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March 27, 1929 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1929-03-27

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ESTABLISHED
, C1890

I

L~~w: ia

......,, .-rte' ,,, . .,,,,. .

MEMBER -I
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXXIX, No. ,132. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 1929

EIGHT PAGES

I .r orrange Better SUBMIT BUDGET1
0LHH IL UUNIN [IL ServiCe During WITH TAX BILL
A d n Exodus (By Associated Press)
001S101___ LANSING, March 26.-G. Rt
Transportation Companies Combine Thompson, state budge director
To Supply Expeditious Service and Kit F. Clardy, assistant at-
... T'ergS storney general, have prepared aj
STo Departing Students mill tax measure to provide funds
y for state institutions. Items sug-
aWity, lae nm only inedanys Igested in this measure for the
awaylarge numbers of studentsUniversity of Michigan are $175,-I
MILLIONAIRES ARE INVITED r ing p for the annual 000 for land for the Lawyers
TO PRESENT VIEWS spring respite beginning next Fri-IClub; $533,460 for heat and lightI
ON SITUATION day, April 5. tn m n r r in 1930; $250,000 for an addi-
______ ~Transportation companies report tit h nvest eea
an increasing number of reserva- opion to the Un versity general
PROMINENT FINANCIERS a tions for the special service on the hospitadian $1,420,000 for butid-
ASKED TO GIVE ADVICE final Friday of school. Two nev i asur s coidered one
__routes are being planned by the of the important tax policies to
Senator.Thomas' Suggestion Chdsen Greyhound lines, they announced be determined by the present
From Various Proposals By yesterday, .e of these being to administration and legislature.
Committee Members Canton, Akron, Mansfield, Wooster, o ---o
and East Liverpool, and the other4
( (1\' A sciated Press) to Rochester, Syracuse, Utica, Her-
WASHINGTC March 26.-Some kimer, and points east to Albany.
of the countr best known finan- The Pennsylvania railroad con-
ciers, business mere, and manufac- templates a connection with its
tuers, alt millionaire many times main line at Toledo Friday after-
over, 'ktefjd by the Senate noon via the Ann Arbor railroad,
agricultural committee today to while the Michigan Central sched-
give advice andl assistance in solv- ule, which has not yet appearedN
irng the farm problem. will probably call for added facil-
Telegrams were dispatched to , a ities similar to those of the last Church And State Unite To ProvideI
group including Henry Ford, J. P. Christmas vacation.
"{The Greyhound Lines have in- Splendid National Funeral
Morgan, Charles M. Schwab, Owen te eyhote in hmein~ For Soldier Hero.
D. Young and Paul -M.. Warburg, Iectdnn ote m inm-g-r-
vacatin servce byoffringina-,.__

Uii n 1 in 1
IGHT OIBAZI
JIMINEZ AND IGLESIAS END
HOP FROM SEVILLE
IN BAHIA
STAY IN AIR 44 HOURS
ON 4100 MILE FLIGHT
Arrive Unexpectedly On Schedule
After Being Reported Only
Once During Trip
(P y Associated Press)
B A H I A, Brazil, March 25.--
Scarcely reported since leaving the
coast of Africa, the Spanish air-
plane, "Jesus del Gran Poder," with
Captains Ignacio Jimenez and
Francisco Iglesias, ended a bril-
liant flight from Seville at 10:30
a. m. today on the Latecore Field3
here wholly unexpectedly.
Only once since) leaving the
African coast were they reported.,
That was by an operator of the Na-

Advance Acceptances Indicate
Full Courtroom For Razz-Pest

Charles R. Corbin, Managing Editor managing
Of Toledo Blade, Among Those 1928.
Planning To Attend With mo
ceptance a
Acceptances for the Gridiron wishing to
banquet continued to pour in Tues- courtroom
day to the official sanctum of the should for
Marshal of the Supreme Court of soon as po
Injustice of the University, located March 30,
at 915 Oakland avenue. The annual K. Gage,
razz-fest will be staged in the vinathioco
Union courtroom a week from to- In the m
night, with some 400 national, torneys ar
local, faculty and campus B. M. on their re
O., C.'s present when Judge Clar- nation of
ence Cook Little calls the court- rhe trial,
room to order. yesterday's
Notable among the acceptances ed with
received Tuesday afternoon was 'ittle acti
one from Charles R. Corbin, man-L
aging ed.itor of the Toledo Blade, The variou
who, in response to a special in- the official
vitation to be present next Wed- Waldo Abi
nesday night wrote, in. part: clerk of co
"In spite of the fact that I'll have brought to
to make a quick jump to Columbus Little.
the next day where I am to speak
Thursday night, I couldn't possibly
miss this opportunity to attend the
Gridiron banquet, April 3. I con-I
sider it a ,real honor to be invited
to this affair, and am cancelling
an engagement here in order to be
I ith vn fn th nino-n Imnk

editor of the Blade in
ore than half of the ac-
quota already in, those
o secure a pass to the
next Wednesday night
ward their acceptance as
ssible and not later than
according to Alexander
29, chairman of the in-
immittee.
neantime, prosecuting at-
e working night and day
espective cases in antici-
a tempestuous trial for
f "loquacious lubricator."
as was announced in
Daily, will be conduct-
President Clarence Cook
ng as judge of the court.
us pleas will be kept in
. docket of the court by
bott, who will serve is
ourt when the trials are
the attention of Judge
I EE, CLUB
Combine In Presentation
ual Program Tonight
Hill Auditorium
MUSIC FEATURE'

asking them to appear within theI % t
next few days to give the corn- dition to thp
mittees their views on the- agri- taoe ve, other
cultural situation before the actual fago, Cleveland, P
writing of a new farm relief bill is alo, Cincinnati,
undertaken. ianapolis, St. Lou
The committee also invited See- City. All of these sr
retary Mellon, Gdv. Young of the from the Union,
federal reserve board, Chairmanm
Lewis of the Inte state Commerce Huse it was state
Commision and President Green of ice will also be giv
Sti p.

