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May 02, 1929 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-02

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TFrM TIT tA q'TAIEY-

- ~lI~rn5x% ~

.v .
: . , . . , .

Published ev ery morning except Monday
diung the University year by the Board in
Control of Studest Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled:to the use fo' republication of all news
dispatches redited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news" pub-
Uished herein.
Entered at tie postoffice at Ana Arbor,
Michigan, ts second class matter. Special rate
of postag# granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subsciption by carrier, 94.00; by mail,
(fficest Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
mard Street.
Phones: Fdiforial, 4425; Business, 2x214.

terway project which requires
sacrifices and efforts by Canada
and the United States if the move-
ment is to be a success.
That relation, then, makes such
conferences as the one held last
week invaluable. It would seem
that not only should one delegate
go over to talk about such matters
1 of interest, but that occasionallyj
Iprominentpersons in the power of
both countries should gather for
social and political intercoursel
which must inevitably result in a
l better understanding and a more
genuine appreciation of the neces-
I sity for whole-hearted co-operation

t
a
z

EDITORTAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
$ENNETh G. PATRIC$

between .two great nations of, this
continent.
COMPROMISE
Discarding its former attitude
of "take our proposition or leave.

EdItor...................Nelson J. Smith
C ity Editor .............. stewart (Hooker
News Editor............Richard C. Kurvink
Sports Editor..............W. Morris Quinn
Women's .Editor....... ......Sylvia S. Stone
Telegraph Editor.............George Staute,
Music and Drama.... ......R. 1. Askren
Assistant City Editor........... Robert Silbar

I;

joseph E. Howe
Doald J. Kline
Lawrence R. Klt
G
Paul L. Adams
Morris Alexande
C. A. Askren
Bertram Askwit
Louise Behyme-
Arthur Bernste
Seton C. Bovee
Isabel Ccharles
L. R. Chubbs
frank F. Coope
Helen Domine
Margaret Fckels
Douglas Edward
Valborg itgelan'
Robert J. Feldm
Marjorie Follme
William Gentry
Ruth Geddes
David B. Hemps
Richard Jung
Charles R. Kauf
Ruth Kelsey

Night Editors
l g Charles S. Monroe
Picrce Rosenberg
ein George E. Simone
George C. Tilley
Reporters
Donald E. Layman
Charles A. Lewis
Marian McDonald
Henry Merry
Elizabeth Quaife
Victor Rabinowitz
J oseph A. Russell
Anne Schell
Rachel Shearer
r Howard Simon
Robert L. Sloss
s Ruth Steadman
Is A. Stewart
,d Cadwell Swansea
Ian Jane 'rhayer
er dith Thomas
Beth Valentine
Gurney Williams
tead Jr. Walter Wilds
George . Wohlgemuth
frnan Edward L. Warner Jr.
Cleland Wyllie

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
ALurstant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
Advertising................Alex K. Scherer
Advertising................A. amesHJordan
ARdvertising...........Car, W. Hamimer
Service....... ....Herbert E. VarnumI
Circulation............... George S. Bradley
Accounts...............Lawrence E. Vaikley
Publications...............Ray M. Hofelich

it," the. United States has adopted
a new policy of conciliation in dis-
armament. Ambassador Gibson
has shown the delegates from the
other powers meeting at Geneva
that this country no longer obsti-
nately clings to a fixed method by
which the tonnage ratio shall be
applied, but rather would consider
other means of settling the prob-
lem.
Although America's concessions
in the matter of armies and navies
have as yet had no effect as far
as actual reductions go, they have
done much to reduce the friction
caused by conflicting internatonal
viewpoints. The United States,
though ti would A eckon trained
reserves as part of a nation's army,
has allowed France and Japan to
omit this item from due consider-
ation. Mr. Gibson has likewise con-
ceeded to the French view that
each nation should be granted a
total tonnage for ships and be al-
lowed to build whatever kind that
particular nation felt it needed.
France and Italy stayed out of
the last disarmament conference
principally because the tonnage
was not to be apportioned to each
country, and the most effective
auxiliary of both of these nations,
the submarine, was to be ruled out.
While neither England. nor the
United States has any great need
for this type of offensive ship,
France and Italy, with their exten-
sive coasts, regard the craft essen-
tion to their security.
The adopton of this conciliatory
attitude by the Hooveil administra-
tion will go far toward the solution
of some of the world's most try-

