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March 27, 1929 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-03-27

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' F0UU

Pablished every
dung the Univers
Control of Student
Member of We
Association.
The Assqciated
titled to the use fo
'dispatches credited
credited in this pap
lished herein.
Rntered at the
Michigan, is seconi
of postag granted
roaster General,
Subscription by
Offices: Ann A
mard Street.
Phones: Editor
EDITO
Tele
MANA
KENNE'
Editor'............
fatty Editor...
News Editor.....
Sports Editor..
Women's Editor..
Telegraph Editor. ,
Music and -Drama
Assistant City Ed
b oseph E. Howell
penald J. Kline
Lawrence R. Klein
Geo
Paul L. Adams
Morris 'Alexandel
C. A. Askren
Bertram Askwil'i.
Louise Behyme
Arthur Bernstew
Seton C. Bovee
Isabel Charles
T R. ('hnhb
Frank E. Cooper
Relen Domine
Margaret Eckels
Douglas Edwards
Valborg Egeland
Robert J. Feldman
Marjorie Follmer
William Gentry
Ruth Geddes
David B. Hempstea
Richard Jng
Charles R.Kaufjn
Ruth Kelsey
BUSy
Tele
BU SIN
ED'W
Assistant Manage
Depar
Advertising.D..a
Advertising......
Advertising..
Service..........
Circulation.....
Accounts.......
Publications......
Mary Chase
f, anette Dale
ernor Davis
Bessie Egeland
Sally Faster
Anna Goldberg
Kasper Halverson-
George Hamilton
ack Horwich
ia Humphrey
Night Editor-P
WEDNESDA

