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April 30, 1929 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGIR SIX

THE MCI-CAN AILY

_T .5DAY APR TL, . 1929

WOLVERINE

TENNIS

TEAM

DEFEATS

DRAKE

NE TMEN

MICHIGAN, MEN LOSE'
ONLY ONE ENCOUNTER

INDIANA AND PURDUE DROP FROM
RANKS OF UNBEATEN IN BIG TEN

Captain Barton Drops Match
Brody As Mates All Emerge
Victorious

To

SPENCER PLAYED WELL
Losinig only one game to the
strong Drake University net squad,
the Wolverines took their secornd
match of the season by a 5-1 score.
Captain Barton was the only Mich-
igan man to drop his match, being
beaten 6-3, 6-4 by Brody in. the
number one set-to. Brody display-
ed. a wide variety of shots, which,
mixed with some fine returns, were
too much for the Wolf leader, who
was distinctly off form in the
singles match.
Hammer Takes Singles
However, in the doubles with
Hammer as his partner, Barton
showed to much better advantage.
and 'was a distinct factor in the
7-5, 6-2 win which they turned in
over Brody and Everett. In his
singles match, Hammer came ,back
after a poor start in which he lost
the first set, 4-6, to win the next
two 8-6 and 7-5. Both of the last'
two sets were closely contested, as
the score indicates, the Wolverine
number two man showing a hard I
game after the first set was out of
the way. Evertt did not hit the
ball hard, but placed his shots with
great accuracy, as did Brody, and
had developed a powerful service.
nearly always winning on it in the
first two sets. However, in the de-
ciding one, Hammer broke through
with much iliore ease.
Spencer Beats Modeer
Jim Spencer turned in a fine per-
formance in winning his match
from Modeer by a score of 6-2, 6-2.
Although hampered by the high .
wind and slow court, the Michigan
man appeared to be in mid-season.
form, placing his shots well and
showing great speed on his service.
Only four matches were played,
and in the last Bob Beal took a
one sided victory from Mildeer of
Drake with the score 6-2, 6-0. The
Des Moines southpaw could not'
seem to get going, repeatedly play-
ing shots into the net after seem-
ing to have the point made. On
the other hand Beal played consis-
tent tennis, and did not extend
himself at any time during the1
entire match.
Iwn the final doubles contest 'of
the day Spencer and Moore wona
(Continued On Page Seven)

Upsets featured Saturday's base-
ball games in the Big Ten when
Indiana and Purdue each droppedl
from the undefeated class, and1
Wisconsin went into a tie with
Michigan for the Big Ten lead. Chi-
cago turned the tables on Purdue
by downing the Boilermakers, 8-7,1
in an exciting contest, while Wis-
consin opened the season with al
5-1 victory over Indiana.
Fish's home run in the ninth in-
ning with two of his mates on base
gave Chicago its margin of victory
over the Purdue nine. George Lott
of Davis Cup fame was the starting
pitcher for the Maroons, but he
was chased in the fifth inning when
the Boilermakers tallied four runs.
The game marked Purdue's first de-
feat in 10 games this season. t
Wisconsin Looks Good
Farber, Wisconsin pitcher, exhib-
ited a high-class brand of pitching
in his initial Conference game of
the season, limiting the Hoosiers to
three hits. Paugh, veteran Indiana
hurler, was found for 12 hits by the
Cardinal batters. Wisconsin gave
evidence that it must be figured as
a strong competitor in the Big Ten
diamond race, as the Badgers com-
bined perfect fielding with good
pitching and batting. Five Indiana
errors aided the Wisconsin cause.
Illinois gained revenge on Ohio
State by defeating the Buckeyes,
6-2, at Columbus. Capt. Don An-
drews scattered Ohio's eight. hits
effectively, shutting out the opposi-
tion after the first inning. The Il-
lini drove Kermode, Buckeye pitch-
er, to the showers in the fifth in-
ning, when they scored four runs.
Ohio commited three errors.
Iowa Beats Wildcats
With two wins over Illinois to
their credit, Northwestern's Wild-
cats fell before Iowa, 7-3, in 10 in-
nings. After a pitchers' battle be-
tween Heideman of Northwestern,

