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May 09, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rPAMTWO 'I

,THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 9, 1920

REGISTRATIONS FOR ENRLLMENT IN, SUMMER'
p CAMP TAKEN BY DEPARTMENT OF SURVEYING:
SITE LOCATED IN WYOMING FOREST RESERVE

ENROLLMENT WILL BE LIMITED
TO APPROXIMATELY 16
STUDENTS
70 CLOSE IN TWO WEEKS
E itpent Will Include New Build-
ing And Sanitary
System
Registrations for the summer sur-
veying camp of the Engineering
callege, to be located this year for
the first time on a newly acquired
trct in the heart of a Wyoming na-
tinal forest reserve, are being
taken by the Department of Geode-
sg and Surveying of the Engineer-
ig college. Enrollment will close
wtthin two weeks, notice was served
late yesterday by Prof. Clarence T.
Johnson, who will be director of the
caMp.
Camp Davis, as the summer field
station has been named, is located.
on a 120 acre tract, recently pur-
chased by the University. The4
property, located in the middle of
a forest reserve, is situated on the
Hoback river, about 20 miles south-
east of Jacson, Wyoming, and isy
about 70 miles south of the south-.
eri boundary of Yellowstone Na-
tional park.
Students Will Works
Since the land surrounding the
University's plot, is government-
owned, the engineering students
will have access to several 1001
s uare miles of land, for their sur-
vying 'yield work. Because of the
extensive area in which work can i
be carried on, it is planned to have
the surveying field laid out on a
single gigantic project, instead of a
number of smaller undertakings as
has been the case in the past.
Until this year, the summer sur-
vet ng work of the engineering stu-1
its has been done at the Bog-
rdus tract, on Douglas lake, near
Cheboygan. Here the University
has some 30,000 acres which have,
been used for a biological station,
as well as a summer engineering
camp.
Will Accommodate Sixteen
rDuring the past few years, how-!
ever, this tract has become heavily
o<, rgrown with underbrush and
young timber. These proved a
hlandicap to the surveyors, and ne-
ceositated spending considerable
*rie in clearing out the under-
* th. At the pew camp, in Wy-
orig, although the land is a forest
rserve, it is not properly timber
Fbor the coming summer, the
capwill be able to care for ap-
pyoximately 16 students, and, as
yt of these reservations have al-
ri&y been taken, the directors are
4:ing that the others planning to
rll to do so at once. Expenses
for the entire session of the camp,
iicluding transportation wil be
uiner $200, according to a state-
ient yesterday by the director.'
4Because -the camp is new, the
grounds must be developed and
buidings erected. To do this work
it is planned to have the students
do construction work for two weeks
prior to the opening of the regular
school. For this they will receive
ctinpensation.
Equipment for the camp will in-

elude permanent buildings, electric
Ilights, a sanitary system, and run-
ning water. Housing quarters for
students will be increased as the
prospective enrollment enlarges, ac-
cording to the present plans.
Beautiful Camp Site
The new camp, 1700 miles distant
from Ann Arbor, is in the center of
a picturesque and mountainous
country. It has in its vicinity many
points of interest, from the view-
point of natural phenomena. Out-
standing of these is a three mile
landslide from one of the Teton
mountains into the Granite river.
This avalanche of sand and gravel
caused a damn 300 feet in height
across the river. A large share of
.this has already been washed away
by the river.
Of interest from the standpoint
of engineering, are several large
projects, located in the neighbor-
ihood. of the new camp. There is
the Shoshone dam, measuring 328
'feet in height and 20 feet in length,
It is one of the three highest dams
in the country. In addition to this
there is the huge reclamation proj-
ect at the base of Jackson lake, and
several gigantic highway construc-
tions.
Members of the camp staff will
be, in addition to Prof. Johnston as
director, Prof. J. H. McFarlane, who
has charge of transportation and
organization, Prof. Harry Bouchard,
Prof. Clifton O. Carey, and Prof.
Edward Young.
Co-eds at the University of Ne-
braska are carrying clubs and pis-
tols to protect themselves from a
mysterious night maurader whose
favorite sport is jumping from be-
hind trees and bushes and pursu-
ing the ladies in a most unconven-
tional fashion. We can't help but
feel sorry for that poor maurader
if a co-ed turns on him with a club
-thd pistol would not be so accur-
ate.
SOME
FRATERNITY BADGES
1-3 Off
Stop into the store. You may be
among the fortunate ones and
find yours at this exceptional,
price
BURR PATTERSON & AULD
603 Church Street
Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
4 The! All-Star Fun Classic
The Royal Family
Nights, $1, $1.50, $, $2.50 and $3
Wednesday Matinee
Best Seats $2
LAFAYETTE
SHUBERT
THURSTON
The Famous Magician
and his daughter Jane
Prices: Nights, Sat. and Sunday
Mats., 50c, $1 and $1.50

