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May 15, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WnDWnS~A~, MAY 15, 1

T R h "

SCIENCE FELLOWSHIPS'

ARE GIVfN FOR WORK

DAILY REPRINTS OFFICIAL BALLOT
TO BE USED IN TODAY'S ELECTION,
Below is a copy of the official ballot which will be used in today's
All-Campus elections. According to the Student Council committee,

_ _.. _ _.____ n .._ _.. _ _. __.___ .. ._.

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IN PHYSICSRESEARCH
AWARDS TO CONTINUE WORK
RECEIVED BY STUDENT
AND INSTRUCTOR
WORK AND NEILSEN CITED
Scholarships Allow Further Study
At University Of Copenhagen
And Princeton
Harold H. Nielson, '26, graduate
student in Physics, and Hugh Wolf,
instructor in physics, have received

Thin'
St eel Structure
to, cut the wind

....."'.
JTUDENU

notices of their appointments to
Fellowships for next year, it was
announced yesterday.
Nielson, who will receive his Ph.D.
degree this June, has been awardedj
an American Scandinavian Foun-
dation fellowship. He will leave in
August for Denmark where he will
spend the year studying theoretical
physics at the University of Copen-t
hagen with Professor Niels Bohr,
Nobel prize winner in physics, and
Professor Oskar Klein, former mem-
ber of the physics department at
the University.
The purpose of the Foundation is
to promote a better mutual under-
standing between the United States
and theScandinavianucountries.!
Each year about 20 students, in-'I
cluding Americans, who plan to
study in one of the Scandinavian
countries, and Scandinavians who
wish to attend institutions in this
country are given the opportunity
of taking advantage of this fellow-
ship. This year seven were ap-
pointed from the United States.
Wolf, whose appointment comes
from the National Research fellow-
ship in physics, expects to enter
Harvard or Princeton next fall to
continue his studies. The National
Research council annually awards
75 fellowships in physics, mathe-
matics, and chemistry. The coun-
cil is assisted by the Rockefeller
foundation.
Dr. J. E. Mack, Princeton, and Dr.
W. H. Bennet, California Institute
of Technology, are two graduates
of the University of Michigan who
are taking advantage of these fel- .
lowships.

the names will not appear in exact ly the above order. The Daily has
printed them in theorder that the names were written on the lists
submitted by the various organiza tions. . However, The Daily ballotI
includes all of the candidates and a11 of the offices.
OFFICIAL BALLOT
All-Campus Election, Wednesday, May 15
INSTRUCTIONS:--Place a cross in the square ( ) before
the name of the candidate for whom you wish to vote.
Student Council Michigan Union
(All Men Vote) (Al Men Vote)
PRESIDENT PRESIDENTI
(Vote for One) (Vote for One)
I ] GEORGE SIMONS [ ] JACKSON A. WILCOX
[ I JENNINGS MCBRIDE I[ KENNETH M. LLOYD
[ ] ERNEST C. REIF
RECORDING SECRETARY

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PEED i the keynote of the modern game. The Dayton
Steel Racquet is the fastest in the world. Thin steel strings
in a thin steel frame give it 43( less air resistance and greater
strength than any standard wood-ind-gut racqitet.
That's why a Dayton-driven ball gets over 20% faster.
That's why the Dayton gives yqu the jump on speedier players.
You've a right 1o demand facts. Here's the third question
of a series.:
Q. How do thinner steel strings affect the life of the ball
A. In any case more thAin 90% of the wear on a tennis bal
is caused by abrasion of the gritty court, not by the racquet.
The most delicate laboratory scales revealed no difference what=
ever in the ainountt of cover removed front t wo identical sets of
balls given the sane iuimbher of chop strokes, one set with a
gut, one with a Day Ton Steel Rzcqtuet. Davton Steel Itacquet
Company, Dayton, Ohio.
~~0
DLAYiTON STEE RACQUET
w:i M(O DE R N AS AVIATION

EXPERT TYPING
Will add to the good appearance of your
report or thesis. Prompt Service
1111 South University / Block from Campus
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily
Quality - Service - Satisfaction
The three aims of the Lincoln Res-
taurant backed up by our years of
experience in catering to the stu-
dents and townspeople
7ie Lincoln estaurants
E. Huron Packard State
and and and
4th Ave. State Liberty
jr
CORNWELL COAL - COKE
Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coal
Solvay and Gas Coke
This business has been growing ever
since it was established. The secret---
"giving absolute satisfaction to our
customers." We believe it pays to do
business in a friendly way. If you
think so too, let's get together.
E CORNWELL COAL - COKE
OFFICE, CORNWELL BLOCK
Phones, Office : 451-4552 Yard Office :5152
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SENIOR REPRESENTATIVE

(Vote for Three)

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STANLEY COCHRAN
LEO T. NORVILLE,
DONALD J. KLINE
JOHN F. RICE
EARL A. KLOSTER
ALEXANDER GAGE

JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)

1
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THOMAS BALDWIN
FRANCIS H. BEEBE
GEORGE RYERSON
JERROLD W. CURRY
BRUCE PALMER
MATTHEW C. HADDON

(Vote for One)
f ] JAMES THAYER
[ ] ROBERT S. M'COY
LITERARY VICE-PRESIDENT
(Vote only for one and only in your
department)
[ ] WILLIAM MURPHY
[ J FRED WIDMAN
ENGINEERING VICE-PRES.
[ ] CHARLES WOOD
[ ] CHARLES WADDELL
MEDICAL VICE-PRES.
I ] ROBERT BARTLETT
[ ] WALTER SCOTT
[ JAMES A. ALLEN
LAW VICE-PRESIDENT
T[ A MANLY K. HUNT
IDENTAL VICE-PRESIDENT

