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May 08, 1929 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-08

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Come Out And Register For

The All

-Campus Elections Today!

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ESTABLISHED
1890

ICr

44V 4hr
tr t

4 augl

S MEMBER I
PRESSI

Vol. XXXIX, No. 160 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 1929.

EIGHT PAGES

WOLVERINES r TAKE'
SECONDBALL GAME
FROM MEIJI TEAM
HOME NINE DUPLICATES SCORE
OF MONDAY'S VICTORY
IN SIXTH INNING
JAPANESE SCORE IN FIFTH!
Montague Rplaces Asbeck On
Mound and Reichman Bats;
For Truskowski
By Morris Quinnj
Michigan staged. a 'three run
rally at the expense of Nakamura,
Meiji right hander, in the last half
of the sixth inning to duplicate
Monday's 3-2 victory over the hus-
tling Japanese nine and win the
series yesterday on the Fery field
diamond. The Wolves went into
their half of the sixth trailing the
Invaders by two runs, which were
zcoied in the fifth and sixth in-
I ings.
Fred Asbeck was on te mound
for the Wlverines team and Naka-
rmura, who pitched the last three
innings of the initial encounter ofI
the series, opposed him. The big
Maize and Blue, right hander ex-
perienced .no trouble until the
fifth' retiring the Orientals in
order, while Nakamura had little
more difficulty in disposing of the
Michigan batters.
Japanese Score Twice
Meiji scored a run in the fifth
after two men had been retired.
Yonezawa was safe when Moodie's
bad throw pulled McCoy off the
bag. He stole second and moved
up to third on a pass ball, scoring
PWltweaul a singled sharply past
third for the first hit gleaned from
Asbeck's offerings.
The Japsaddea another counter
to their total in the sixth after
Zenimura was called out on a
close decision at first. Tabe smash-
ed a triple to deep left field and
Washlio dropped a clean single
into center to send him across the
plate.
Michigan came to life in her half
of the same inling after threaten-
ing to score in both the fourth and
fifth, runners being left on third
in both cases, by counting three
times to offset the two run lead
amassed by the speedy little Japs.
Michigan Makes Three Tallies
Nebelung was out on a grounder
to short, Tabe to Washio. Red
Corriden send a sizzling double in-
to left center for two bases and
promptly stole third. Staub drew
a base on balls and Mano fumbled
Kubicek's grounder.
Coach Fisher sent Montague, a
recruit pitcher, to the mound in
the eighth with Reichman replac-
ing Truskowski behind the bat. He
retired the invaders in order in
the eighth and got Washio to start
the ninth but Masu walked. Then
Sumida ended the game by hitting
into a fast double play, Myron to
Kubicek to McCoy.
The box score:
I. BOX SCORE
0---- O,

GAMES ELECTION
SET BY WILCOX
Freshmen will elect their captainj
for the annual spring games at a
mass meeting to be held at 7:30
o'clock to night in the assembly
room of the Union, according to an
announcement made yesterday by
Jackson A. Wilcox, '30, chairman of
the underclass department of the
Union which has charge of all
I freshman groups.
Beside the Varsity band and a
Varsity cheer leader, the program
will include talks by Prof. William
A. Frayer, of the history depart-
!ment, and Frederick M. Asbeck, '29, ,
president of the Student council.I
Following the election, Wilcox will
present medals furnished by the In-
tramural department to the mem-
ber of the union freshman group
basketball team which won the spc-
cial tournament run off during the1
ui vntp

SENATE RALLIES
TILLY APOITED TO AID HOOVER

[11 Of DAIli

WASHING'
determinedE
ministration
ority for def
benture plan
Hoover, an e
within their

I
A

SIMONS, ROSENBERG, WARNER discouragemc
ALSO GIVEN POSITIONS pected to be
ON STAFF that feature
The most
WOMEN'S EDITOR CHOSEN debentureg
favorofe
Night Editors, Summer Daily Staff, sevon. Mfe
And Other Appointments tration groul
To Be Made Later their strengt
expressed th
Senior appointments for the edi- ( extremely cl

Associated Press)
ETON, May 7.-Despite
efforts by Senate ad-
leaders to rally a maj -
feat of the export de-
opposed by President
lement of unsteadiness
ranks today brought
ent on what was ex-
the eve of a vote on,
of the farm relief bill.
recent check by the
;roup was asserted to
rgin of five votes in
taining that disputedI
mbers of the adminis-
p declined to estimate
h but the opinion was
at the vote would be
ose.

