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May 12, 1929 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-12

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ESTABLISHED
1890

I r

AiW#

Da ti

S MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRES

Vol. XXXIX, No. 164 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 12, 1929

EIGHT PAGES

,. _

TRACKMEN DEFEAT
GOPHERS, 82-53;E[I~l

WOLVERINES PLACE MEN
EVERY EVENT TO TAKE
SECOND DUAL MEET

IN

OTTERNESS HINlH SCORER

Brooks Hurls Discus '447
For First Place; Ketz
W Tins Two Events

Feet

(Special To The Daily)
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., May 11.-
Michigan's undefeated track team
triumphed today at the expense of
the Gophers by a score of 82 to 53
in a meet featured by several thril-
ling races and good marks in all
events. Scoring nine first places as
against five for the Gophers and
dividing first honors in the high
jump, the Wolverines were at no
time in serious danger of being
outpointed by the local team.
Otterness was the high point man
of the day with 13 markers, while
Ketz wassecond with 10.kThe ver-
satile Gopher tied with his team
mate Hess in the pole vault, won
the high hurdles, and tied with
Felker of Michigan in the high
jump. Ketz won the hammer and
the javelin.
Hess and Otterness tied at 13 feet
2 inches to win the pole vault and
on a try for a record Hess barely
inissed 13 feet 6 inches. Otterness
took a nasty fall on his try when
his pole broke.
Grodsky Takes Dash
Grodsky and Tolan o Micnlgan
and Rhea of Minnesota, finished
the hundred in that order in 10
seconds flat. Tolan allowed his
team mate to win as he took sec-
ond looking back over his shoulders.
In the 220 yard event, Tolan easily
took first from Rhea and Grodsky
in 22.4 seconds.
The mile run furnished one of
he th rillo of the -afternoon when
Strain, Minnesota, finished two
yards ahead of Monroe after
stirring last lap fighting.
Another thriller was the quarter
mile in which the Seymour Twins
cooperated nicely to beat Catlin,
the Gopher ace. The brothers ran
a heady race and kept Catlin on
the outside most of the way. Com-
ing down the home stretch the I
three were even but Dale Seymour
pulled out in front to nose out Cat-
lin. Dalton Seymour was a close
third. Time 51 seconds.
Ketz came through with his sec-
ond win of the day when he beat
Otterness in the javelin with a
heave of 170 feet.
Summaries
Hammed throw.-Won by Ketz,
(Mich.); McArthur, (Mich.), sec-
ond; Williams, (Mich.), third. Dis-
tance-159 feet, 9 inches.
Pole vault.---Otterness and Hess, I
(Minn.), tied for first; Erickson
and McLellen, (Mich.), tied for
third. Height-13 feet, 2 inches.
100 yard dash.-Won by Grodsky,
(Mich.); Tolan, (Mich.), second;
Rhea, (Minn.), third. Time-10
seconds flat.
Shot put - Won by I Poorman,
(Mich.); Brooks, (Mich.), second;
Johnson, (Minn.), third. Distance
-43 feet, 6 inches.
Mile run.-Won by Strain,
(Minn.);;;; Monroe, (Mich.), sec-
ond Fawcett, (Minn.), third. Time
-4 minutes, 30 6-10 seconds.
220 yard dash.-Won by Tolan,
(Mich.); Rhea, (Minn.), second;
Grodsky, (Mich.), third. Time-22
4-10 seconds.
120 yard hurdles.-Won by Otter-
ness, (Minn.) ; Potter, (Mich.), sec-
ond; Pipgras, (Minn.), third. Time
-1 2-10 seconds.
Discus throw.-Won by Brooks,
(Mich.); Sanderson, (Mich.), sec-
ond; Johnson, (Minn.), third. Dis-
tance-147 feet, 8 inches.
High jump.-Otterness, (Minn.);'
and Felker, (Mich.), tied for first;
Rhea, (Minn.), third. Height 5
feet, 10' 2 inches.,
440 yard dash.-Won by Dale
Seymour, (Mich.); Catlin, (Minn.),
second; Dalton Seymour, (Mich.),
third. Time-51 seconds flat.
Two mile run.-Won by Ander-
son, (Minn.); Austin, (Mich.), sec-
ond; Fornell, (Minn.), third. Time
-9 minutes, 43 3-10 seconds.
Javelin throw.-Won by Ketz,
Mich.); Otterness, (Minn.), sec-
ond; Brubaker, (Mich.), third. Dis-