BISHOP TALKS ON
LIBRARY CAREER
"Library work is not a business
for making money for you cannot I
work outside of the library like a1
lawyer, doctor or engineer," said
Librarian Bishop yesterday after-
noon in a lecture to prospective li-
brarians in the General Library
lecture room "It is a social serv-
ice combined with executive skill
and scholarship and offers more
than a living to those engaged in
the profession."
After an introduction by Dean
Effinger of the Literary School, Li-
brarian Bishop discussed in detail
the development of the work in the
United States, its growing pro-
fessionalism, requirements and pos-
sibilities. "When I came to Michi-
gan in 1906," said the Librarian, "the
staff consisted of three full-time
and six part-time members with
ninety thousand books; now we
have a staff of 107 full time and
from 35-40 part-time members, and
700,000 books. Eight thousand
books are shelved in the study
halls as collateral reading whereas
early teaching methods required no
outside reading."
"All informaton comes into play
in library work but general re-
quirements consist of a sound col-
lege education and a thorough
knowledge in one or two lines,
especially political science and
municipal government. French
and German are required for en-
trance to the Library school and
a Bachelor of Arts degree with 50
per cent more honor points than
hours will be required in 1930," he
concluded.
A freshman at the University of
South Dakota has a three passen-
ger biplane which enables him to
go 70 miles to his home every
week-end and still be on time for
his 8 o'clock Monday morning.

B. AND G. HEAD TO0
SHIPMENTOFPLTESATTEND__MEETING
The Bulidings and Grounds De-
partment heads will convene this
.1---.year at Boulder, Colo. Among
Second Order Of Michigan Dinner 1 those who will be present at the
Plates Is New Being Shipped convention which is scheduled for
From .England Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
of next -week, is Mr. E. C. Pardon,
GIVE VIEWS OF CAMPUS superintendent of the Buildings
Dispatches received at the Alum- and Grounds Department of the
ni association offices yesterday in- university. The convention is at-,
dicate that the second shipment of teded by delegates from all of the
500 sets of Michigan dinner plates 'Big Ten schools, Cornell, Rochester
will arrive in the United States university and several other
this week. schools and colleges of the coun-
Last year, the Alumni association try.
created a set of Michigan dinner E ImNdmlmliII

Faculty Aerologist
Awarded Scholarsh-p'
Leonard R. Shneider, chief aero-
logist at Mt. Evans, the UniversityI
Greenland expeditions camp, hasc
been presented with a Scandina-
vian-American fellowship ,of $1,000 t
for the purpose -of studying geologyI
and aerology in the Scandinavian ]
countries. The project which will1
consist mainly of research work into
the air conditions of those coun-1
tries will be started about Augustj
1st, when the University camp
closes.
Mr. Shneider has been a mem-
ber of the Greenland expeditions
for several years.

STUDENTS MAKE
INSPECTION TRIP
Thirty College of Pharmacy stu-
dents left this morning in a special
bus for a three day inspectiori trip
of various manufacturing plants
and institutions. The first stop
will be made at Battle Creek where
trips will be made through the
Kellogg company plant and the
Battle Creek sanitarium.
The Upjohn company, manufac-
turers of pharmaceutical goods, at
Kalamazoo will be visited this
afternoon. The group plans to
reach Chicago by this evening.
Tomorrow the students will be
conducted through the plant of
Bauer and Black in Chicago.

I

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