'ave never come in contact with
such a system, the mixed attitude
of first mercenary, and then hu-
mane, is quite difficult to under-
stand. On one hand the slave owner
will refer to the thousands of dol-
lars in "horseflesh" which a certain
slave has saved him during his life-
time, and then, almost in the same
breath will exp ess his affection for
the old black and his desire to pro-
vide for his bodily comfort to the
last.
Such situations strengthen the
contention of southerners that the
northerners did not understand the
true relation between the good
planter and his servant, and vice
versa.
Vancouver, British Columbia:
Women's organizations in British
Columbia have started a movement
to secure a department of home
economics at the University of
IBritish Columbia in Vancouver,
' The members of these organiza-
tions hope to have girls trained in
household arts .and the best
methods of home management.
The educational authorities of the
government have promised to give
careful consideration to the plans
submitted by the women.I
7'

Callaway Champions
Des Moines Students I
Before Baptist Union
Dr. Shields Counters Lecture
By Interrupting With
Questions
Presenting the "other side" of the
student rebellion at Des Moines uni-
versity, fundamentalist institution,
Dean E. C. Callaway championed
the cause of the rebel students and
dismissed faculty before a "packed
convention" of the Baptist Bible
union at Buffalo, yesterday.
Dean Callaway was introduced by
Dr. Thomas T. Shields, president of
the board of trustees and leader of
the opposing camp, who stated that
he would question the speaker when
finished. According to Callaway,
the advertising received as a result
of the firing of its board of trustees
has already proved injurious to the
school, the state having taken away
the institution's credits.
Dr. Shields repeatedly interrupted
Dean Callaway whose speech was
more of an educational treatise
than an oratorical defense. Upon
finishing, the dean questioned Dr.
Shields, who more or less facetious-
ly answered, "Brother Callaway has
been hoodwinked and doesn't know
what he is talking about."
Thirty Junior College
Men Feted On Campus
Thirty engineering students from
tie Junior College at Grand Rapids
are being entertained here this
week end as guests of the Univer-
sity of Michigan.
The program opened last night
withna banquet at the Michigan
Union. Dean H. C. Sadler of the
College of Engineering acted as
toastmaster, and following his ad-
dress of welcome, Prof. L. M. Gram
discussed "Engineering Training,"{
Prof. A. H. White spoke on "The
Post-Graduate Engineers," while
'Research Engineering" was the
topic of Prof. A. E. White's speech.
Prof. R. A. White of Grand Rapids
Junior College closed the program
with his address on "Selection of
An Engineering College."
Following the banquet the visit-
ors attended Cap Night ceremonies.
This morning an inspection trip
is planned for the students. The
tour will start at the Union at 9
o'clock and will include the auto-
motive laboratories, naval tank,
steam laboratories, electrical labo-
ratory, and wind tunnel.'
A general sight-seeing route over
the campus will take the visitors to
the Museum, Dental building,
Women's League, Hospital, Law
club, Angell hall, Yost Field house,
Intramural building, and stadium.

TO OUR MANY PATRONS;
AUlprofits from the coming season of
plays go to help redeem the large ple dls
taken by the Ann Arbor Michigan Wouen
to cover the heavy expenses of the League
building.
Already through this professional
company, which has played for three
seasons under the auspices of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, the League has benefited
thousands of dollars. The coming season
is NOT for PERSONAL PROFIT.
The League plans always to present
the finest outside professional attractions
to Ann Arbor, when it is NOT IN USE
by student organizations.
L dia Mendelssohn Theatre
beginning

MONDAY,SA

20

Harry F. Sinclair,
millionaire oil magnate and sports-?
man, who has lost a prolonged legal
battle to evade a ninety-day sen-
tence to federal imprisonment. He
was convicted of contempt of the
United States Senate for refusing
to appear before the senate investi-
gation committee to answer ques-
tions concerning the Teapot Dome
oil case four years ago. The su-
preme court has affirmed the de-
cision of the convicting jury.
Rangers Club To Plan
Means Of Reforesting
An attempt to determine means
of increasing the forest returns of
woodlot lands to local residents is
to be made by members of the 4-H
and Forest Ranger clubs of Wash-
tenaw county, it was announced
yesterday by Prof. E V. Jotter, of
the school of forestry and conser-
vation.
This action was taken at a meet-
ing of the clubs recently. Accord-
ing to present plans the 4-H and
Forest Ranger clubs will conduct a
woodlot survey of Washtenawcoun-
ty.

3 WEEKS OF PLAYS
t_______FIRST WEEK ____
MONDAY, MAY 20
William Archer's Melodrama
The Green Goddess
TUESDAY
The Green Goddess
WEDNESDAY MATINEE AND NIGHT
The Green Goddess
THURSDAY MATINEE AND NIGHT
Bernard Shaw's Gay Farce
You Never Can Tell
FRIDAY
The Green Goddess
SATURDAY MATINEE AND NIGHT
You Never Can Tell
COMING
"Nightstick"-"The Spider"
Including: Reynolds Evans, Robert Henderson, Suzanne
Freeman, Arthur Kohl, Ralph Menzing, Edward Everett
Hale III, Elberta Trowbridge, Lillian Bronson.
Prices: Evenings 75c, Matinees 50e
Buy tickets in advance
Now on sale at box office. Phone 6300.
READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS!

f

....... 7

FLORIDA ORANGES
GRAPEFRUIT

AND

A Carload on First Between West
Jefferson and "Williams Streets
75c Peck
Tangerines 50e Full Half Peek
All Tree Ripe Fruit, Washed.
Polished, and Graded
New York Listed
I Stocks

LAST NIGHT
PLAY PRODUCTION
Presents
The Kaufman & Connelly Comedy Hit
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
Women's League Building
at 8:15

A

Private wires to all
Markets

a-
Saturday Night Will See The Finish
Of Our
Annual
May Clearance Sale
If You Have Not Taken Advantage of This Sale You
Still Have a Chance.
25 % Is Rather Good Return on
Your Investment
TINKER & COMPANY
South State Street at William Street
Serving University Men For Over Thirty Years.

Conservative margin accounts
solicited

Telephone 22541
Brown-Cress &
Inc

ca.,

Investment Securities
7th Flpur First Nat'l
Bank Bldg.

I

4

Box Office Open at 10
PHONE 6300

A. M.

Want Ads Pay

ยง

'I
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SENIORS-Just to Remind you
That it is time to leave your orders for
ENGRAVED CARDS

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