_HE_ MICHIG3AN D AILY WEDNESEAY, !AN
humane treatment of all who came ROLL i - And iirama d ri JN-tliiltIiimwJ
Smorning except Monday within its borders. In this respect D S
ity year by the Board in
Publications. Paul Revere did his bit for human-
ster Conference Editorial ity by helping to free them from LAMENT: TONIGHT: Mimes offer "In The
oppression of a political nature. LARK LACKS Next Room" by Harret Ford and
Press is exclusively en- A modern Paul Revere, in the L LAEKS Next b
o" republication of ,all news LISSMENESSElEdwrrdoHoCaBelmt,
I to it or not otherwise person of Edward H. Calvin, a Red Mimes Teatre, beginning at 8:15
per and the local news pub. Cross worker, substituted an auto- Is there a little subpoena in your ,
mobile for the horse, and drove on house? No home can be really oclock. O n.S tate Stree tM ain
d class matter. Special rate his journey for humanity ahead of complete without one, avers the in- I" THE NEXT ROOM"
i by Third Assistant Post- the surging waters of a flood. Rid- vitations committee of S. D. X.
carrier, $4.00; by wail, ing before the crest of water, he (Silly Dashed Xylophoners) pro- A Review by Paul L. Adams o eeor
rbor Press Building, May- traveled through the Apalachicola fessional journalistic fraternity, the "In the Next Room" is an ex- a
al, 495; Business, 21 4. valley in Florida to warn the in- members of which earn their name tremely entertaining and thrilling
-, habitants of the approaching flood, by the tintinabulation of their mystery play cleverly compounded SeS
and telling them to seek higher tpewriters. from all the stock types and situa-
RIAL STAFF ground for protection. * ** tions which have made such plays
phone4IO 'Perhaps the ride was not as sen- Which leads us to a riddle (and a popular in the past. = L
,GING EDITOR sational as the original, nor will it cut, thank the Holies): If a type- Its production last evening was The particular person ma be distinguished
TH G. PATRICK be remembered so long in history, writer tintinabulates like a bell, remarkable for the general excel-p
.Nlon3. mhbut it was truly an act for the good and a xylophone sizzles like a lence of the cast. Dick Kurvink =
..... . Stewart Hooker of humanity from "one who loves zither, what is the difference be- was undoubtedly outstanding, and .by the clothes he wears and the condition
......R chard C.QKuvinn his fellow men", and for that rea- tween a typewriter and a xylophone has, through his work, achieved a -
Ge.:..yvirS.stone son, if for no other, it is most cer- player, and why? position on the campus as an actor they are in. He is very critical about comfort
....R. . Askren tainly worthy of note. * * 'which is probably unoccupied by
itor.........Robert Silbar 'You will find the answer in the anyone else; but those who sup-
ight Editors Illinois' Dickinson says Wiscon- inch below: ported him were also eminently
Charles S. Monroe sin won the conference basketball capable. The role played by Dick
George .Simon race instead of Michigan. Too bad Kurvink was extremely difficult, his laundry. He wants smooth es onhis
rge C. Tilley those two couldn't have gotten to- and this reviewer regrets that he
Reporters gether! -cannot dwell on all the fine pointssu
Donald EA. Layn of his performance; but certainly
Marian McDonald We see by the headlines that the his make-up, voice and facial con-
HnQaiferr receives at The Varsity.-
Eliabeth awseasarestillfree:R"GLtham Greets trol, and his delicate care to give rciv!atTctor y
tJosephA. Ruasse Hero Fried After Rescue. everything in the character just
Anne Schell - the proper stress, should be men-
Rachel Shearer teresehlbm
Howard Simon mpus piontioned.
IobOpiL.ion sKenneth S.White in the old bb
Ruth Steadman Contributors are asked to be brief, I .-"- - _ Kneh S. Wiei h l
Cadwell Swanson confinngbthemselves toless thanb300-comedy role of the butler, did an
Jane Thayer words if possible. Anonymous cor- excellent bit of work, as did Wil- _
Edith Thomas munications will be disregarded. The - ---«
Beth Valentine names of communicants wl, howeveriam R. Day in the time worn role 1
Grney Williams be regarded as confidenitial uont reb And if you think you're not get- of the dumb detective, a part he -
d Jr. Wal"ter Wilds quest. l etters published should nt be tnIofhedm dtcivaprhet
George E. Wohlgemuth construed as expressing the editorial ting your money's worth in this does in a new manner.O4
a Edward L .Warner Jr. opinion of teDaily- .morning's column, pausetocon- Norman D. Brown was the only-
Cleland Wyllie . sider the fact that the above cut Nrmn D Brow was th dny-
NESS STAFF UNNECESSARY OFFICIOUSNESS does double duty. pedisappoin the cast who was a' dis-
*NS TF * tictdiappointment, especially in }}_
phone 21214 To the Editor:.1 the opening scenes. As the young, =
This, it seems, is just the relation It a~'so substitutes for a enthusiastic but bashful journal-'
ESS MA AGEE of another incident, typical, as crack about who's getting the ist, he was wooden and unconvinc-
shown on previous occasions, of oil can at the grid banquet next ing, but in the last two acts did
r-RAYMOND WACTER the discourtesy of the officers em- week. better with the part.
plobetterth withrsthetopart.ce-
tment Managerse by te University to enorce George W. Priehs certainly de-
SAlex K. Scherer the automobile ban. "This year's grid-ron banquet serves mention for a fine perfor- =1E
. a .r aesJeo r On Friday night, a party of sev- must be novel in all particulars," mance, as does Eugenie Chapel
G.,. Ierbert E. Varnum eral students, with their guests decreed the general chairman. who was good on the whole al-
.. Lawrence E. Walkley from Detroit, were driving away And even so: though there were moments when
Ray M. Hofelich from a fraternity dance, the car Just think how you're paying she was lacking in adequate emo-
iestrranta being operated by a Detroit girl three bucks, (24 bits, 100 tional quality. Others in the cast
Lillian Kek who is not a student at the Uni- nickels) for the privilege of re- who did extremely well were Jo-
Bernard Iarsons versity. ceiving a subpoena, instead of sephin Rankin, Helen Carrm, and
!liu N ollister Mabley vriy . Y
1. A. Newman Suddenly the shrill blast of a being paid a silver dollar to Dave Hempstead, Jr.
ck R Schemm siren was heard, which meant, of take it. Aside from the acting, and from
Sherwood Upton course, to pull up to the curb. The the entertaining qualities of the
Marie Welistead door was jerked open by an officer This is not only novel, but dis- play, it should also be recommended
'ERCE ROSENBERG who, in the courteous manner of tinctly naive, not to say nutty. for the sets. The one used in the - Liberty at Fifth
the University Police, shouted: * * first'act is remarkable for its at-
tY, MARCH 27,.1929 "How many are drunk in here?" "The charge is really very mod- mosphere .and the suggestion of
It seems as though this is carry- rate," asserted the banquet chair- breadth-it- gives to the room I ., --_ _
gn things a bit too iar To stop a man"eebrtiisnmeea1. l mm M®a _ ® ®___ __