tance 170 feet.
Broad jump.-p-Won by Catlin,

CALDWELL URGES
RULES FOR RADIO
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 11.-Radio
communications with foreign coun-
tries and within this country now
trend toward monopoly which calls
for rigid regulations, Louis G. Cald-
well, former counsel for the radio
commission, today told the Senate
Interstate Commerce commission.
Caldwell testified at the hearing
of the committee conducted on the
bill of Senator Couzens designed to
regulate radio, telegraph, telephone,
and cables in interstate transmis-
sion through a federal communica-
tions commission
The monopoly, Caldwell declared,
did not include the field of broad-
casting, where he said that the
;hains are merely killing their pro-
grams.
.'I regard radio," he said, "as one
of our most valuable natural re-
sources, and without rigid regula-
tion there will be no anarchy."
FRESHMEN ANNEX
SECONDVICTORY
Cane-Spree Results In Draw, While
New Men Triumph In Rope- Ty-
ing And Lose One Event.
CLASS LOSES ALL GAMES
Roping and imprisoning practic-
ally all members of the sophomore
class who had turned out for the
final half of the traditional under-
class games, yesterday morning at
South Ferry field the class of '32
captured the final event and the
necessary two points for their sec-
ond victory over the sophomores.
Preceding encounters in the spring
games had.been halfed by the riv-
al classes, but the rope tieing con-
test gave the freshmen a 4 1-2 to
2 1-2 win.
Outnumbering in large propor-
tions their immediate superiors,
the yearlings met little difficulty in
administering a decisive beating to
the sophomores. When the al-
lotted 15 minute period had ex-
pired, the class of '32 had tied and
penned some 50 sophomores, while
the second year men had but 16
opponents in their prison. The
only sophomores who escaped be-
ing roped were those who guarded
the pen.
In the other two events, the cane
spree and the obstacle race, the
sophomores secured a slight ad-
vantage, evening the points after
their defeat n the tugs-of-war on
Frday afternoon. The obstacle
race was a one point victory for
the second year class, while the
cane spree resulted in a half-point
for each of the opposing classes.
For the tugs on the preceding
afternoon, the freshmen had se-
cured two points, while the sopho-
mores were awarded one for the
winning the second of the picked
men encounter.
Northwestern Loses
Meet With Wisconsin
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, May 11.-The Univer-
sity of Wisconsin easily defeated
Northwestern 87 2-3 to 47 1-3 in a
dual track and field meet today.
The Badgers won, nine out of 15
firsts. Tom Warne, of Northwest-
ern, furnished the high spot of the
meet, scoring 13 feet, 6 inches in
the pole vault for a new Dyche

stadium record.
UNDERGRADUATES

Varsity Runner Takes
First In Century Dash;

WEUIIuEuLu IV!