(and Carlson and Twogood of Iowa,
the former weakened in the tenth,
when five hits and an error gave
the Hawkeyes four runs. It was
Iowa's first Big Ten victory. The
Hawkeyes gathered 14 hits, while
INorthwestern made five errors.-
Sahs led Iowa at bat withethree',
hits.
I Cancellation of the Minnesota
game last week left Michigan with-
out a Big Ten contest until May 11,
when the Illini will come to Ferry
field. In the meantime Colgate
and Meiji university will provide
the Wolverine opposition. Thus
Michigan is assured of first place
for at least 10 days more. Wiscon-
I sin is carded to play Illinois this
Saturday.
'CLOSE GAME GOS, T
'S. LUSI DER T
Yesterday's activities in the
American League found Detroit on
the wrong end of a 3 to 2 score that
came only after ten innings of
baseball had been played at Navin
. Field. Gray held the mound posi-
- tion while Vic Sorrell did thei
twirling for the neighboring city.
Pounding out a couple of homers
in the third inning and pulling a
coup of five runs in the eight gave
the Athletics an impressive 10 to 1
victory over the Yankees. Haas and
Simons were responsible for the
'homers. In the other contest
staged, Chicago beat Cleveland 13
to 4 while Washington and Boston
were on the rest list.
Only two games were played in
the National circuit. Chicago took
the toll from Cincinnati Red Six;
with the final count standing 4 to
3. The Windy City ball team gar-
nered 13 hits to 9 for the Reds. St.
Louis defeated Pittsburgh 7 to 3.

i

PSHAKEYES TOO
OVER MICHGA
I With a trio of stars, Gordon, Can-
by, and Forwald, leading a well
Occidental Coach Stops On Return balanced group of performers in
Trip From Penn Relays To the field events, Coach Bresnahan's
Aid Coach Wieman Iowa proteges will hold a slight1
edge over the Michigan entrants in
PLAYED ON BELOIT TtAM he shot put, broad jump, high
.Q 1 jump, and pole vault when the
Hawkeyes engage the Wolverines at,
Joe Pal foontall and track Ferry field this Saturday in the first
coach at Occidental College of Lose ua meet of the outdoor season
Angeles, California, and former1or the Maize andeut ea
coach of the Oregon Aggics, assist- f Wolves Favored In Hammer
ed Coach Elton E. "Tad" Wieman On the basis of past performan-I
in instructing the Varsity football ces, the Wolverines appear sure of!
candidates in a lateral pa drill a majority of points in one event,
on Ferry field yesterday. He will the hammer throw, where Captain
remain for today's practice session Ketz and Williams will compete for
also, when he - will again instruct Michigan against two mediocre
the men in this department of play. Hawkeyes, MacMahon and Gil-
Pipal is stopping in Ann Arbor christ. Ketz, 1928 Conference
on his return trip from Philadel- champion, showed himself back in
phia, where his track team com- form when he broke the Drake re-
peted in the Penn Relays which lay record by over two feet with a'
were held last week. He is one of heave of 157 feet eight inches Sat-
the country's foremost experts on urday, while Williams took fourth
the subject of the lateral pass, hav- with a toss of nearly 130 feet, far
ing been . instrumental in its de- '
velopment on the Pacific Coast. Hej
popularized the lateral pass in!
rugby, and when it become a legal,
football play Pipal came into his!
own as a successful coach of the,
popular grid sport. He has beenj
highly recommended by both Knute I-_
Rockne- and Alonzo St gg, and
toured the country last year giv- (Special To The Daiy)
ing instructions in the lateral pass The collegiate baseball title of In-
at Columbia, Harvard, Ohio State, diana may be settled unofficially
and the Superior Coaching School this afternoon when the Hoosiers
in Wisconsin. play the Irish at South Bend. In-
Pipal was a star on the Beloit diana recently occupied top place
college team that played Michigan in the Westeern Conference stand-
during Fielding H. Yost's first year jing, while Notre Dame boasts a ca-
as coach of the Wolverine football pable team of veterans.

