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April 21, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH14E. Ml C 14 1CHA 9,D A ILY

SUN AY, APRIL 21, 1929.

JACK --ASSST UDENTS
TO WHITE IN CONTEST
Announces Rules For Competition
In Novel Writing To
Rhetoric Classes

NEWSPAPER WORK]
OF MATERIAL G

Although not intending to di-
rectly sponsor the contest, the'
rhetoric department yesterday an-
nounced to classes in Rhetoric 2
and 32 the plans and rules of the
College -Humor-Doubleday, Doran
prize novel contest which is being
conducted by the publishers of Col--
lege Humor and the Doubleday,
Doran Co.
According to the notice received
by Professor P. M. Jack, head of the
department, from the contest of-
fices, the novel "must be a story of
youth seen through the eyes of its
own generation," and should range
in length from 75,000 to 100,000,
words. The contest, which will
close midnight, October 15, 1929, is
open to all undergraduates and to
graduates of not more than one
year. A prize of $3,000 is offered
for the best story submitted, while
the publishers reserve the right to
use any of the novels entered ac-
cording to their usual terms of
publication.
:Prof. Jack believes that this con-
test will prove of interest to many
students who have been working on
long narrative.1

(Continued From Page One)
Mr. Gilmore was queried in regard
to the lucrative returns from the
profession. He replied, "If a young
man wants to make money, then
most assuredly I would advise him
to stay out of journalism. You;
can't make a lot of money here.
Oh, I wouldn't have you believe
that you aren't paid anything-I
believe it pays better than teach-
ing or preaching-but if a young
man puts material acquisition
ahead of everything else, he would
make a mistake by going into jour-
nalism."
When asked why capable writers
on metropolitan journals did -not
turn to syndicate writing in order
to increase their earning, Mr. Gil-
mnore said that syndicate writing
requires one to write for perhaps
80 newspapers in as many different
parts of the countfy, with as many
editorial policies, and appealing
perhaps to as many different clas-
ses of people.
"There are very few men capable
of writing material which would be
interesting to all," he said, "and
even these hesitate, about assuming
such a great responsibility. They
would sooner work on a metropoli-
tan daily for a lesser salary. It's
the 'love of the game."
"Would you advise a young jour-'
nalistic student to specialize in ones
type Qf writing at school or wait

LACKS PROMISE
AINS, EDITOR SAYS
until he gets into actual work," he
was asked.g
"Perhaps I can answer that," he
replied, "by telling you how men
are weeded out here for different
types of work. When a reporter
first comes here, lie is sent out on
all possible types of work, the re-
sults are noted, and if he shows
marked proficiency in any one line
he is allowed to drift in that direc-
tion until he reaches the point
where that is the only type of work
he does. In this way court repor-
ters, political writers and the like
are selected. At this time, I might
mention, too, that there are al-
ways a few women reporters on the,
paper, though their opportunity is
necessarily not so great."
Mr. Gilmore briefly sketched!
what he termed an ideal journal-I
istic program after graduation. He
said, "I would get on the staff of a
local paper of a city of about 10,000
people and stay there for about a
year. Then I would connect myself
with a newspaper in a city of
100;000 for another year, it being
understood of course,! that these
papers are under the management
of capable and energetic editors.
After these two years of what
might be termed "interneship" a,
young man would be fully prepared
to work on the newspaper of a large
city, and his two years of practical
background would stand him in
good stead."
LafayetteA A
at Shelby IT AV

SCREEN
REFLECTIONS
At The Majestic
Originally banned by Czar Will
Hayes as too delicate a story for
the films to depict, Michael Arlen's
"The Green Hat" finally found its
way into motion pictures as "A
Woman of Affairs" with none other
than the old burn-em-up combina-
tion of John Gilbert and Greta
Garbo in the featured roles.
The result on view at the Majes-
tic is decidedly entertaining. Al-
though slightly toned down from
the original Arlen plot, the story
moves swiftly and is defly handled
under the excellent direction of
Clarence Brown.
Whether La Garbo particularly
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admitted that she gives an excel-
lent performance in a role which
fits her well. Gilbert and the rest
of an unusually capable cast like-
wise contribute much to the success
of the picture. Fortunately lack-
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Woman of Affairs" is well-worth
seeing.
One-of Miss Garbo's companion
screen stars from across the sea,
Greta Nissen, is making eyes at
Detroit's hard working business
men this week at the Fox in a playa
let titled "The She and the Sheik"
with James Rennie of legit fame.
B. J.A.

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FOX NEWS
MICHIGAN ORCHESTRA
Directed by Karl Wieborhold
BOB HOWLAND

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