OAED ROLLS AB ks
SOME REPORTER
SAMPLE
C y Meyer Levin. The oohn Day
Pell: Who was that lady I seen Company, Jan., 1929
you with last night? A hard-boiled romantic, a cub
* '*reporter on a big Chicago news-
I paper; a young man with ideals,
Meli: That wasn't no lady, but reveling in the realities of life
that was my wife! -that is the nameless hero of this
* * * . book: The Reporter. Here lies the
krunning story of life on the city
door? *desk, told in frankness and faith;
told of high moments and sharp_
Stunk: When it's ajar-ha, excitements, of blatant celebra-
ha, ha, yeoow! tions of beer lords, of shrinking
tragedies in Little Italy, o emo-
Well, Lark, I guess I get the job, tions raw from exposure.
'eh? Daily does this reporter view the I
Seven Years Itch. violations of life, the abnormalities,
* **and yet he glories in every gro-
HERE'S ANOTHER tesquerie, every brutality that fur-
Dear laRk: Ima good Ejucatid nishes copy. At times his work
gUyl and ide like To rite rOles wen arouses him to passionate senti-
yoU leve,, havE i gotta chance- ments; again, he is overwhelmed by
yurz TRuly, here8s my collom:-, the pathos of stray souls that have
$ $ $ + fallen foul of the city. He is sent
fIrsst guY: wHy doze The chick- on assignments covering wars of
un crossed the rode? beer lords, interviewing men prom-
$ $ $ inent in public life, and always he
sEccund Fella: (Ive forGotten is on the search for elusive "fee-
the anser, lArk, he, he, he.) ee-tures." Chicago of a few years
& & & ago, with all its hard-boiled char-
aftEr i lern Better how to opr- acters, gunman, swindlers, and mo-
ate a Typeriter ile be all set so rons, is there for the Reporter to
Keap my name On hand, lArk, will write of-a Chicago so accurately
1 you; described, interpreted so subtlely
Haff Whit. that one can pick out actual men
* * * and events from under the thin
Dear Lark: Veneer of words. Actual news
I think you're just darling and breaks of 1924-26-from the elab-
it's a shame it actually is that you orate funeral of a gangster, to the
are not going to write your lovely arrests of swindler "Kid Phiel" are
columns any more and I'm all un there, written under hidden names,
and frothing with dismay I mean I but easily identified with their true
am actually am that you're not go- characters.
ing to write Rolls any more, but Typographically, the book is
Lark I do so want to write the unique. Dedicated to the myster-
column and here is my picture. ious Etaoin Shrdlu of newspaper-
-n e w sp ap er - d om , it h a s ev ery p ag e cap p ed w ith
a news headline, all concerning
some part of the book, but none re-
lated to the page on which it ap-
pears. Punctuating the pages are
the news stories Reporter has writ-
ten, set double column and com-
posed in journalistic style. The
plot of the book and the spaces be-
tween the news stories are concern-
ed with how these stories were
gathered, what experiences the Re-
porter had in getting them. Writ-
ten in impressionistic style, parts
of the book are very choppy, but
one gets swift, deft pictures of
May I write the column next events, sharp insights into the Re-
year, Lark? Please, please, pretty porter's mind.
please with sugar on it? Everything made copy for this
Mary- Gold. cub reporter, from Chicky, Dinky
Saprioni's pet mulatto, who danced
Gosh-you bet! I thought {naked on a table in an after-elec-
you were dead. tion celebration, to the necking cou-
Der l ples who-congregate along the lake
Dear Old Larie: Well, it's been front in Jackson Park; from hotel
a long while since I last wrote to hold-ups' to warfare in Vittorio
you; but in view of the fact that Manfredi's gang.
your advertisement for next year's Telephone in to the main office,
editor for the "Daily Headache" beat it out to Winnetka-who stole
appeared today, I feel that I just Janet Gray's pearls?-chase back to
must get in my application before Little Italy, back to the office again,
all the others arrive from Lapeer grab a photog, get to the scene....
and Kalamazoo. who?....where? ..why?what? ....
Following are my qualifications how?...get the names, feverish
for the position: Ihaste....gotta make a deadline....
1. Left tiddle, Varsity Tiddle- where's Catsnuts gone? He ought
wink Team, 1927, '28, and '29. not to climb in a window like that.
2. Have never paid for a Daily It's robbery. .. . thoughts of Linda,
or believed anything in it. Linda who had been seduced. He'd
3. Do not belong to SPHINX or have to see that guy; give him a
the Stoodent Council. word or two.... down to a smoky
4 Voted for Al Smith little city to cover a Legion conven-
5. Do not wear my Union but- tion. They brought a mule into the
.tn hotel and it did an embarrassing

6. Am not connected with the thing.... hooray!.. ..Fleshy-faced
B men in an undertaker's cellar
B. &. G. boys. stripping skin off a dead gangster.
7. I have never taken the course Postmortem. Blood always made
in Roman Band Instruments or Reporter nauseated... Stella, sweet-
Precious Gems.cuvdwhneecolmaep
8. I am the author of Wings of curved, who never could make up
Wax. her mind; Linda-dreams... .Jno-.
9. Did not contribute to the Tyrol, snoopy-eyed assistant city-
Daily's Vindication Fund. ed, nosing through his copy, hop-
10. Not connected with the D. ing for errors..Fifer, rewrite man,
damn him, never got a story right
11. Never have (or will) appre- ...names.... who's in charge of the
ciate Play Production's efforts. tomeeting...gets the facts....got-
12. Have never learned to use a Cumake a eadl newspaper life

