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May 29, 1929 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-29

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ESTABLISHED
1890

lC.g

WIkWN

ANN m

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXXIX, No. 167 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1929

EIGHT PAGES

REIF

ELECTED

TO

HE

0

E

co u

IL

(!)

Lloyd Defeats Wilcox For Union Presidency

100 PERSONSil DIE
lI DIASTROUS I
CLEVELAND F1IE!---
EXPLOSIONS IN C L E V E L A N D Kenneth Lloyd
CLINIC FOLLOW FIRING A novice in the
OF X-RAY FILMS political f i e 1fd,
rode into office
OXYGEN MAY SAVE OTHERS behind 854 votes
to attain the
presidency of the
Noxious Fumes Filter From Base- Union. His oppo-
ment Asphyxiating Those Cut Off . sition in the race
From Means of Escape was J a c k s o n
Wilcox, who gar-
BULLETIN nered 582 votes
(By Associated Press) to run second.
CLEVELAND, May 15.-Policeman
Ernest Staab, 30, of No. 1 emer-
gency wagon, sacrificed his life to
achieve the removal of 21 bodies .
from the blazing gas-filled Cleve-
land Clinic. Staab arrived while
the fumes still clogged the entrance
but time after time pushcd his :>g
way into the darkened halls, facing

Ernest eif
The new presi-
dent of the Stu-
dent council.
Reif was elected
by a large major-
ity and was op-
posed by George'
Simons, who was
second at they
time of the final
c o u n t i ng, and
Je n n i n g s Mc-
Bride.

THAYER TO HLD
SECRETARIAL JOB
IN ORGANIZATION

SPING FESTIVAL
SERIES INCLUDES
i SIX OFFERINS

Inlander Contest
Attracts Record
GroupOf Poets
Closing last evening, the In-
lander poetry contest has been an-
nounced by the staff to be one ofI
the most successful in recent years.
A count of the verse turned in re-
vealed a total of 163 poems, 36 of
which are sonnets submitted for
the special sonnet prize.
Preliminary judgment of the
verse will be made immediately by

Drake,Webster
Win Decisively
In Campus Vote
Polling a majority of the votes in a three-cornered fight,
Ernest C. Reif, '30, was elected president of the Student council
for the coming year, yesterday in the annual all-campus election.
Reif, who is a 'varsity swimmer, and was a councilman for the
past year, won over George E. Simons, '30, and Jennings McBride,
'30, with a vote of 751 against 422 and 296, respectively, for his

LLOYD HAS BEEN ACTIVE
UNION FOR MORE THAN
TWO YEARS

IN

CCONCERTS MARK CLIMAX
FIFTY YEARS' MUSICAL
ACTIVITIES
WILL LAST FOUR DA

OF

NEW COUNCIL OHSENI

AYS

Murphy,
Scott,

Scover, Waddell, Felton,
And Hunt Will Serve
On New Board

Sophie Braslau, Richard Crooks TMd
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
On First Program

Mrs. C. C. Little, Prof. Erich A.
opponents. Other victories of high order were those of Ormand
and Prof. DeWitt H. Parker of the J. Drake, '30, for presidency of the Oratorical association, and
philosophy department. Poems ie- John E. Webster, '30, for president of the Student Christian asso-
maining in the contest after their .- ..

r

John Webster
Swept aside
opposition and
was elected to'
the presidency of
the Student
Christian asso-
ciation in the
all-campus elec-
tion yesterday
by an over-
whelming ma-
jority.

almost positive death.
It became certain tonight at
Mount Sinai hospital some of those
he removed will live tonight; some
died as he carried them to open
air. But Staab worked away as
the fatal M gas slowly destroyed his
lungs. The policeman collapsed
after carrying out his 21st burden.
He followed those he rescued to an
emergency cot and died a few hours
later:

Ormand Drake
Who last night
won the position
of president of
t h e Oratorical
Association for
the coming year.
Drake, who won