,1

LD SLIGHT EDGE I WU NVILf itRm
N IN FIELD EVENTS
better than either of the two
Iowans have done. -
Hawkeye Broadjumpers Good Freese's Spike Wound. Keeps Mile
The broad jump, high jump, and'Relay Team Idle; Chapman
pole vault seem almost as certain Is Unable To lump
to -go to the Hawkeyes, howevfr. In
Gordon, lanky Olympic broad jump- KETZ SETS NEW RECORD
er, Coach Bresnahan has a Drake
relay champion who has a mark of!Toijre rvne lei
nearly 25 feet, while Wilcox, an- Two injuries prevented Michi-
other Iowan, has done 22 feet, six; gan's track entrants in the Drake
inches. Chapman, foremost Mich- relays from further distinguishing
igan entrant in this event, may themselves. Dick Chapman suffer-
spring a surprise, as he has cleared ed an injury in the warming up
24 feet in practice. practice for the broad jump and
Gordon may attempt to add to did not compete at all in this event
his laurels by doubling in the high while a spike wound received by
ump, in which cated for first ando-Freese while the mile relay team
sveond. efrmslatedfrfrs edsiwas qualifying prevented the
second. The former jumped six Maize and Blue quartet from enter-
feet, three nches last year, while ing the finals.
forkhoven took second at the A measure - of success greeted
Drake relaps with a leap of five most of the entrants at the Des
feet, 11 inches under adverse Moines event. Ketz's performance
weather conditions. in the hammer throw was especial-
Have Two High Jumpers fly brilliant since the Wolverine
Felker, who will carry the Maize captain set a new Drake relay
and Blue colors in this event, tied mark of 157 feet 8 2-5 inches,
for first in the Conference indoor breaking the former mark of 155
meet at Iowa City, and has cleared feet 6 inches set back in 1927 by
over six feet outdoors. If Gordon ! Gwynn of Pittsburgh.
does not enter the high jump, the Michigan's relay teams also were
Wolverine should stand an even partly successful in their quest for
(Continued On Page Seven) (Continued On Page Seven)

t"

- I TIlin iii juinirn inunr n

team. In that game Michigan
swarmed all over the Beloit team,
swamping them by a score of 89 to
0. The reverse, however, was no
reflection on, Pipal's abiltiy.
o --

Last year, in the final game of
the season, Notre Dame defeated
Indiana in a close contest. The
same players who were responsible
for the defeat will be in the Irish
lineup again tomorrow. Among the
celebrities on the 'Notre Dame
squad are: Walsh, brother of Ed
Walsh, of. White Sox fame; Lordi,
(Continued On Page Seven)

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ATHLETICS FOR THE WEEK
Thursday
Baseball-Colgate, here.
Tennis-Colgate, here.

Friday
Baseball-Colgate, here.
Saturday
Track-Iowa, here.
Baseball-Western State
Kalamazoo.
Golf-Illinois at Urbana.

a

-o
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AMERICAN LEAGUE
R H
New York ....100 000 000- 1 6
Athletics ......004 100 5x-10 8
Johnson and Rhodes; Walberg.
St. Louis . . . .000 101 000 1-3 9
I Detroit ......100 000 010 0-2 9
1 Gray; Sorrell.
Cleveland . ....020 010 001- 4 13
j Chicago ......400 130 23x-13 14
o (Continued On Page Seven)

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FRATERNITY ATHLETIC
MANAGERSj
It is absolutely necessary that
the first round matchs in ten-
nis and horseshoes be played im-
mediately. Get in touch with
the team you are scheduletl to
play and finish your first round
match at once. The department1
requests that you send a list of
the men playing on these two
teams, with class and initials,
into the office. It will help the
records considerably if this is
done at once. ~
Intramural Department.

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Summer

Employment

A New York Corp. can place a
few (Freshmen and Sophomores)
men applicants in summer posi-
tions; $21 weekly salary, full trans-
portation and opportunity to earn
$260.00 bonus at end of summer.
Apply National Organizer, (Tues-
day only.)-Allenel Hotel,2-5 and
8 to 10 p. m.

at

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- I
M/I!

.....

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ill. Ill1111.P,/«/. lllllJl. 'll./.

Buy a Good
Topcoat
Now
20%
ott

Colorful

-"

Spring
Haberdashery
The fashions of Spring demand the lavish
use of col r in men's apparel.

ow

'29

s24

'28'
We are closing out every
coat in our stock, they are
camel hairs, and tweeds,
hand tailored, 50 inches
long, and shower-proof.
Truly remarkable
values
They had to be good to sell
125 of them this spring.

brili
- othe c
larity
Shirts
Colored shirts in the newer
shades are shown in a variety
of weaves and patterns.
Even
ates f
in nea
attrac

Neck wear
s in various shades, pastel or
ant. New small figures and
onventional stripes share popu-
with plain colors.
}n
mported Half Hose
in half hose color predomin-

or spring.

Saxony lisle woven

w and unusual designs are very

Jive.

I

II _., ., ,,, I

11

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