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May 11, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGOn TWM

THE MICHIGAN

DATUM'

SATURDAY, MAY 11, 1929

-I

_ __ _

r r

VINEEPHILOLOGIST'
TO LECTURE MONDAY
ONLNGAEHISTORY'
PROF. T HI E M E ANNOUNCES!
TALK BY MEYER-LUEBKE
IN AUDITORIUM
WILL SPEAK IN FRENCH
Authority To Also Appear At
Chicago, Northwestern
And Minnesota
Professor Wilhelm Meyer-Luebke,
who in the opinion of Prof. Hugo
P. Thieme of the Romance lan-
guages department is the most
eminent living Romance philologist,
will speak on "The History of Lan-
guage and the History of Civiliza-
tion" at 4:15 Monday afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium, it was
announced yesterday at headquar-
ters of the Romance languages de~
partment.
The University is one of four in.
the entire country which Professor
Meyer-Luebke has chosen to visit
on his present brief trip through I
the United States. The other uni-
versities to e similarly honored are
Northwestern, Chicago, and Minne-
sota.
His lecture Monday will be deliv-
ered in French, it was announced.
In it, he will explain how the his-
tory of civilization is dependent on
te development of language, it is
expected.
Professor Meyer-Luebke was born
in Switzerland. He has held chairs
of Romance languages in the uni-
versities of Zurich, Jena, Bonn, and
Vienna, where he now is. He has
-been Rector of the latter institution.
Aside from many published arti-'
oes, he is the author of many mon-
umental works, including an Ital-
ian grammar, a French historical'
grammar, an Introduction to the'
Science of Rqmance Linguistics, and
particularly the four volume Gram-
mar of the Romance Languages,
and the great Etymological Diction-
ary of thee Romance languages.
He is a member, cori'esponding
member, and honorary member of
most of the learned societies and
academies dealing with his field, in-c
cluding the Modern Language So-l
ciety of America.1
Professor Meyer-Luebke has hadt
an international reputation since'
1895, at which time his dictionary
had come to be used in all univer-
sities in which graduate work was
done in Romance languages. Dur-
ing the last semester he held the
chair of Romance languages at
Johns Hopkins university.
Ile will arrive in Ann Arbor' Sun-'
day evening with his wife and
daughter, and while here will stay
at the Union. At noon Monday, he
will be honored at a luncheon in
the Union to be given by the staff!
of the Romance languages depart-
:menit. Aside from this luncheon
and an -informal tour of the cam-
pus, no "entertainment is being
planned in his honor. He will leave
for Chicago Monday evening.
It was estimated in a recent sur-
vey that approximately 41'iper cent
of the individual wealth of the
country is controlled by women.
They are in the majority as stock-
holders in many corporations, and
there are now as many women mil-
lionaires as men.

Charles Hughes, Jr.,
To Be New Solicitor

N EW COUNTY SOCIETY Morris Characterizes Ultra-Realistic
Poetry As "Commendable But Immature"
APrruI1NTU IYMIT , II t "Commendable but immature", school arises, since writing of these
were the words in which Prof. A. R. simple facts which are felt to be so r
Morris, of the rhetoric department, valuable, they often succeed only t
Washtenaw Historical By-Laws in an interview yesterday character- in reporting and portraying, com-
Committee Chosen To Frame ized the present ultra-realistic pletely without organization or in-
C o n s t i t u t i o n movement in poetry. terpretation. This is a mistake that 1
"The whole change," said Profes- violates fundamental artistic rules, I
TO HOLD MEETING SOON sor Morris, "that these new poets I in that one feature of . aesthetic c
such as Sandberg, Amy Lowell, and endeavor is over-emphasized much'c
At a meeting of the board of Edward Cummings have inaugurat- to the detriment of other equallyv
directors of the 'newly organized ed in the poetry of America comes important characteristics, thus l
Washtenaw Historical society com- as a result of their realization of rendering the attempt a mere facile a
mittees on records and relics and the foolishness and uselessness of picture with no real significance to I
to draw up a constitution were composing sublime, melodious verse the reader or to the poet."
appointed. concerning things with which they "Of course," concluded Professorb
Mrs. Sidney Clarkson -of Ann have never had any personal con- Morris, "all our criticism should not
Arbor was appointed custodian oftact and of which they actually be unfavorable for there are many
relics to take care of the gifts of know very little. They have set points about ultra-realism that are
historical material of the county themselves to. the task of creating praiseworthy and worthwhile. A Z
which will be presented to the a poetry that deals with the ele- generation or so more of continued!
society ments of existence as they really effort in the direction of organizing
Prof. Carl E. Pray, head of th present in our lives, and they are and interpreting the material al- I r
history department of Ypsilanti trying to put these ideas and im- ready realize will make a vast dif- I
Normal. school, was appointed pressions in a form that anyone ference in the quality of verse pro-
custodian of history can appreciate. duced by this group, and we can
It was also resolved that the "Here is the point where the reasonably expect the finished pro-t
Museums building on Washtenaw major cause for condemning their duct to be of the highest type. "
avenue be used to keep the records - - - --COLUMBUS, Ohio.-An odd inci-
and gifts until a society building is Dietician Will Give dent happened some time ago when1
obtained. iFielding Yost, the famous coach at
A constitutional committee to Illustrated Lecture Michigan, dropped in at the Sigma x
draw up a constitution for the first 'Chi fraternity, of which he is a
annual June meeting of the society Lecturing on "The Scientist's member at Michigan. Upon this
was appointed by- the directors. Dr. occasionnheowashansweredibys
J. M, Osborne of Ann Arbor was View of Vegetarianism," Dr. L. H. 'freshman who seemed to have a4
made chairman. Mr. Oscar E. Eber- Newburg, of the University Hos- considerable amount of assurance
bach and Mr. W. W. Florer of Ann pital will appear in the Natural for a pledgee.j
Arbor are also on the committee. I Science Auditorium at 4:15 Thurs- "I'm Fielding Yost, the Michigan1
First president of the society is; day, May 15. coach," said the famous man by
Dr. Carl E. Guthe, director of the This lecture should prove of both way of introduction.
Museum of Anthropology. Officers interest and value above the ordi- "That so," drawled the freshman,
meeting in June. nary because it is the first public j puffing away on a cig. "Come on!
announcement of the interesting in and sit down and then I'll tell
S*T Dresearch that Dr. Newburg has been one."
Speaker To Discuss carrying on in the hospital. In ad-'
Boulder Darn- F ork Idition to its value it holds a cer- The dean of women at the Uni-j
tainamount of interest for those versity of Nebraska, is strongly ad-{
who remember Professor Muysken's vising a more complete lighting!
Prof. D. W. Mead of the Univer- statement made in The Daily some system on that campus.
sity of Wisconsin, a member of the time ago.
Boulder Dam commission, is to de- Dr. Newburg promises to refute
liver a lecture here on the Dam these statements by the results of
on the night of Thursday, May 16. the experiments he has been carry-
Professor Mead's speech is to be ing on in his work. The lecture is
given under the auspices of the to be illustrated and deserves a
civil engineering department. large attendance.