In one of the most hotly contect-
ed races of the all-campus election
yesterday, Kenneth M. Lloyd, '30,
was chosen president of the Union
over Jack Wilcox, '30, by the narrow
majority of 854 votes to 582. For
recording secretary of the Union,
James Thayer, '30, defeated Robert
S. McCoy, '30, by 742 votes cast to
the latter's 586.
Six Vice President's Elected
Six vice-presidents were eletced
who will serve on the Union Board
of Directors besides holding exec-
utive offices. William A. Murphy,
'30, defeated Frederick C. Wilman,
'30, for Literary vice-president by
435 to 214; Manyard B. Scover, '30,
was elected to the Dental post over
Charles Waldo, '30, by 30 to 25;
Charles R. Waddell, '30, will be En-
gineering vice-president, having
138 votes to his opponent's (Charles
R. Wood), 84; the Medical office was
won by Walter Scott, '30,.who had
97 votes to James H. Allen's 39 and
Robert Bartlett's 33; 71 votes were
cast for Manley K. Hunt, '30, who
will be the Law vice-president, and
John M. Felton, '30, was chosen
combined vice-president by 23 votes
to George H. Tidwell's 8.
Lloyd has been active in the
Union management for more than
two years. He was a member of
the reception committee in 1927-28,
and directed the Fathers and Sons
banquet last year. During the past
year, he was chairman of the pub-
licity committee and held a posi-
tion on the Executive council.

in te race by a
I ig majority, was
(By Associated Press) i opposed by Rus-
CLEVELAND, May 15.-Poison gas sell Sanderson.
and two explosions which followed
the burning of X-ray films in the Above are pictured the four suc-
Cleveland Clinic today claimed cessful candidates in the field of
nearly 100 lives, campus politics for thepresidency
Tonight there were 95 knownoftmpuplagsthenpresiny
dead and hospital authorities of the four large st insu-
worked desperately to administer tions in the University. All men
artificial respiration to 43 more who won their election by an over-
were overcome. The victims of the whelming majority, Reif carrying a
disaster were dying at short inter- margin of 329 over his nearest com-
vals and physicians sent out ap- petitor.
peals for additional oxygen in the
fear that the supply in the city Results Of All
might prove insufficient. OxygenR
is declared the only effective means !

Culminating the University Mu- decisions will be printed in the!
sical society's activities for a period final issue of the Inlander, and
of 50 years, the 36th annual May will be judged by Robert Frost, na-
Festival will be presented in six tionally renowned poet, for the
concerts over a period of four days, prizes.*
beginning Wednesday, May 22. The
concerts will be given in Hill au-
ditorium. The artists that have
been engaged, and the programs
as planned are worthy in every re-
spect of the semi-centennial which
they mark. ff
The first concert will be present-
ed Wednesday evening, May 22, FVhS NORSN
contralto, and Richard Crooks, ten- -
or, and the Chicago Symphony or-
chestra under the direction of Men's Glee. Club And Varsity Band
Frederick Stock. Miss Braslau and To Assist In Program Scheduled'
Crooks will sing arias on the For Wednesday Night
Wednesday evening program.
Oratorios Thursday NARRISON WILL DIRECT
Jeannette Vreeland, soprano, and -S.
Lawrence Tibbett, baritone, the Plans for the annual senior sing,
University Choral union and the to be held on next Wednesday,
Chicago Symphony orchestra with
Earl V. Moore of the Music schoof! May 22, are now practically com
as conductor and Palmer Christian plete, it was announced yesterday
the University organist assisting, by Herbert Palmer, '29, chairman
will present two oratorios as the of the senior sing committee.
second of the concerts Thursday A large pavilion has been erected
evening. for the use of the Varsity band,
The third concert will be given
Friday afternoon with Barre Hill, which will furnish accompaniment
baritone, and Efrem Zimbalist, to the singers. The Men's Univer-
violinist as the soloists. The Chil- sity Glee club will lead the chor-;
'iren's Festival chorus with orches- isters, and Theodore Harrison, of
tral accompaniment, and Frederick the School of music, will probably
Stock and Juva Higbee as conduc- be n hand to act as directo', it
tors are also included in the pro- e o t
:ram. was further reported.I
Edith Mason To Sing Seniors will begin to gather on
Friday evening the fourth of the ;the Diagonal shortly after dinner,R
concerts will be given by Edith it is expected, and informally oldI
Mason, soprano, and a member of pcten nd informally hld
the Chicago Civic Opera company,i the first annual reunion of the class
the Chicago Symphony orchestra, of 1929. Members of the band will
and the University Choral union begin early to find their places in
with Fredrick Stock as conductor. the bandstand, and promptly at
The last two concerts are sched- 7:30 the music will begin.
uefor Saturday aernon an Not only the traditional Univer-
evening. Joseph Hofmann, pianist, iysn,.suha"Ylo ad
and the Chicago Symphony orches- sity songs, such as "Yellow and
tra with Fredrick Stock as conduc- Blue," "Varsity," "Victors,' and
tor will present the afternoon pro- "College Days" will be on the pro-
gram. Iraim but also lighter songs of a