uu'Iu1

PHiiRrPNF Tfl .IINi

Isadore Grodsky
Michigan's dash artist who led
Tolan, his team mate, to the tape
in the hundred yard event in the
meet with Minnesota yesterday.
The time for the event was 10
seconds flat. The condition of the
:rack was reported to be poor.
'Beggar On Horseback" Will Be
First Play With Charge
For Admission
LARGE GROUP EMPLOYED
Presenting their first public per-
formance of the, current season.
Play Production will offer George
S. Kaufman arrd Marc Connely'
hilarious comedy, "Beggar On
Horseback," for a four day run be-
ginning Wednesday of this week.
The production will be staged in
the Women's League theater.
Departing in this last cam puE
Dffering from the usual policy of
free laboratory private perform-
ances, the, proceeds from the fur
showings will be used to further
;his policy next year. Nine labora-
tory presentations have been offer-
ed to the campus gratis during
the current seasonand this policy
will be continued next year with
the money derived from these pub-
lic showings.
Thegplay employs a cast of 50.
%nd an unusually large nuniber of
ntriguing but difficult scenes are
necessary for the proper effects of
,he action. The technical staff of
?lay Production has been working
>n the construction of these setE
for several weeks, all of them be-
.ng made in the organization's
laboratory.
Ohio Beats Purdue
After Tight Contest
(By Associted Press>)
COLUMBUS, O., May 11.---Ohio
State won their third Western
Conference baseball victory here
today by defeating Purdue, 3 to 1:
in a hotly contested pitcher's duel
Hess' three-base hit, a single by
Riehl an Fessler's sacrifice in the
eighth inning brought in the two
runs that assured the Ohio victory.j
The score:

IOR CON' VOCATIN;
STEINERW ILJALK
PROFESSOR WILL DI S C U S S
MAKING OF CREATIVE
PERSONALITYj
MEETING IS EXPERIMENTAL
Norville To Preside Over Convention
Held By Student Christian
Association Today
Opening the first evening con-j
vocation of the year, Dr. Edward A.
Steiner, professor of applied Chris-
tianity at Grinnell college, will
speak at 7:45 o'clock tonight in
Hill auditorium on "The Making of
a Creative Personality."
This convocation has been ar-
anged through the cooperation of
,he Student Christian Association
and Ann Arbor churches. All of
he churches will close their doors
luring the convocation hou~r in
)rder to allow the members of
'heir congregations to attend the
Services.
The program this evening will be
presided over by Leo T. Norville, '30,
;hairman of the Speakers Commit-
tee of the S. C. A. Members of
ionor societies of the University
have consented to act as ushers.
Special music will be rendered by
the choir of the Methodist Episco-
)al church under the direction of
Mrs. Mabel Rhead.
Steiner Well-Known
Tonight will make Dr. Steiner's
fourth visit to Ann Arbor during
ais professorship at Grinnell col-
lege. He is particularly well-known
to college audiences, having ad-
dressed student gatherings in east-
ern and southern universities as-
well as in the west and middle west.
He is an authority ir'th field of
sociology and has devoted much
of his time to writing books and
articles for current magazines. His
associationwith the church dates
back to 1891 at which time he was
)rdained as a minister in the Con-
gregational church.,
Dr. Steiner is a native of Czecho-
3lovakia, but attended school in
3ermany. He received his A. B.
degree from the University of .Hei-
delberg, and later two post-grad-
uate degrees from the Universities
>f Berlin and Gettingen. He was
She special representative of the
'Outlook" in Russia during 1903,
and is the author of several books.
Among these are: "Tolstoy, the
Man," "Against the Current,"
'Sanctus Spiritus and Company,"
and "The Eternal Hunger."
Meeting Is Experiment
This evening's convocation is in
the nature of an experiment and
s the result of requests for the
bolding of such a service in the
evening instead of in the morning
3o as not to conflict with the serv-
ces of Ann Arbor churches. Until
ip to two years ago Sunday con-
vocations were held regularly in
.he evening, but because of a feel-
ng that more students would at-
xnd if theywere held to enlarge
tudent attendance at the services.
Doors of Hill auditorium will be
open this evening at 7:30 o'clock.
The service will conclude at 9
o'clock.
Notre Dame Defeats .!
Northwestern, 11-5
(By Associated Press)

SOUTH BEND, May 11.-Notre
Dame tamed Northwestern's giant
killers today, defeating them, 11 to
5, at baseball.
,Oscar Rust permitted nine scatter-
Id blows, while his Notre Dame
mates crashed out 12 hits. Oliphant,
Northwestern firsts baseman, ham-
mered a home run over the left
field fence to score Schwartz ahead
of him in the sixth inning. It was
the first time in four years that a
ball has been boosted out of the
local park.

