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April 04, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

--2~-,

THE MICHIU 3~L

_. . .
...

TEMPORARY SHELTER IS HOUSING
AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING WORK

- :

"HARLEM" OPENS CAMP DAVIS TO BE HELD OUTSIDE
SOON IN DETROIT STATE THIS YEAR FOR FIRST TIME

PROPOS fl BUILDINGS MUST
HAVE . PROPER HEAT
AND LIGHT
PLANT RUN TO CAPACITY
B"lse's Overloaded .250 Per Cent
During Rigorous Conditions
Of Past Winter
Buildings without heat and light
are unusable and the present build-
.ings of the University of. Michiga
have arrived at the very limit of
the ability of the present power
Plant to supply heat and light, no
matter whether the present Legis-
jature adds to our building space
or not. During the present winter
of 1928-1929 it has been. necessary
for considerable periods to run the
lhrgest boilers at more than 250
per cent of their rating. Such over-
ldading may take place occasional-,
41 but it cannot continue indefi-
nitely.
It is not the part of wisdom to
run.the plant without a wider mar-
gin between normal daily demands
and limit capacity. Even if the
present Legislature adds no Uni-
versity buildings, within the next
two .years..our Power Plant will be
called upon to carry the Elemen-
tary Shool for which an appro-
priationm has been made, a large
dormitory, for women, and the
great Legal Research Building and
an addition to. the Lawyers Club
dormitory to be erected and pres-
ented to the State by a distinguish-
ed alumnus.of the University resid-
ing in New. York.-
The situation.can be shown from
another ppint of view. In 1922 the
University; had approximately 24.-
500,000 cubical feet contents in its
buildings. At that time it had ap-
proximately 4,200 boiler horse-
power in .its heating plant. Today,
without reference to the buildings
in immediate prospect as listed
above, the cubical feet contents of i
the University buildings are, 56,-
500,000 while the boiler horsepower
has increased to 6,200. Thus while
the space. to- be heated has in-
creased approximately 130 per cent
th, boiler capacity has increased
on4y1 about.47.6 per-cent and-mean-
while ten of the twelve boilers now
in, the heating plant have been
growing older and less efficient.
We believe it is obvious that this
condition, cannot be left to itself;
something must be done.
To remedy the situation, requests
for the biennium include the pur-
chase and installation of a boiler
of 1,000 horsepower, to be set up on
a foundation provided when the
Power House was enlarged; the
purchase andinstallation of an ad- I
ditional 2,000 kilowatt generator,
the provision of tunnels carrying
power plant service to new build-
ings replacement of worn out or
otherwise inadequate mains for