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THE DAILY RESTSt
The Daily's stand on the senior
class dues in the literary school
bhas been stated with emphasis. For
a single'day The Daily is content
simply to reiterate its former state-
ments and demands. On this day
it is hoped that those officers of
the senior class in whom the power
is so evidently and even conspicu-
ously vested will formulate some
worthy action to correct the situa-
tion.
Tomorrow morning if such a plan
is not forthcoming The Daily will
resume its campaign with new fire
and emphasis. The situation must
be corrected. How about some ac-
tion?
0
WHY THE GRID BANQUET?
Speaking of local and national
dignitaries with the familiarity
which would almost lead one to
think they were popular members
of the student body seem to be one
of the characteristics of the Grid-
iron banquet. By some this is re-
ceived with a shock, as being a de-
grading influence on dignity. But
it has its good points.
The affair sponsored by Sigma
Delta Chi was originated for the
sole purpose of "razzing" anyone
who might attend, regardless of his
position, and the tradition has been
carried on without very great h&rm.
to anyone. In fact it has been her-
alded as a time when students
could meet professors, and average
citizens could meet great states-
men on the same level. That such
an opportunity has the favor of all
included is -shown by an acceptance
to the coming banquet sent by Sen-
ator James Couzens, who said, "The
fact that dignity, place and rank
are to be forgotten in a spirit of
good-fellowship appeals to me im-
mensely."
No one who has attended has
ever suffered a complete loss of
dignity. With such men present as
those' who are usually ehosen as
speakers or who are subject to the
razz of the others, there is slight
chance of a loss of dignity, because
they are of such calibre that they,
can razz or be razzed and still re-
tain it.
Most of all, the spirit and the
associations of the banquet serve
to remind all who attend that re-
gardless of place or rank, which
may have been the result of many

car on the suspicion that it is be-
ing driven by a student,- is un-
doubtedly the privilege of the of-
ficer, but to address a woman
driver in the above fashion seems
to the writer to be the height of
discourtesy.
A police badge is not an insignia
which gives one the right to insult
the persons who pay his salary and
behind which he can take defense
after so doing.
These officers, employed by the
University, might at least act as
gentlemen, whether they are such
or not.
Edwin J. Rennell, '32M,

Ir

Editorial Comment

i

A COLLEGE EXPERIMENT
(From New York Evening Post)
The great growth in college en-
rollments which has taken place in
this country in the past decade has
brought home to the larger uni-
versities the need of doing some-
thing to obtain for their under-
graduates those social benefits and
advantages which are a natural
and valuable part of life in a .-small
college
The Harvard "house plan" has
been projected with this object in
view. Now Yale is aboutto under-
take a similar development. Several
new residence quadrangles are to
be erected, each with its own din-
ing hall and common rooms. The
present plan of class dormitories
will eventually be abandoned or at
least modified, for it is proposed
that the new residence units be
made up of students from all four
classes. Each student will thus be
a member of a small but represen-
tative group and should be able to
make broader and more varied so-
tacts than is now possible.
Both the Harvard and the Yale
plans differ from the Oxford and
Cambridge system of separate col-
leges, with which they are some-
times compared, in that they cause
no division of the teaching staff or
of courses offered. Lectures and
recitations will be held as at pre-
ent. The change comes only in the
living arrangements of the stu-
dents.
Harvard and Yale are making an
experiment. Judgment upon its
value must be suspended until it
has been in operation for a while.
But everything points to attain-