'iation. Both won decisively.

1-Campus

i
f1

Drawing the largest vote of any council candidate in the
election yesterday, Leo T. Norville, '30, was chosen as one of the
three senior representatives. Victors with him were Stanley Coch-
Oran, '30E, and Donald J. Kline,
30. All three went into office
by large majorities, gathering
879, 860, and 834 votes, respectively,
whereas the count for their oppo-
nents was: John F. Rice, 463;
Earl A. Kloster, '30, 592, and Alex-
ander Gage, '30, 429.
Balloting on the junior represen-
tatives to the council proved deci-
New Theatre In Women's League Is sive victories for Bruce Palmer, '31,
Named For Mother Of Donor Jerrold W. Curry, '31, and Matthew
To League Fund C. Haddon, '31. Palmer led all his
'rivals in this race, with a count of
OPENS FOUR NIGHT RUN 787, while Curry and Haddon polled
719 nuA Ao v...,+..espec.. vy.. DC..r-

Vote

of overcoming the gas fumes. Candidates Lit Eng.
Killed by Gas Fumes STUDENT COUNCIL
Nearly all the deaths were attrib- Reif ...:.........451 154
uted to the deadly gas which fil- Simons ...........264 63
tered through the four-story brick McBride ..........148 44
building slowly at first and then.! SENIOR REPRESENTATIVE
augmented by a second and greater Kline . . ......... . .500 1 52
explosion than the first, rushed up
fromNorville....... ,.. 510 156
from the basement and cut off'Cochran.193
escape down the stairways and ele- Cochr38 193
vators. Klostcr ......2....383 991
Survivors said those asphyxiated Rgice..............281 6
weie -dead, their faces turning a
sickly yellowish brown color within JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVE
two minutes after inhaling the gas. Palmer ...........467 138
The fumes were given off by fire Curry............403 130
of undetermined origin which de- Haddon ...........385 154
stroyed X-ray films in the base- Ryerson ..........314 80,
ment. Some pharmacists said it Beebe .............305 125
was bromine gas, while Dr. William Baldwin ..........281 68,
E. Lower, one of the foundeUEEs of I
the clinic, said it resembled a' UNION PRESIDENT
deadly phosgene gas employed in iLloyd...........490 1 3
the World War. I Wilcox -......... -371 91
Despite the heavy loss of life, fire- UNION SECRETARY
men estimated the property da-Thayer..........440 127
age at only $50,000.y............07 12'7
Attracts Curious Crowd McCoy.337 116
Curious throngs tonight milled
about the Clinic, but they were only LITERARY VICE-PRESIDENI
curious. The real scene of the trag- Tot
edy had shifted to the county Murphy ......................43
iorgue, a sombre two story build- Widman ...............21
ing facing on Lake Eric in another ENGINEERING VICE-FEES.
part of the town. There, shortly Wood............. ......
before the dinner hour, 84 bodies, Waddell.13
laid out in threes and fours,.
awaited identification. Both floors MEDICAL VICE-PRESIDENT
of the structure were utilized for Bartlett ...................3
the task. Scott .......... ..............
At length the morgue attendants Allen ......................... 3
had done their work, and lines
formed for admittance into the LAW VICE-PRESIDENT
building. Hunt ...................... 7
Attempts Made at Identification DENTAL VICE-PRESIDENT
In groups of fle or six they went Waldo 2
in, flanked on either side by police- Stover...................
men. The grim business of identi- ...................
fint~in tc3a mn11 nati 'mona cir- I Rvv"tVfivPflv~r vvP'