FAMOUS SCHOLAR
AND AUTHOR DIES
IL E HE OR
PROFSO COOLEYJ
END COMES TO EMINENT MAN
AFTER ILLNESS OF

wilr
Members of the sophomore class torial staff of The Daily for the
elected Albert Donahue as the cap- coming year were announced yes- T
tam of their spring games group terday afternoon by Ellis B. Merry,
at a meeting held yesterday after- '31L newly selected managing
noon in Natural Science auditor-i I
ium. The new captain announced editor.
the first meeting of the sophomore George C. Tilley, '30, was named
board of strategy in conjunction editor to succeed Nelson J. Smith,
with the entire sophomore body '29 who took of-
would take place at 8:30 o'clock to- ',cewotooheof-
morwngtilro 1 ftefie at the be-
morrow night in room 31 of the ginning of the Seniors Who Have High Scholastic
Union.isecond semester. Records To Be Recognized at
Convocation
Pierce Rosenberg, v
,30 was appoint- ~
ed city editor, the OTHER SPEAKERS NAMED
position now held
bTA T ND E.29StewArt Honoring the members of the
Hooker,' student body who have maintained
ON ST DENT ACT N George E. Sim- outstanding scholastic records, the
ons, '30, will fill University will hold its annual Hon-
the office of news ors Convocation ati1 o'clock to-
Disgraceful Condition Of Last editor now held morrow morning in Hill audito-
Year's Swing Out Must Not by Richard C. Tilley ium. Although the convocation is
Re-occur Declares Council Kurvink, '29, and , primarily in honor of the 10 per
+ Edward L. Warner, Jr., '30, was ap- cent of each senior class who had
SUSPENSION IS PENALTY pointed sports editor. W. Morris attained the highest averages, win-
Quin,.'9,is the outgoing sports ners of special awards and mem-
Quin, 29,s bers of the lower classes whose aca-
Continuance of one of Michi- editor demic records are extraordinary are
gan's oldest traditions will depend The women's editorship, now also expected to be present.
largely on the contuct of the sen- held-byk y SylviaS:-Stone,29,rwill Most of the seniors who will be
ior classes at Swing Out tomorrow _be takenbyMar- present are members of honor so-
afternoon. 'In view of the dis- jorie Follmer, '30. cieties which have announced their
graceful demonstration of last Tilley, Simons elections during the past few
year, the Student Council and the; and R s en berg weeks while the holders of fellow-
University Discipline committee were members of ships and special awards have also
have concurred on a plan of dras- this year's staff been announced previous to this
tic action in regard to any indi- as night editors, time.
viduals guilty of misconduct to- and have each John C. Parker, '01, of Brooklyn,
morrow. Suspension, even at this been connected will be the principal speaker to ad-
late date, is certain for offenders. wi h The Daily {dress the group. Mr. Parker is a
In a resolution recently passed te spring well known engineer who was a
the Student Council stated its posi- of 1s927. Rosen- member of several honor sociis
tion as follows:.ieties
"RESOLVED.-That the Stu- berg was chair- during his undergraduate day on
dent Council heartily favors man of the pub- the campus.
the continuance of this tradi- Simons licity committee In addition to those who are lion-
tion, but feels that if a repeti- for this year's ored by the convocation for schol-
ion of the disgraceful acts of Opera astic achievement are alarge group
last year are in evidence at The new sports and women's edi- anoucedAogi srupyet
Swing Out this year, it will tors, Edward L. Warner, Jr., '30, and aIlnounced.Giser Clelai B. wyle
support its abolishment. If Miss Follmer, have also been mem- lie, and Charles A. Lewis, winners
Swing Out is to continue, it is bers of the staff during the same of the McNaught Medals in journ-
the duty of every senior who time. I alism; Ormand J. Drake and Rob-
Iparticipates to see that his' George Stauter, ert J. Gessner, who were awarded
codu is above reproach a j ,32, the present Paul Gray Testimonials in ora-
k to prevent anyone from parti-
cipating whose actions are out telegraph editor tory; Ollie Backus, Virginia L
was renamed to Hought, Helen McComb, Rose N.
efill that position Stewart, Lora V. Vanden Berg, and
tee of the Council shall carry Appointments to , Lois E. Webb, who were given Elea-
tal ee ofhecouc saoltarr
all cases of misconduct to the the editorship of nor C. Ford Testimonials in De-
University Discipline, it the Music and bate; and Carl Andeer, Fenelon W.
tee and support the punish- Drama column B. Bocsche, Stephen E. Jones,
I ment that these cases deserve. will be announc- Nathan Levy, Leo T. Norville and
John E. Webster, who won John S.
Suspension for a senior at this ed at a later date Gray Testimonials in debate.
late date does not seem too as will the ap- Harold C. Reynolds and William
severe in view of the long pointment of theI J. Reynolds won Lloyds scholarships
! standing of this honored tra- night editors and in marine engineering, while Ray-
dition." assistant city edi- mond D Hetterick won the Rho
1 Classes will form at 3:30 o'clock tor. Rosenberg Ch p eterin the Do
tomorrow afternoon along the i Chi prize in pharmacy and Donald
'tomkronwtampternoon dalong othe!For the position of managing edi- S. Breisch won the Lehn and Fink
from the medallion in front of the tor and business manager of The prize in pharmacy.
I Library: The line will proceed Summer Daily, further student ap- Medals rhetoi were awarKe
north-west on the diagonal to 4 plications will be considered, it to R. Leslie Askren, Donna K.
State and North University. was announced by Prof. Morris P. Jones, Richard L. Tobin and Fran-
Prof. William D. Henderson, di Tilley, chairman of the Board in I cis X. Roelinger. The Weeks
rector of the University Extension Control. These communciations to Arthur M. Culler, and the Phi
-Division, selected as speaker for should be filed in seven copies at Lambda Upsilon scholarship in
this year's observance of Swing I the business office of the Board in chemical engineering was won by
Out, will then address the seniors. Control at the Press building. Wilburn C. Schroeder.
~~!T T~ ABL (' ~T~ ~The Board in Control of Ath-.
ROUN DTABLE CLUB INVITES 'LIBERALS letics scholarship award went to
TO M ET T U ION THU SDA NIHT1Allan C.-Lamont and the Class of j
TOMEET AT UNION THURSDAY NIGHT a1908 memorial scholarship waswon
by James A. Sprowl.