U

Read the Classified Ads

FRATERNITY RINGS
AT DISCOUNTS OF
25% to 40%
49th Anniversary Sale'
Burr, Patterson and Auld Co.
603 Church Street

I

.ire..I .
. .
A
A

I

Drink:
D elicious and Refreshing
R4IM[Ar~

TO OUR PATRONS
Beginning Sunday, May 5,
and continuing through
June, July and August, we
will serve Sunday Noon
dinner until 3 p. m., with
no Sunday evening meal.
The Haunted Tavern
417 E. Huron St.

IL

Ain't Them
Hard Trials
About this time of the year, avail-
able funds grow scarce, and the
thot comes-"Is it worth the ef-
fort!" If it is financing your way
through school that bother$ yo%,In-
vestigate the Consumer's Merchan-
dise Association offer to student
salesmen. Earnings during vacation
for our salesmen range from $400 to
$2,500. Hard work does it. Exper-
ience is an asset but not required.
No investment. Write or call for
further information.
Consumers Merchandise Asso cation
410 Cedar Avenue
Minneapolis

K

7j.

r

ary Chase
? eanette Dale
ernor Davis
Bessie Egeland
Sally Faster
Anna Goldberg
Kasper Halverson
George Hamilton
ack Horwich
ix Hurphrey

k.Iutanta
Marion Kerr
Lillian Kovin'shy
Bernard Larson
Hollister Mabley
1. A. Newman
Jack Rose
Carl F. Schemm
George Spater
Sherwood Upton,
Marie Wellstead

"' ,' J
r''
.: :

OVE~
MILON
Ar DAIV

N
PR
Q TU
A
RE Si
BUT T(
All of which
we may be excus
that the pause that
sanest temptationu
ever succumbed to.
same millions the pa
freshes has come to n
cold Coca-Cola. It
delicious taste and cool a
of refreshment have pros
a little minute is long enot
a big rest any time.
The Coca-Cola Co., Atlanta,

OF COURSE IT'S NO
AIR PLAYING THE
ZOCTOR AND SPYING
T SUCH A DELICATE
ATION AS THIS.
UT TH EN, W E'RE
N O P RO CTOR.
ND WE C A N
ST ANYTHING
E M PTAT I ON
goes to prove (if
ed for saying so)
trefreshes is the
which millions
And to these
ause that re-
nean an ice-
s tingling,
fter-sense
ved that
ugh for
Ca.
YOU CAN'T BEAT T
PAUSE THAT REFRES

THURSDAY, MAY 2, 1929
Night Editor-Lawrence R. Klein
COLLEGIATE OPTIMISM
Optimism concerning the Ameri-
can collegiate body is. welcome.
When such optimism comes from
authoritative sources like Dean
Christian Gauss of Princeton; and
President Angell of Yale it is dou-
bly welcome. At a banquet given
by the Yale News the other night
both these well-known educators,
who have had their fingers on the
pulse of American education for
years, expressed the belief that the
ideals of educaton were nearer
achievement today than ever. be-
fore; and in both cases the ideal
uppermost was of educating the
student body.
President Angell said: "The col-
lege simply strives to give.the un-
dergraduate what he; asks for, pro-
vided his request is articulate and
logical. Dean Gauss said that col-
lege, ideally, should be a "place
where young gentlemen could as-+
sociate with other gentlemen, and
grow to maturity in common aims,+
riot only intellectual, but social1
and moral."<
It is heartening to find the, lead-+
ers at one in the belief that ther
undergraduate is the most import-
ant person in a university. Too
often do faculty celebrities 're-
gard the institution as merely the,
setting for scholastic investigations,
and the teaching of callow youth
is hurried as quickly and careless-
ly as possible. Creative work is de-
sirable at a university. But fac-
ulty creative work at the expense
of undergraduate education is un-
desirable. The creative work to be
emphasized is the bringing to ma-
turity of young gentlemen, by the
guiding hands of older gentlemenr
"with common ideals." Let us hope
that recognition of the necessity oft
such important work will bringi
about in colleges and universitiesr
stronger efforts to obtain facultyt
members who have such concep-1
lions of education.j
o- - - --0

,. , :.,
,
t
..
5

43.
0001*1,

ing , armament p
United States is now
to discuss willingly
which appears to be
effective.

roblems. The
in a position

any

scheme

HE
lIES.

feasible and

, t 4 'i

IT H AD TO BE G'O O D

TO G E T

W H E RE

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e-S
r IS

is

I

Editorial Comment

I l'~.IP/LJ.