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Read the Classif ied Ads

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RADIO
Parts and Se

EDUCA TOR ADDED
TO SPEAKER LIST
AT GENEVA MEET
Dr. Alexander Meiklejohn, found-
er of the experimental college at-
the University of Wisconsin, is the
latest addition to a growing roll of
nationally known authorities on the
curriculum of the 1929 session on
the State Campus at Geneva be-
twen June 12 and 20.
Dr. Meiklejohn will speak at
Geneva on the evening of June 13
on some phase of the educational
philosophy in which he believes and
which finds its expression in the
unique experiment in education
which' he is now supervising on the
Universtiy of Wisconsin campus.
Interviewers have found that Dr.
Meiklejohn's method of conducting
a college with his group of men is
very unique. There are no rules.
Assignments are posted wekly; men
confer with advisers at scheduled:
times; there are weekly lectures by
professors in the college or by au-{
thorities from the outside early in
the week..
Grades are not known. Instead
of declaring his men eligible or in-
eligible for student activities, Dr.
Meiklejohn demands that the stu-
dent evaluate both class room and
extra-curicular work of the college
and place his emphasis according,
to his own opinion. When asked if
the college is a success he invariab-1
ly replies "we do not know; the
experiment is not completed.''
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-
Three Greek letter fraternities on
the University of Minnesota cam-
pus have recently made moves to
make "hell week" less severe, one
fraternity ,even abolishing the cus-
tom.

Student Christian
Association
(Entire Campus Vote).
PRESIDENT
JULIUS A. ZINK
JOHN E. WEBSTER
VICE-PRESIDENT-..
LAVERNE TAYLOR
JOHN M. BRUMM

rvice

FOR ALL MAKES
GEO. WEDEMEYER

[ I

CHARLES WALDO
MAYNARD STOVER

221 E. Liberty

"EXCLUSIVELY RADIO

Phone 3694

a

[
[c

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COMBINED VICE-PRESIDENT
[ 1 J. MARK FELTON
[ ] GEORGE H. TIDSWELL
Board In Control Of
Student Publications

[
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71

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Oratorical Association

(Entire Campus Vote)
PRESIDENT
ORMAND DRAKE
RUSSELL M. SANDERSON

[

]
I

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I..
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(Entire Campus Vote)
(Vote for Three)
LAWRENCE KLEIN
STANTON TODD
ROBERT BROWN
CHARLES ROTH
FRED BAUSCHARD
THOMAS THOMAS
J OSEPI H WELL
GEORGE BRADLEY

V

VICE-PRESIDENT

[
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LAWRENCE HARTWIG
HOWARD SIMON

Our Dissolution of Partnership Sale
Gives You Unusual Shoe Values
On New Spring Styles for Men and Women
EVERY PAIR OF SHOES MUST BE TURNED INTO CASH

, TREASURER

[
[

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]

JOHN Q. LANGEN
IRVING COOPER

Board In Control
Of Athletics
(Entire Campus Vote)
(Vote for One)

SECRETARY

1

DOROTHY MILLER
LOIS WEBB

If
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JACK WHEELER
ROBERT J. PATTON

Men's Florsheim Shoes Now $8.70
"Best $10 Shoe Made"

Ladies' High Grade
Dress and Sport Oxfords

"First Electrical Shop
in Ann Arbor
Still in Business"
Get Our Priceh
Lamps--Shades
For Any Room
C. H KITTR E E
ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTOR

.
t
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V_
4a

BLUE
LANTERNo
Ballroom
ISLAND LAKE
NOW OPEN Dancing
Nightly
TL'T N A A V'V)

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All $10.00 Florsheim Sport
Oxfords, all the new combina-
tions, leather or rubber soles.
Now
$8.70
One big lot of $10.00 Packard
Imported Scotch Grain Ox-
lords, black or tan, to be
closed out at
$7.90
Another big lot of $8.50 and
$9 Packard oxfords, new styles
in Scotch grain and smooth
leathers, broad and medium
toes, choice
$6.90

of $7.00 sport oxfords;
styles just in; choice

new

Over 100 Pairs

The $7 and $7.50 styles go at
$5.90. This lot comprises a
variety of styles and leathers,
white, black and white, all
tan or two-tone tan; rubber
sole and heels. These will

$5.45
All broken lots of men's $7,
$8 and $9 oxfords, all group-
ed together at one price.
Sizes limited. Choice
$4.90
300 pairs of $8.50 and $9
new sport oxfords, 7 different
patterns; leather or rubber
soles, choice
,$6.90

go at

$5.90

Here Is A Bargain
One big section of $7 and $8
pumps and oxfords, mighty
good styles. They will sure
go fast at
$3.90
About 150 pairs of Selz fine
dress pumps and oxfords in a
variety of styles and pat-
terns. Every pair well worth
$8, to close at
$4.90

Eight new styles of women's
fine .kid pumps, all $8.50 and
$9 =values in black, red, blue,
and beige, choice
$6.90
The $8.50 styles will go at
$6.75. These are in all white,
Elk,. black and white Elk, all
white calf with heel, dark
brown Elk with crepe sole,
two-tone tan with rubber sole
andaseveral other styles, all
go at
$6.75
Six new stunning spring styles
of modern miss pumps, new-
est shades and leathers, just
received. Every pair worth
$7.50 to $8; choice
$6.45

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