BURIAL AT FOREST ILLS
Dr. Cooley Was Former Chief Justice
Of State And Faculty Member
For Thirty Years
Private funeral services for Prof.
Charles Horton Cooley, resigned
head of the sociology department,
who died early yesterday morning
following a long illness, will be
held at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon
at his residence, 703 Forest avenue.
Interment will be in Forest Hills
Cemetery.
Professor Cooley, long recognized
as one of America's most eminent
sociologists, had been ill for the
last eight months. Since an opera-
tion on March 14, he grew steadily
worse, and after a brave but futile
fight, passed away quietly at 1'1
o'clock yesterday morning at his
home.
Had Resigned April 26
Although relinquishing his teach-
ing duties shortly after the begin-
ning of the second semester when
his courses were taken over by his
colleagues, Professor Cooley's resig-
nation was just accepted at the
last meeting of the Board of Re-
gents on April 26.
Like his father, Thomas M. Coo-
ley, former chief justice of the
Michigan Supreme Court, who
taught here in the law school for
ever 30 years, the noted sociologist
was one of the oldest men in point
of service on .the University faculty,
having begun his career here 37
years ago as an assistant in the
department of political economy.
He had received his bachelor of arts!
degree from the University in 1887.
and his doctor of philosophy in
1894. On August 17 of this year, he
would have celebrated his sixty-
fifth birthday.
Chief among his many works are
four books rated among the best
ever written in the sociological
field: "Human Nature and the So-
ical Order," "Social Organization,"
"Social Progress,' and his lat-
est published in 1927, "Life and the
Student."
Associates Express Loss
Following are several comments
by his colleagues in the sociology
department:
PROF. ARTHUR E. WOOD: In
the death of Professor Cooley the
University sustains an irreparable
loss. Professor Cooley's teaching
has been a unique contribution to,
American sociology. His loss will be
shared by a wide group of students
both in sociology and the other so-
cial sciences.
PROF. LOWELL J. CARR: Those
who have been privileged to work
in close association with Professor
Cooley find it very difficult to put
into words what his loss means
Michigan has lost one of the out-
standing members of her faculty
and those of us in the department
have lost a wise counsellor and!
steadfast friend.
PROF. ROY H. HOLMES: While:
it will be truly said that the Uni-
versity and the educational world
as a whole have lost an eminent1
scholar of the first rank, some of
us are at this time more keenly
conscious of something else. It is
Cooley, the man, kindly, human,
the sympathetic friend and adviser
whom we have lost and whose place
no one else can fill.