A new stirring play of the Black For the first time in its history,
Belt written by William Jourdan running over a period of 55 years,
Rapp and Wallace Thurman, the forthcoming session at Camp
which is the reigning sensation Davis, the annual summer camp
now in New York, will be seen at for students taking the surveying
the Shubert-Lafayette theatre, De- course, will be conducted beyond
tART FNLARGEMENF' troit, opening Sunday night, April;the boundaries of the state of
trpnn ndy gtApI Michigan. The University has pur
high and low pressure steam and: 7 and goes direct to Chicago for chased a new camp site within
for electric current, and the pro- an all-summer run. easy driving distance of Yellow-
vision of an outdoor lighting sys- "Harlem" is the most consummate stone Park and the Jackson Hole
tern for the Campus in general. The effort yet made to portray the region in northwestern Wyoming.
details are .too complicated to in- seething humanity in that section The camp, located at Jackson, Wyo.,
elude in a booklet of this scope but of New York that is known as the will succeed that one which has
they have been prepared and the: Black Belt, and all previous efforts heretofore been conducted at Doug-
estimates have been made by com- to tell of that exotic, tragi-comic las Lake in the northern part 6f
petent engineers. It is clear to', people in the region north of 125th Michigan.
anyone, .however, that an econom- street, New York, pale into signifi- The new camp site is surrounded
ical heating and lighting system cance beside this masterly play by public lands. The University
necessitates the continued use of "Harlem". The cast of "Harlem" lands and contiguous areas ae
low pressure steam as a by-product contains over 60 players and is one open and the site has been selected
provided by running steam through of the biggest dramatic companies i because all natural conditions are
a generator for the production of: _ever seen in Detroit. The scenic more favorable to field work in sur-
required electric current, and on investiture is realistic and colorful veying. While there are trees on
the, basis of this fact the whole SCIENTIST HELPS HOUSE IMPROVES. and exact reproductions of the 10- the mountain slopes, the growth of
body of the Power Plant requests N NDA SURVEY AFTER P cale in which the play is given. timber and brush will not interfere
for the. present biennium hang to- I IDA S R Y, Fii TION. , The authors of "Harlem" have with surveying opeations. ield
gether as a unit, namely, additional woven an intense, emotion-stirring' work will thus be greatly improved
boilers, electric generators, and dis- Dr. Carl E. Guthe, associate di- NEW YORK, April 3.-Col. Ed- tale, revealing both the comic, and because a project can be outlined
tribution provision for the' steam rector of the Museum of Anthropol- ward M. House, 70 years old, ad- dramatic side of the greatest col- which will involve practically all of
and current. ogy, has returned from Pennsy- 'viser to President.Wil , e' ored- community in the civilized the practice work tht has nees-
Engineering Laboratories and vania where he was called to aid in Pr, son, was rest world, a story of a colored family sarily been disconnected and separ-
.Research 'the preliminary work of establish-. ing comfortably today in a privatel that migrates to Harlem from Vir- ated at the Michigan camps due to
Under this head the sum of ing an organiation to be known as hospital after undergoing an.oper- ginia in search of refuge and hap- the growths of trees and brush.
$00,000. is requested to build two the Pennsylvania Archaeological ation for the removal of a tumor on piness, only to find themselves sur- In addition to being able to re-
additions (following plans made Society. his bladder. His condition was de- rounded by a new and difficult ceive better instruction at the new
long ago) to the present West En-1 Dr. Guthe consulted with a num- scribed as very good. world. camp, students will also be able to
gineering Building, thereby pro- ber of authorities at Wilkes Barre -_--
viding much needed room for in-I and made an address before the lFrP_ n
struction in Automobile, Electrical, convention on "The Hidden Story01"

see some of the finest scenery the
country affords and to inspect some
"remarkable engineering works.
In order that plans may soon be
made for the accommodation of
students who plan to attend the
new camp, they are requested to in-
terview Professor McFarlan, room
207, West Engineering building, as
soon as possible. He will be able to
give information relative to trais-
portation, costs, and loan funds.
Information Bureaux
Provided By Alumni
Members of the University of
Michigan club of Rochester are co-
operating with other college grad-
uates of that city to provide a bu-
reau of' information for prospec-
tive college students, according to
dispatches received by °r. Hawley'
Tapping, yesterday.
The purpose is to have the vari-
ous represenitatives organize and
arrange a program for the high
school students to include intro-
ductory talks on college work in
general,' entrance requirenients,
scholarship, and living expenses.
These, t4ks are to be followed by
presentation of exhibits from vari-
ous universities and c o 116 ege s
throughout the country.

and Civil Engineering, Engineering
IMechanics, and the Department of I
Engineering Research.
Automobile Engineering-a new
subject since the West Engineering
Building was erected-has been
housed in makeshift quarters ever.
since it was first taught here. It
now occupies a temporary and un-I
sightly wooden building. Surely
this department, which has been,
brought to a high stage of efficien-
-cy by Professor W. E. Lay,. merits
proper housing in the University
of the State that leads in. automo-
bile manufacture.I
Civil and Electrical Engineering,
and Engineering Mechanics, have.
had 'no chance to expand their
laboratories since the present West 3
Engineering. Building was erected
in 1906. These departments could
not be benefited by the opening of
the East Engineering Building,a
which is fully occupied by Chemical
and Aeronautical Engineering and
the Shops.
Wer Try to
ATI
ANN ARBOR RESTAURANT
MICHIGAMMdEI

of the Indian." The Pennsylvania
Indian survey,' an organization
studying the archaeology of the
state, is arranging for a program
which will insure Indian history of
Pennsylvania b e i n g completely
covered.
After leaving Wilkes Barre, Dr.
Guthe visited the University mu-
seum of the University of Pennsyl-
vania at Philadelphia where ;he
conferred with officials of that in-
stitution. On his return trip he
stopped off at Lancaster, Penn., to
examine what is believed to be the'
finest collection of Indian pottery
in Pennsylvania. I
The Michigan archaelogist is con-
fident that the proposed expansion
program in Pennsylvania will be a
complete success, due to the en-i
thusiasm manifested by the Penn-
sylvania archaelogists at the recent
meeting.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
$2.25 for the half year. u
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