3
f
t
c
f
3
k
t
G
yt
L
t
1
I
t
1
'

YOUNG PRESIDENT
B A CK S STUDENTS
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, May 11.-A tal, slim
young man of 30 years, with an in-
fectious eager grin, dropped into
town today to give his new job as
president of the University' of Chi-
cago the "once over."
Robert Maynard Hutchins seem-
ed entirely undismayed at having
been chosen at his age to direct the
preparatory years of thousands of
young men and women in a $75,-
000,000 institution.
Mary Pickford and Douglas Fair-
banks, neglected for once, peeped
out of their drawing room windows
as the newspaper men and photog-f
raphers surrounded the' youthful
president-elect and his wife.
"What kind of a cigaret is that
you are smoking?" was the first
question popped at him. It brought
forth the smile and an instantane-
ous reply.Y
MIMES IWTIIATES
Entertainment By Initiation Closes
Evening's Program Presented
At Mimes Theater
REUNION BANQUET GIVEN
Fifteen students were initiated
last night into Mimes, honorary
dramatic society of the Union, at
a gala reunion and banquet in the
organization's rooms atthe Union.
These men were selected for mem-
bership because of their connec-
tion with the Opera and other
Mimes activities
Entertainment in the Mimes
theater by the newly initiated
members as well as several of the
returning alumni followed the in-
stallation of the new men. Among
the prominent alumni who return-
ed for the affair were Myron
Chon, of Chicago, Burley 'y' c6'7,
Milwauee, Wap John, of Detroit,
Norman Reed, of ,Toledo, and R.
W. Fixel, of Detroit. Chon collab-
orated in writing the book, words,
and music for the opera "In and
Out" presented within recent years.
Jacobs was "leading lady" in the
second opera, "Culture," and ' all
the others played prominent parts
in former Mimes activities.
The newly initiated men in-
clude: Norman Brown, '30, William
Browne, '31, Stanley Cochran, '30E,
John Effinger, '30, Eugene Gillis,
'30, David Hempstead, '31, George
Johnson, '30, Fritz Kleene, '31,
George Priehs, '30, William Reed,
'30, Pierce Rosenberg, '30, Arthur
Smith, '30, Sidney Straight, Spec.,
David Ward, '31, and Kenneth
White, '29.
- D
I DAILY TRYOUTS I
Offering the last opportunity I
of the present year for tryouts
on The Daily editorial staff, I
arrangements have been made to I
allow all second semester fresh- I
men and any others who may 8o
desire to register with the News I
Editor any afternoon this week
at The Daily editorial office, in I
the Press building.i
Both those who wish to begin I
work and those who will start I
in the fall may sign up now for I
writing of any kind used on The I
I Daily.
I D -------

M 'AFEELEADS WRALTEAM'
TO EASY 5 1 VICTORY OVER iLLINOIS
AND KEEPS SEASON'S RECORD CLEAN.
INDIANS LIMITED TO FOUR HITS WHILE
WOLVES SECURE EIGHT SAFETIES
OFF ANDREWS' DELIVERY
By Ednard L. Warner
Masterful pitching by Bill McAfee gave Michigan a 5,1 vic-
tory over Illinois yesterday afternoon on Ferry Field as the Wol-
verines retained their position as leaders in the Conference diamond
race. McAfee limited the Illini to four hits, while, his mates ga-
thered eight safeties off the delivery of Capt. Don Andrews.
- The largest crowd of the season, approximating 5,000 people
watched Coach Fisher's team win its second Big Ten victory of
the season. Threatening storm clouds failed to keep down the
attendance.
McAfee was in rare form today as he tamed the Illini, re-
tiring eighlt of the opposition by tfie strike-out route. But for an
error by Kubicek in the fourth inning, the Wolverine. mound ace

might have
more than

scored a shut-out. This was the only inning in which
four batters faced him. Michigan's batting power,
Prather latent in recent games,