Charles Horton CooleyI
Eminent sociologist, who died at
his home on Forest avenue yester-
day morning after a lingering ill-
ness. At the last meeting of the
Board of Regents Professor Cooley's,
resignation as head of the soci-
ology department of the University
had been accepted. Nation wide
fame had been attained by him be-
cause of the great scope of his
sociological work.
E1iMINATINRACE
Detroit Times Entry Reported Safe
at Newcomb, N. Y.; Navy Ship
Fies 900 Miles
ARMY BAG ALSO ENTERED
PITSBURGH, May 7.--The Navy
balloon No. 1 tonight was credited
with winning the 1929 national
elimination balloon race. The crew
of the Detroit Times entry, last of1
the bags to report, advised race
headquarters late today that they
had landed near Newcomb, N. Y.,
and that all was well despite dis-
comfort experienced in landing in
an isolated district. E. J. Hill pilot-
ed the "Times" entry and Arthur
Schlosser was his aide.
The flight of the 12 race entries
must be checked with the Nationalj
Aeroinautical Association before the
winner is declared officially. The
Navy No. 1, piloted by Lieut. T. G.
W. Settle, came down near Char-
lottetown, Prince Edward Island,
traveling a distance estimated un-
officially 900 miles. The bag was in
the air 44 hours.
Nearly three days had elapsed
since the 12 balloons left here late
Saturday before the Detroit Times
entry was found. The distance cov-
ered by the craft was estimated at
approximately that travelled by the
Goodyear No. 7, piloted by Ward T.
Van Orman.
First and second place winners in
the national race are entitled to
compete in the International bal-
loon race. The United States will
have a third entry in the interna-
tional this year, Captain W. G.
Kepner of the Army being the de-
fender. He won both the national
and international in 1928.
o -o
j Michiganensians will be dis- I
I tributed from the year book of- I(
j fice in the Press Building for the I
j remainder of this week. After j
I this time all claims on the 1929 I
j Michiganensian will be void.
j There are still a few copies of
I the book available which may be I
I obtained at $5.50. j

COUNCIL CHOOSES,
CANIDAIS TON
ON CAMPUS BLO
REIF, McBRIDE, AND SIMONS
ENTER CONTEST FOR
PRESIDENCY
GRAFT TO BE ELIMINATED
Students Must Identify Themselves
In Order To Register For
Voting Purposes
With registration for the All-
Campus election scheduled for to-
day and tomorrow, the Student
Council last night went into nom-
inating session and picked George
E. Simons, '30, Jennings McBride,
'30, and Ernest C. Reif, '30, to run
for the presidency. Simons has
been a night editor on The Daily
this year, while Reif and McBride
have been juiior members of the
council.
Nominees Selected
Selections of candidates for the
three positions of senior represen-
tative include Alexander K. Gage,
Jr., '30, Philip S. Cochran, '30E.,
John F. Rice, '30, Donald J. Kline,
'30, Earl A. Kloster, '30, and Leo T.
Norville, '30. Those nominated for
the junior memberships are Charles
T. Baldwin, '31, Lawrence C. Ho-
bart, '31, Mathew C. Haddon, '31E.,
John W. Yeagley, '31, Francis H.
Bebee, '31E., and Harold B. Palmer,
'31.
Due to the fact that eligibility of
some of the nominees is doubtful,
it will be necessary for the candi-
dates who have received D's or E's
during the past semester to obtain
special -permission to run from the
dean of the college in which they
are registered-and present.a c rel-
ficate of eligibility to Frederick M.
Asbeck, '29, president of the coun-
cil, before Friday.
Outline Registration Procedure
! Registration desks in charge of
councilmen and their deputies will
be located at various strategic
points on the campus both today
and tomorrow. Prospective voters
will have to identify themselves by
means of Union cards, treasurer's
certificates, or special certificates
of registration in the University
which may be obtained at the Re-
corder's office.
The registree must then fill out
a stub detachable blank in a regis-
tration book, the stub being retain-
ed by the election official for com-
piling a voters' list, and the blank
being kept by the voter for iden-
tification at the polls Wednesday.
Prominent Alumnus
Scheduled To Speak
To Fathers And Sons
Judge Day And Coach Yost Will
Speak Before Annua Banquet
At Union Saturday i
. With the securing of Judge Wil-
liam L. Day, 'OL, of Cleveland, for-
mer Varsity athlete and well known
speaker, and Coach Fielding H.
j Yost as speakers for the banquet
I the Union's annual Father and Son
! Saturday night, arrangements for
weekend which takes place this
week end are virtually complete.
I Tickets for the program and ban-
f quet will continue on sale each af-
ternoon of this week at the main
desk in the Union lobby. The price