News From Other Colleges

CARLTON COLLEGE-A Ger-
man conversation class recently at-
ended a Moravian church en
masse in order to hear a real Ger-
man sermon
AMES , IOWA-Scholastic rec-
cords of the 110 members of Iowa
college varsity teams during the
winter quarter show that the ath-
etes successfully passed an aver-
age of 16.5 credit hours per man.
Only 17 men. out of the 110 failed
to pass 15 hours each. This should
be a great encouragement to other
state athletic teams.
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-
Doubtless jealous of Michigan's
unprecedented idea of holding
spring basketball practice, Illinois
has gone even further in deciding
to hold a post-season fencing ses-
sion this year. There is at present
a squad of ten men reporting for
this unusual activity according to
Coach Craig of the university.
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-
The physiological chemistry depart-
ment of the University of Minne-
sota has recently installed two
metabolism machines and equip-
ment with which to conduct respir-
atory tests. Student volunteers
who are willing to forfeit break-
fast will be used as patients for
the experiments.
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
-Northwestern university feared
that it would have to either de-
clare an extra vacation or hold its
classes in the jail.
Sixty-seven students were arrest-
ed for traffic offenses one morning
and the drive was stopped only be-
cause there was no more room in,
the court room.

OHIO STATE UNXVERSITY-
Closer contact between the fresh-
men and the college is the aim of
the 1929 Freshnan Week program
here. The slogan for the week, ac-
cording to Dean C. W. Reeder, is
to be, "An interview with every
freshman during Freshman Week."
VIENNA, AUSTRIA-A dispatch
from the Neue Freie Presse con-
tains the startling news that 36
students were stabbed and 17 seri-
ously wounded in a street fight be-
tween Christians and Jews. The
fight was the culmination of a
feud which had existed for a long
time between the rival sects in the
student body.'
LAFAYETTE COLLEGE.--Recent
tests have shown that students who
are underweight receive better
grades than those who are either
normal or slightly obese.
NEW HAVEN, Conn.-Upon rec-
.ommendation of the Student Coun-
cil of Yale University, high ranking
juniors and seniors have been given
unlimited cut privileges for the re-
mainder of the academic year.
According to a recent report of
the federal bureau of education
there are about 1,000,000 college
students in the United States. Of
this number approximately 20,000
are foreign students, the greatest
number of them coming from South
America.
Another group of journalists has
made a paper a bit too warm.,
Thirteen students have been sus-
pended from the University of
California for publishing Hell's
Bells, the semi-annual razz sheet.

Charles Evans Hughes, Jr.
I Charles Evans Hughes, Jr., of New
York, son of the famous lawyer and
former secretary of state, has been
named U. S. solicitor-general by
President Hoover.
Hughes succeeds William B. Mit-
chell, now attorney-general.
Italy Blocks Work
Of Alien Scientists

No Foreign Archeologists To
Among Italian Ruins
Is Latest Ruling

Dig

"The Italian government hasE
effectively blocked the attempts of
foreign scientific institutions to
conduct archaelogical excavations
of their own by decreeing that only
scholars of their own country may
dig up ancient ruins," declared Prof.
James E. Dunlap yesterday in dis-
cussing recent discoveries made at
Herculaneum.
The hard crust of lava, said Pro-
fessor Dunlap, prohibits very speedy
work, and the Italian expeditions
do not have the capital to com-
plete their work rapidly. There are
American, British, French and
German academies of Archaelogy
located at Rome, and their scholars
would be only too glad to assist in
excavation projects.

1

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Vampire vs. Wife
A page from life!

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330 S. State St.

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Petticoats and Politics Don't Mix

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