Law
28
30
21
i3 3
38
33
30
27
20
23
22
21
,22
33
22
33
41
30
31

Mcd, Dent. Arch.

89
31
45
105
122
i14
23
48
31
110
113
94
42
38
36
112
37
97
53

]3
8
34
25
31
33
38
26
13
21
28
23
20
21
14
39
15
24
27

16
26
4
19
22
24
21
25
20
23
20
21
16
19
27

Tot.
751
422
296
834
879
860
592
463
429
787
716
698
494
541
448

7 -- 16 and 698 votes respectively. De-
Presenting the first p'roduction feated candidates were Francis H.
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Beebe, '31, Thomas Baldwin, '31,
Play Production last night started and George Ryerson, 31
a four night run of the "Beggar On Drake Wins Easily
.I iththe largest margin of any
Horseback." race in the entire election Ormand
. It was announced late last night J. Drake, '30, was elected president
by Mrs. W. D. Henderson, executive of the Oratorical association. He
secretary of the alumnae council, drew 1,073 votes against 397 for
that the official title of the Wom-1Russell M. Sanderson, '30. Gaining
thathehe of-preaidencyeofftheeassocia-
en's League theatre is to be the tion,ce-preside nartg 31, with a
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. It is i count of 977 more than doubled the
named as a memorial to the mother 'vote of his opponent, Howard Si-
of Gordon Mendelssohn of Bir- mon, '30, who collected 369 votes.
mingham, Michigan, who gave aIThe only women position on the
large sum to the League fund. ballot, the secretaryship, went to
The George Kaufman and Marc Lois Webb, with a vote of 847, as
Connelly farcical comedy is the first against 511 for Dorothy Miller.
public performance Play Produc- Equally decisive was the vote on
tion has given during the current the office of treasurer, which elect-
season, and the proceeds will be ed Irving Cooper, '31, over John S.
used to further the policy of free Langen, by a margin of 882 to 463.
laboratory private performances The closest vote in the election
next year according to Valentine occurred in the fight for positions
B. Windt, director. to the Board in Control of Publica-
Seats are still available for the tins, in which Joseph Howell, '30,
remaining three performances and won by 10 votes over Thomas Tho-
may be reserved by calling the .boxmas, '29. The other two elected to
office of the Lydia Mendelssohn this board were George S. Bradley
Theatre. They are priced at 75 who lead in the race, with 596, and
cents. IFrederick G. Bauschard, who polled
a vote of 556. Howell's total was
Graf Zeppelin Ready 517. Next in the rear to Thomas
was Stanton W. Todd, '30, with 415.
For Trip To America Other defeated candidates were
Lawrence R. Klein, '30, Charles
FRIEDRICHSHAFEN, Germany, Roth, '30, Robert Brown, '30, Don-
May 15.-(P')-The German dirigible ald Kline, '30.
Graf Zeppelin had a clear road Webster And Taylor Win
ready across the skies of France ! Winning by almost a 5 to 2 mar-
as she lay in her hangar tonight gin John E. Webster, '30, was named
waiting for the "zero" hour on her president of the Student Christian
second trip over the Atlantic to association. Going into office with
America. him as vice-president was Laverne
The hour of departure was ex- Taylor, '30, Webster polled 1,010 and
pected to be between 6 a. m. and Taylor 1,021 votes. They won over
6:30 a. m. Central European Time Julius A. Zink, '30, and John M.
(between midnight and 12:30 a. m. Brumm, '31, who collected 424 and
Eastern Standard Time.) 368 votes, respectively.
Dr. Hugo Eckener tonight request- Jack Wheeler, '31, was elected to
ed passengers to be ready to enter a student position on the Board in
the gondola at 5:30 a. m. Control of Athletics. He drew a
vote of 1,018, aaginst 403 for his
tage Semi-Annual Riot; lone opponent,. Robert J. Patton,
'31. Wheeler's victory was by one
Quell Student Uprising of the largest margins of any of
the races ink the election.
. ctrtiv rl - Stn t~nttr{- '1tarr~litc of th .