. r. r r. r r. r r rr. r r r. r r r r. r r. r. r

rrrrrrrrr. , c

I

JUST A THOUGHT OR TWO
(From The University of Cincin-
nati "University News"
Voting is one of the most difficultj
functions that the average citizen
is duty bound to fulfill. To vote
intelligently and wisely, so that the
best candidate for office may be
elected is a task that is not. only
difficult, but extremely important.
It is this task that confronts the
students of this university during
the current week.
But in order to vote intelligent-
ly a basis for composition and de-
cision must exist for each individ-
ual voter. In arriving at a fair
decision there are several factors
to be considered. First in import-
ance should be the character of the!
candidates. For positions of trust
and responsibility the quality of
leadership, intelligence, and ability
are essential. Having determined
what qualities we should generally
seek in our representatives; the
next question confronting the voter
is how to determine which of these
various candidates possess these
requirements and the ability to co-
ordinate them to the achievement
of the public weal,
Aside from personal acquaint-
ance, the only accurate means of
judging the various candidates
must, of necessity, be their past
record, or service to the school
during their college career. Admit-
tedly this is not always the-most;
infallible, method, but it is at least
more accurate than either the us-
ual hit-or-miss or partisanship se-)
lection. Past actions and services
constitute a concrete method of
judgment that can hardly be dis-

4
4i
4i
ti
4
4
1
4
ti

4 Days - MAY 22,23,24,25,1929 -6 Concerts
HILL AUDITORIUM - ANN ARBOR

typewriter.
13. (Hurdled for luck.)
14. Am backing Gene
for Head of the Rhetoric
lio.

Tunney
Embrag-

15. Am backing Pussyfoot John-

son for Prexy.
16. Am personally
with Johnny Walker
MacDonald.
17. 'I love pain.
18. I ride horseback
ure.

lb
Ih
it
e.
A

acquainted
and Sandy
for pleas-

but fascinating in its swift, moving
drama. Reporters hard-boiled,
romantic, impervious - chasing,
chasing for Copy to fill yawning
holes, jumping at the blast of the
cityed's voice, scouring the city,
hastily writing fee-ee-tures, turn-
ng in long typewritten reports.
Not the drama in the news, but the
drama back of the front-page
stories-that is the aim of "Report-
er"-sterling in characterization
and frank in its relation-a good
book for the sophisticate.
R. G. S.
APPLICATION IN THE WASTE
BASKET BECAUSE THE JOB IS
OT WHAT IT IS CRACKED UP
rO BE AND I DO NOT WANT TO
'RY OUT STOP-GUMLEY.
* **

FOR MUTUAL BENEFIT - torted or overlooked by glib 19. I know where to find some b
It is a pleasure to note that an tongues or personal prejudice. GOOD joke books.
opportunity was recently given the Upon the successful candidates 20. And last but not least, I am -
assistant secretary of state to dis- of this election will depend the not afraid to print the stuff which A
cuss mutual problems of the United welfare of the undergraduate body has you buffaloed. B
States and Canada with a group of for the ensuing year. Above all let And here, Larkie, are all of those N
representative Canadians meeting us not be swayed in voting by the things which should assure me of
.i Montreal. At that time matters Jmere bald fact that a certain can- the job sans further credentials. T
vital to all concerned including didate is a fellow student in our And, my lad, if you have any en-
questions of the tariff, the St. Law- college-certainly we should choose trails, you'll publish this as a fare-
rence waterway, prohibition, immi- I that man whose ability and record well gesture. I
graticn. and distribu ion of radio'show him to be the person who Oscar (The truth-seeker.)
'w070170 moaivjr +lh-,a C,+*,-nw rfcn dn the mnst for the nniv it . . I

EARL V. MOORE Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK Orchestral Conductor
ERIC DELAMARTER Guest Conductor
JUVA HIGBEE Children's Conductor
Edith Mason Soprano
Chicago Civic Opera Company
Jeannette Vreeland Soprano
Distinguished American Artist
Sophie Braslau Contralto
Metropolitan Opera Company
Marion TelvA Contralto
Metropolitan Opera Company
Richard Crooks Tenor
Premier American Concert Artist
Paul Althouse Tenor
Metropolitan Opera Company
Lawrence Tibbett Baritone
Metropolitan Opera Company
Richard Bonelli Baritone
Chicago Civic Opera Company
Barre Hill Baritone
Chicago Civic Opera Company
William Gustafson Bass
Metropolitan Opera Company
Josef Hofmann Pianist
Polish Virtuoso
Efrem Zimlaist Violinist
Hungarian Master
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
The University Choral Union
Children's Festival Chorus
Samson and Delilah Saint Saens
The New Life Wolf-Ferrari
Pres v 0

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NOTICE

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