WILL SPEAK HERE
.Eminent Philologist Will Talk On
Relation Of Languages And
History Temorrow.'
LECTURE TO BE IN FRENCH
How the history of civilization
is dependant on the development,
of language will be discussed by
Prof. Wilhelm Meyer-Luebke at
4:15 o'clock tomo. row afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium, it was
annouhced yestbIrday at headquatt'
ers of the department of Romance
languages.
Professor Meyer-Luebke, who in
the opinion of Prof. Hugo P.
Thieme, of the Romance languages
department, is the most eminent
living Romance philologist, is at
present making a brief tour of the
United States. The University is
one of four in the entire country
which he has chosen to visit, it
was announced.. The other uni-
versities to be similarly honored
are Northwestern, Chicago and
Minnesota.
His lecture will be delivered in
French, according to Professor
Thieme. He is willing to speak
either French or German, but it l
was thought that there are more
students on the campus who un-,
derstand French than who under-
stand German.
Professor Meyer-Luebke was born
in Switzerland. He has been pro-
fessor of Romance languages in
the universities of Zurich, Jena,
Bonn, and Vienna, where he now
is. He has been Rector of the
latter institution.
Aside from many published arti-
cles, he is the author of many
monumental works, including an
Italian grammar, a French histori-
cal grammar, 'and "Introduction to'
the Science of Romance Linguis-1
tics," the four volume "Grammar
of the Romance Languages," and
'the "Etymological Dictionary of the
Romance languages.""'

came to light today as the- Wol-
verines scored five runs on eight
hits, three walks and ran errvr.
Ernie McCoy led his mates with the
stick, getting a pair of singles,
while Corridon and McAfee were
the only Michigan men who failed
to hit safely.
The Wolverines went into a one-
run lead in the first inning. After
Nebelung and Corrid anr grounded
out, Straub singled past second and
then stole second. Kubicek then
scored Straub from the keystone
sack by singling past first.
Illinois Stages Come-Back
Illinois came back to tie the
count in the fourth frame. Walk-
er walked and went to third when
Kubicek muffed up O'Grad y's
grounder.' Brown then singled to
center, scoring. Walker. Williams
forced O'Grady at third, McAfee
to Winetraub. Brown and Wil-
liams then Worked a double steal.
Yule flied to Walker, and the Illini
runners were left stranded when
Weintraub made a great stop and
throw of Snyder's grounder, going
way in to take the ball,
Again Michigan came back to
score after two men were retired
With Straub and Kubicek- already
out in the fourth, Weintraub sin-
gled to center. McCoy scratched
a single off Brown's glove sending
Weintraub to third. When McCoy
drew Synder's throw to second,
Weintraub scored from third.
Myron ended the inning by strik-.
ing out.
Michigan Has Good Inning
Michigan came to life again in
the seventh to send three runs
across the plate and make sure of
victory. Myron led off with a hard
triple along the left field foul line,
and scored a moment later when
Truskowski doubled to right cen-
ter. McAfee sacrificed Truskow-
ski to third, and then Nebelung
walked.
Truskowski scored and' Nebe-
lung went to second when Andrews
committed a balk. Corriden flied
out, but Straub reached second
and Nebelung scored when 'Yule
threw low to first on ' the Mich -
gan right fielder's grounder.
BOX SCORE