is $1.50 a piece, and provides ad-
mission to the banquet to be held
Saturday night.
Through the courtesy of the Ath-
letic association, the fathers' tick-
Illinois-Michigan baseball game on
eta include free admission to the
Saturday afternoon. The Butter-
field interests have provided free
,tickets to the Majestic for Saturday
evening. These are subject to a 10
cent tax levied on complimentary
tickets. Fathers will also be admit-
ted to the Union pool.

MEIJI AB
Zenimura, rf ......4
Tabe, ss ..........4
Washio, lb........ .4
Masu, cf ...........3
Sumida, 3b .......4
Yonezawa, if ......3
Tezuka, c........3
Nakamura, p ......3
Mano, 2b ..........3

R
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

H
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
1
0

0
2
3
7
1
0
2
5
1
3

A
0
2
0
0
1
0
2
1

E
0
0
0l
0l
0'
0
0
0
1

i I

f) -

- {

a aU

i-

Totals ..........31 2 5 24 '7 1
MICHIGAN AB R H O A E
Nebelung,if.......3 0 1 1 0 0
Corriden, if ...... 3 1 1 1 0 0
Straub, rf ........ 3 1 2 0 0 01
Kubicek, 2b.......4 1 1 4 5 01
Moodie, 3b ....... 4 0 0 2 3 11
McCoy, lb.........3 0 2 13 0 0
Myron,ss ........ 4 0 0 0 2 0
Truskowski, e....3 0 0 6 2 0
Reichman,c .......0 0 0 0 0 0
Asbeck, p ........ 2 0 0 0 0 0
*Centenni.........1 0 1 0 0 0
Montague, p ..... 0 0 0 0 2 0
Totals ...........30 3 8 27 14 11

All students who are interested from the University, which is, in-
in liberal thought in preservindj cidentally, a school of national I
academic freedom are urged to at- note.
tend a meeting of the Round Table' This club has waged a long fight
club which will be held at 8 o'clock for the right of free speech and
Thursday evening in the Union. free assemblag6, but the tyranny
This meeting will be of short dur- of the University backed by the'
ation and no more will be asked of powerful interests which were be-
the prospective members than their ing attacked by the students, suc-
time. ceeded in forcing them off the
This club has been organized fol- campus. A philosophy professor
inloine- the ennision of the Uni-. who believed in their nolicies was;'

Five Orators Left In
Thomas Black Contest
Preliminary judging in the
Thomas E. H. Black oratorical
contest, which was held in room
302 Mason Hall last evening, has
elfminated all but five of the con-
testants for the $100 prize offered

PROMINENT STUDENTS WILL SOLICIT
FUNDS FOR FRESH AIR CAMP TODAY
Students prominent in campus ; Kappa Epsilon, Delta Delta Delta,
activities will sell tags today in IAlpha Epsilon Iota, Kappa Delta,
the annual appeal for University f Alpha Omicron Pi, Sigma Alpha
Fresh Air camp funds made by the Epsilon and Alpha Sigma Phi.
Student Christian association. The The camp is entirely a Univer-
goal of the drive, which will last sity project, and is supported sole-
only one day this year, will be ly by funds contributed by students
$3,000. and alumni. The student funds go
The preliminary drive for house I towards running expenses of the
organization contributions has net-jcamp, while the alumni contribu-
ted $991.75 thus far, with several I tions are used largely for additions
organizations not vet renorting. i and renlaements n the eauinment

1
4
i
.

rwl a~ther, n~

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