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March 30, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Fi 1I~tfMITY OASFRIIATDRY

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Architects Offer Plan For Observatory
To House Gigantic Reflecting Telescope

Luu tm UILIUWI! WUtLIIVFUIUIEU
ABE GONSIBERlEDMOST VlIALAMONG
RlEQUESTS RNOW BEFORE LEWlSLATURE.

ned, however, would be the second acres of land inside the city limits its present unsuitable
in size in the country. The other of Ann Arbor, worth certaily more gain in valuable built
obstacle is the most serious and one ; than the $260,000 of this request. immediately more th;
than can be overcome in only one There is in the first place the pres- amount of the propo.
way, by moving the Observatory to ent Observatory site of four acres ation.
a new location outside of the city to the purchase of which in 18541 The State has alwa
of Ann Arbor. The present build- Hon. Henry N. Walker, Senator I the astronomical wor
ing is now surrounded by the Uni- Zachariah Chandler, General Lewis not fail to do so in th
versity Hospital and other struc- Cass, and Governor Henry P. Bald- sis.
tunes of the University and the win contributed. Besides this, Mr.
city; smoke by day and the city Robert P. Lamont, of Chicago, an MICHIGAN GAME I
lights by night fatally hamper ac- alumnus and a generous benefactor A recent report of t
curate observation, and the jar of the University. has held for tion department in
caused by nearby passing trains and some time for the use of the Ob- Michigan is well stock
street traffic puts delicate scientific I servatory 26 acres to the east of and that the danger 01
Work out of the question. It would Observatory avenue, adjoining the tion is negligible. T)
be useless to put new equipment in Hospital grounds, and on two ad- I cording to the report
the present building; it could not be ditional acres has allowed Universi- of refuges or preserves
used to advantage if we did. t ty buildings to be erected, with the ing is forbidden. In
is therefore imperative to move into I expectation that the needs of the this, there is a state
the country where observation will Observatory would otherwise be of 31,500 acres which
again be possible. ! met by the Regents. All this land as public hunting gro
If the Observatory is moved, as Mr. Lamont will deed to the Uni-
proposed, the University will at once versity for its unrestricted use, once Subscribe to The Mi
acquire free of all restriction 32 the Observatory is removed from '$2.25 for the half yea

v

INSTITUTION, ESTABLISHED
1854, PROVES TO BE
VALUABLE

IN

NEW BUILDINGS PLANNED
Present Equipment Is Inadequate
For Carrying On'Modern
Research Work,
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second
of a series of articles presenting the plans.
for the utilization of funds to be obtained
from the legislature under the expansion
program.
The needs of the Observatory
have been placed first among the
University's requests because they
are so vital, because they have been
neglected so long, and because the
Observatory since its founding in
1854, just seventy-five years ago,j
has deserved so well of the Uni-
versity and the State.
Raymond Poincare, the great
French scientist, has said that if
the heavens were permanently ob-
scured to us by clouds, we human
beings would still be in a state of
superstition. In the official de-
scription of the great Canadian Na-
tional Observatory at Victoria, B.
C., the statement is made that the
degree of culture of any commun-
ity can be measured by that com-
munity's interest in astronomy. The
.truth of these observations, if one
reflects on them, is compelling.
They answer the thoughtless ob-
jections that are sometimes made
to astronomy as being impractical
and useless, and explain why it is
given so:prominent a place by ev-;
ery university of every nation.
Observatory Places Many Men
Our own Observatory has turned
out no less than 45 professional as-
tronomers and .17 directors of ob-
servatories. Francis Brunnow, J.
Dealer in
ANTIQUES
Upholstering, Furniture
Repairing, Refinishing
and Remodeling
218 East Huron Street
'Ann Arbor ----- Michigan
Phone 3432

. Watson, and Asaph Hall made it
famous by their discoveries. Pres- _
ident W. W. Campbell of the Uni-
versity of California was trained
there. The late Professor W. J. Hus-
sey was a noted organizer of as-
tronomical work and builder of p
telescopes -and mountings.
The unit which is now asked for
consists of a telescope building, with
a modern reflecting telescope of 75
itch aperture, and a residence for w
the keeper .and observing staff, the
whole estimated to cost $260,000
equipped. It would be located on__
land now partly acquired by the of the department. of facilities and location. The pres-
University about fifteen miles from Present Equipment Antiquated ent telescope has been a (good one
Ann Arbor near Portage Lake on It is wholly impossible to carry in its day, but is now gratly out-
the Lansing highway. The struc- on, in the present Observatory, the distanced by the modern' instru-
tures themselves, as illustrated, scientific work meeting modern I ments at Harvard, Mt. Wilson, Ohio
would be unpretentious but sub- standards and upholding the past Wesleyan, and Victoria, B C., and
stantial and fire-proof, and suffic- reputation of Michigan's astrono- its field is practically worked out.
ient for the present pressing needs mers because of two factors, lack The 75 inch reflector which is plan-

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111
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EN ROUTE
YOU NEED SAFE AND CASHABLE CURRENCY
Traveling here or abroad plenty of money is needed at every step
and it must be their proof and easily negotiable by only yourself
Either of the following:
Letters of Credit
American Express Travelers' Cheques
American Bankers Association Travelers' Checks

i

can be used.

Let us advise you which is the most con-

venient for your particular needs.
You>ll need them this Spring Vacation.

ANN ARBOR SAVINGS BANK

101 N. Main St.

707 N. University Ave.

' w

..

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Sch popularity must
be deserved!

Down deep in the Kongo the native sons
believe that anybody who has an explorer for
dinner will absorb all the brains, courage
and other success.assuring virtues of the unfor-
tunate victim.
We wish we could say thesame of Chesterfields
-that all their popularity is conferred upon
whosoever smokes them. Frankly, however,
this is not invariably true. Several Chesterfield

smokers have recently been discovered who
are not ambassadors, steel kings, or even bank
presidents.
But--since Chesterfields are so satisfying, mild
and different-we'll all of us continue to enjoy
them for these sound smoke-virtues alone.
Popularity? Six million smokers are enjoying
'em today. Such popularity must be deserved.
i Make it six million and one?

IT

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