R H
Purdue ... .010 000 000---1 7
Ohio State ...010 000 02x-3 8

E
1
1

HUGE CROWD ATTENDS BANQUET
AT UNION FOR FATHERS AND

i
1
r

SONS

ILLINOIS AB
Lymp'lous, 3b. .... 4
Witte, cf....... 4
Walker, i'f. ......3
O'Grady, If....... 3
Brown, 2b. ........4
Williams, lb......4
Yule, ss. ......... 3
Snyder, c........2
Andrews, p......2

R
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
Q

DRIVE BOARD

H PO A
1 1 3
1 30
2 0 1
0 14 0
0 4 0 1
0 1 5
4 24 1

TO CLOSETS WITH ROTTEN EGGS1

(By Associated Press)
DES MOINES, Iowa, May 11.-
A student uprising broke out at
the Des Moines University tonight.
disrupting the closing session of the
board of trustee. School has been
ordered closed.
.One hundred and fifty under-
graduates surrounded the adminis-
tration building and threw eggs.
and stones as the board members'
retired to nearby closets. The stu-
dents were protesting, it is under-
stood, the ousting by the trustees
today of the entire faculty, includ-
ing Dr. Harry Wayman, president.
A police riot call was turned in,
and nffiet jwre sent to the cam-

Yesterday the board was called
'o consider requesting the resigna-
tions of Dr. T. T. Shields and Mis'
Edith Rebman, as members of the
board. The meeting was said to
have been instigated by; Dr. Way-
man, who previously had refused
to follow suggestions of Dr. Shield:
that seven members of the univer-
sity faculty be discharged.
Dr. Shields was said to have held
that Dean A. E. Bennett of the
college pf education and Professor
E. L. Grimes were guilty of indis-
creet modernistic utterances. The
board today, however, instead of
requesting the resignations of Miss
Rebman and Dr. Shields, vindicat-
ed them and ousted Dr. Wavnan

"Too many sons do not get to
understand their fathers until they
are well along in life, and many
never throughly understand them,"
Jude William L. Day, 'OOL, in ad-
dressing more than 500 fathers1
and sons at the banquet last night
in observance of the Union's sev-
enth annual Father and Son
week-end. "A real understanding
is not obtained by the father treat-
ing the son as a baby, nor by the
son feeling that his father is some
strange person who could not pos-
sibly understand him,' he contin-
ued.
"Humanity never hanced anyone,"
said Judge Day. "People who come
to Michigan are human; they are
not the socially ambitious who ship
their sons off to some Eastern
school, but they send them to Mich-

athletic plants need the assistance
of parents who will provide leader-
ship for the young people of the
nation.
"The question before the country
today should be not 'Where is
youth going?' but 'Where are men
and women leading them by ex-
ample?' Yost declared.
"How far one gets in the world
depends greatly on the way one I
makes use of what he knows, and
how he utilizes the opportunities
which parents, university and state
are endeavoring to give him," he
concluded.
Carl Brandt of the speech de-
partment acted as toastmaster,
facetiously choosing as his subject
"Books-the Bulwarks of Educa-
tion." His most edifying statement
was the assertion that "if all the
books that were sunosed to have'

Totals . 29 1

E
0
0
,0
0
0
0
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

MICHIGAN A
Nebelung, cf .....
Corriden, lf. ......
Straub, rf. ....... .
Kubicek, 2b. .....
Weintraub, 3b. ..
McCoy, lb. ........
Myron, ss.....
Truskowski, c.
McAfee, p......
Totals'

AB
3
4
'4
4
3
3
3
4
2

1
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0

H PO
1 1
0 1.
1 1
1' 1
1.2
2 12
1 1
18
0 0.


0
0
0
0
6
1
1
1
8

SOUTH BEND ,id_ May 11.-
Two Cartier field marks fell today'
as Notre Dame defeated Michigan
State, 84 1-3 to 41 2-3, in a dual
track and field meet.

30 5 8 27 17 1

,Score by innings:
Illinois .....,... 000 100 000-1 4 1
Michigan .....100 100 30x-5 8 1
Summaries: Two base hits-

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