22 859
27 582

Three Act Opera Saturday
The three act opera "Samson and
Delilah" will complete the series
Saturday night. Marion Telva, con-
tralto, Paul Althouse, tenor, Rich-
ard Bonelli, baritone, and Williamj
Gustafson, bass, singing the parts.
Orchestral accompaniment will be'
given by the Chicago Symphony
orchestra and the University
Choral union with Earl V. Moore
directing.
Season tickets for the Festival'
are priced at six, seven, and eight
dollars and some reduction is made1
if Festival coupons are returned
with the application for seats.
Tickets may still be secured at the
School of Music on Maynard street,
and many good seats in the au-
ditorium are available.
Iowa Downs Chicago
In One Sided Contest

more popular and comical nature
such as are sung at the dinner
tables of fraternity and sorority
houses, officials promise.
While the affair is intended pri-
marily for seniors, there will be no
particular objection to juniors
and lower classmen joining in the
choruses, it was indicated. Last'
year several pots were reported to
have been seen sprinkled among
the caps and gowns, but since Cap
Night is to be held Friday night
there will be no possibility of fresh-
men being thus detected next
Wednesday.
Officials promise a pleasant time
to all comers, singers or otherwise,
and it is expected that a large
crowd will be on hand.
Pena Undergraduates S
Police Are Called To

24
22

742
586

T
tals Langen
5 Cooper
14

Treasurer

.463
.882

Secretary

94
8
97
39
71
25
30
ri

Miller.511
Webb .... . .... 847
S8C. A.
President
Webster . ........... . .1010
IZink .............. . 424

CHICAGO, May 15.---P)-Iowa "Examination period neurosis" is;
bounced into second place in the diagnosis given for student.
the Big Ten standing today bUI
trouncing Chicago, 8 to 1, behind riots held at the University of
Forest Twogood's excellent pitch- Pennsylvania at least twice each
ing. year, according to one of the force
of'veteran policemen who are call-
FRESHMEN! I ed out periodically in an effort to
. quell the disturbances.

Vice-President
Taylor . ....... .
Brumm . ..... .. .
PUBLICATIONS
Todd ....... . ... ... .
Bauschar .......... . -

1021
368
415
556

survived thee rough hand ing oI Te
over-wrought students. The ex-
plosion of the caps, the honking
of horns and the yells of the in-
stigators raised a terrific din that
was not squelched until the police
arrived; at which the students fled
to the campus and closed the gates
behind them Only one was arrest-
ed.
Last year's riot was slightly more
LRIi-I1>.qia.Q tie' At- fi-.tf Hrip +hp

O ttrW ea" he: 'an

Will the few frosh who have
any class spirit left rally round
in- fyrnf gd'of ieh T Union a hnut

Last Tuesday night the annual
I May riot took place with plenty of
nnrc~~pr~ i~q n en inn - hnf. nn flari,21

ii

I I

I

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