dinner, but a formal banquet."
A banquetis easily worth two
dollars more than a mere din-
ner, he said.
Only $2.75 of the admission price
is for the banquet, officials point
out. The remaining two bits is to
cover the cost of mailing tickets
and to pay for souvenirs.
Yes, souvenirs will be given out
to all guests at this year's grid
banquet-unless no souvenirs can
be found that cost less than ten
cents a dozen.
As a relief from the long speeches
of previous years, committee mem-
bers confide their hopes of present-
ing a number of little skits to pro-
vide amusement.
Here is Rolls conception of The
Daily sports staff and women's
staff combining in a tasteful ballet
dance:
~NVNISR4
Confessions of a Chorus GirI
Where does the sissy sports staff
end and the wonderful (remember
this is Rolls) women's staff begin?
The sports writers would run
a banner headline when they
defeated us in basketball last
week, would they? Now maybe
we're even with them!
The grid-iron banquet resembles
the other chief function of the
University, the home-coming foot-1
ball game, in that it attracts many
prominent men from all over the
nation to Ann Arbor.
* * *

EASTER PROGRAM
Tonight' at 8 o'clock in- Hill Audi-
torium, the Unlversity of Michigan
Band, under the direction of Nicho-
las D. Falcone, assisted by the Var-
sity Glee Club Quartet, will present
a program of Easter music. The
personnel of the quartet is R.
Catchpole, first tenor, O. Brown,
first bass, S. Straight, second tenor,
and V. Peterson, second bass.
Stuart E. Churchill, tenor, and,
Roger K. ' Becker will be included
in the program, which is as fol-
lows:
Overture, "Festival" on Luther's
Hymn "Eine feste burg ist
Unser Gott"............O. Nicolai
Prelude in G Minor..Rachmaninoff
Varsity Band
Selections-
Varsity Quartet
Flute Solo, "Forest Bird". .. Doptler,
. Roger K. Becker
Angelus from Scenes Pit-
toresques............... Massenet
Easter Chimes Descriptive..... _
..........M. L. Lakel
Varsity Band
Selections-.
Varsity Quartet -
Tenor and Baritone Duet,
"Crucifix"..........Rubensteinj
Stewart E. Churchill
Otto Brown
Reve Anglique (Kamennoi-
Ostrow) ...........Rubenstein
Overture to "Stabat Mater".Rossini"
Yellow and Blue .............Balfe
Varsity Band
G. R. R.
VIRTUE, IF ANY-
Press notices have just come to,
hand from the esteemed manage-
ment of the Cass Theatre in De-
troit in which there is considerable*
gurglement over the fact that
"Hello Yourself" will be held over
to play a third week-out of defer-
ence of public demand.
Critic is tempted to remark that
God may be good but He certainly
is not very merciful; for "Hello
Yourself" really is pretty bad.
I have no information on this
point but it certainly seems to meI
that George Choos, who does the
"presenting," has put something
over on the Warings. As a musical'
comedy it is a weak imitation of!
"Good News" and on a lower artis-
tic plane than the Opera, if that
is possible. Warings' are good, but
not a bit better than they have any
business being; of course, they,

nual

ange)

Fes

'I"

(Programs subject to Ch

FIRST MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Wednesday, May 22, 8:15 p.m.
Soloists -
SOPHIE BRASLAU, Contralto
RICHARD CROOKS, Tenor
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
OvER'TUR, FROMi D MAJOR SUITE.................... Bach
ARIA, "SOUND AN ALARM," FROM "JUDAS MAC-
CABAEUS"................................Handel
RICHARD'CROOKS
SUITE, FOR ORCHESTRA, "IBERIA"..................Debussy
ARIA, "AH MrO FERNANDO"......................Doni'etti
SOPHIE BRASLAU
INTERMISSION
ARIAS (a) "PRIZE SONG" IROM "MA STERSINGER" Wagner
(b) "LOHENGRIN'S NARRATivE" FROM
LOHENCRIN". .....................Wagner
MR. CROOKS
SYMPHONIC POEM, "DON JUAN".................Stra uss
"GYPSY SONGS" .................................Brahm s
MISS BRASLAU
CONCERT WALTz IN F.....................Glalo-now
SECOND MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Thursday, May 23, 8:15 p.m.
Soloists
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano
LAWRENCE TIBBETT, Baritone
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL. V. MOORE, Conductor
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
PROGRAM
"A GaM AN REQUIEM"...... ...................Brahms
SOLOIrsTS, CHORUS, ORCHESTRA, ORGAN
INTERMISSION
"THE NEw LIFE"............. Wolf-Ferrari
SOLOISTS, CHORUS, ORCHtSTRA, ORGAN
THIRD MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Friday, May 24, 2:30 p.m.
Soloists
BARRYt HILL, Baritone
EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
ORCHESTRAL ACCOMPANIMENT
FREDERICK STOCK AND JUVA HIGBEE,
Conductors
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "MARRIAGE OF FIGARO".................Mozart
"SPRING'S .MESSENGER" .........................Schmnann
"HE SHALL FE HIs FLOCK" VROM "MESSIAH".. .Handel
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
ARIAS, (a) "ER T U" FROM "MASKED BAI..........Verdi
(b) "FORDS SONG," FROM "FALSTAVF"........Verdi
BARRE HILL

CANTATA, "THE HUNTING OF THE SHRK"........Bodd
MR. HILL, CHILDREN'S CHORUS, ORCHESTRA
INTERMISSION
CONCEeTO IN D, FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA......Brahms -
EFREM ZIMBALIST
FOURTH MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Friday, May 24, 8:15 p.m.
Soloist
EDITH' MASON, Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "SAKUNTALA"..... ............oiar
ARIAS, (a) "DEH VIENI NON TARDAR," FROM
"MARRIAGE 'OF FIGARO"... Mozairt
(b) "BATTI, BArrl," FRoM "DON JUAN". .'A.owt
EDITH MASON
RHAPSODY, "AmERICA"..................
INTERMISSION
ARI, Dr~isLnJOUR"' FROM '%gUTS 4~~''harpeagtie'r
MISS MAS-
SYMPHONIC DANCES FROM "DIE BAiKISCHt
VENUS" .........................W... etsZar'
ARIAS, (a) "ENTRANCE SONG" FROM 441iWMX
BUTT'ERFLY".................. ...q . P1uCCii
(b) "UN i, Di VEDREMO," 'ROM "MADAMx
B uTh'ERFLY" . .............................Puccin
Miss MASONv
S.AVO Ic DANcE, A FLAT......................Dvorak.
FIFTH MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Saturday, May 25, 2:15 p.m.
Soloist
JOSEF HOFMANN, Pianist
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
SYMPHONY, IN E FLAT................. .....Mo.iart
CONCERiTO VOR CELLO AND ORCHESTRA...............Stock
INTERMISSION
CONCI.RTO, IN D MINOR, FOR PIANO AND
ORCH 'STkA ... . .. .................. Rubinsteia
JOSLV IOFMANN
SIXTH MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Saturday, May 25, 8:15 p.m.
Soloists
r MARION TELVA, Cottralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor
RICHARD BONELLI, Baritone
WILLIAM GUSTAFSON, Bass
TITE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
PROGRAM
"SAMSON AND DELILAH," AN OPERA IN THREE ACTS..
......................................... Sant-Saens'

I

o- r.,: ,wF

af.

See the airplane below.
is the airplane going? It
to the grid-iron bznquet.

Where
is going

Is it carrying a faimous guest to
the banquet? No, it's carrying his
regrets.
tl nvm -1 n m o*a *ii nrmn.

SCHEDULE OF TICKETS

Season tickets-,$6.00, $7.00 and $8.00 each, except that if
1ia+:ca, -nr - c trr .r-trrn : l .;h nv p nn .. ~

All seats in the Second Balcony (top Balcony) $600.
OzInn ; ..:w1 rlnnfcr orv~l

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