the American Federation or Laor.
Expect Some To Respond
Some members of "the committee
were skeptical whether all the fi-
nanciers, manufacturers and in-
dustrialists lists would .appear but!
others, recalling that John D.
Rockefeller, Jr., R. B: Mellon, a
brother of the treasury head, and
Mr. Schwab testified at a Senate
inquiry into the coal situation,
throught that some of them might,
come.
Morgan and -'Young, however; are
at present in Europe attending a
reparations meeting and for this
reason alone it was doubted if they
could comply with the request.
In deciding to invite. the group,
the committee acted upon a sug-s
gestion by Senator Thomas, Demo-
crat, Oklahoma, who contended
that business and labor were vit-
ally interested in the success of
the farmer anti their aid should
therefore be . obtained. The sug-
gestion led to 'an observation by
Senator Caraway, Democrat, Ark-
ansas, that "most of these men
don't know a horse from a co,."
Just because a man made a success
in a particular field, he declared,1
was -no reason to suppose he 'wouldy
be successful in all others.
"I remember" he -idded, "that:
Henry Ford went to Europe on a
peace ship to get the boys out of
the trenches by Christmas."
Many Express Disapprova
Senator Frazier, Republican,
North Dakota, asked if the idea
was now to "have the men who,
robbed the farmer tell us how to
help him" and Senator- Heflin,
Democrat, Alabama, observed that
"at leaste may be able to find
out how they robbed them.".

PROF. .RI
TALK NON
Will Narrate Metho
Public Service
By Gover
IS AUTIIORITY
Discussing a sub
he has been extens
ciously associatedt
20 years, Prof. Hen
of the civil enginee
of the college of En
University, now on
sence, will present
this evening in F
Engineering buildi
auspices of Transp
topic is "Public Uti
Prof. Riggs' add
special interest to
itical science and
well as engineerin
Prof. Walter C. Sa
gineering college w
in the arrangemen
will be concluded i
attending to hear
the University ban
torium, he states.
Aside from his
with the University;
served as consultin
New York Central,
tral, other railroad
companies, and ot
ities concerns, t

eialbuses men- M L Ttional Telegraph at Natal who said win you orti ne occasion.1 Know.
Mtheyhad passed over that place atI'll get a big kick out of the pro-
coaches to Chi- '2:55 a. 'm., so closely to schedule gram. I wouldn't miss it for the
Pittsburgh, Buf- (Yv Associaled Press) was this that it seemed to aviation 1 world."
?ort Wayne, In- PARIS, March 26.-Marshal Foch experts a feat of outstanding bril- ' Mr. Corbin is a graduate of Ohio
ws ll lavewas laid to rest today near the liance. State university, where he served
but reservations tomb of Napoleon. Faced Gasoline Shortage on campus publications, and was a
dvance at Chubb More than a million heads bowed The plane was reported to have member of Sigma Delta Chi, na-
passed over the island of Fernando tional journalistic fraternity, spon-
d. Special serv- as the great soldier was borne on a de Noronha off the coast of Brazil sors of the banquet. He became
en on the rett gun carriage from the stately somewhat earlier but there were no
Gothic nave of Notre Dame's cathe- witnesses and it was not. sighted
in 1 dral to the simple and severe cha- south of Natal until it passed over
pels of the Invalides. Bahia, circled, few back and land-
ed. Church and state, separated in g d. The chief reason of the land-
uu ~mg was because of the low level Tf
France for more than 20 years, of the gasoline'makingin inadvis- .
j united for the day to provide the able to continue the flight which
U Ldevout, christian soldier with a na- lasted 43 hours and 48 minutes, TOE0 O O FFEN IVE
tional funeral, unparalleled in The extreme fatigue of the avia-
pomp and magnificence. The world tors caused them to decide to rest 'Return Of Rebel Commander-In-
s . has seldom seen its like before and at Bahia for two days before start- Chief Believed To Indicate Move
ds Of Regulatn g it is not probable that such a show iCg on the 800-mile hop to Rio de Toward New Drive
Companies of solemn splender will be repeated Janerio, their original goal, which j
nments in this age. would have made their flight about
For the national funeral, the sixth 4,800 miles, or 200 miles longer ATTACKS MADE BY AIR
V ON FIELD in the history of the republic, than that of Ferrarin and Del
. ..crowds surpassing even those of the Prete. (By Associated Press)
ject with which I armistice-which the dead marshal The flight of the Spanish avia- JUAREZ, Chihuahua, March 26.-
ively and auspi- was so instrumental in bringing tors was interrupted by fever of 1Subjected to another air attack by
during the past about-thronged Paris streets and Capt. Jiminez due to fatigue of the hen aiat tkJ
ry E. Riggs, head the concourse about the Cathedral trip, La Nacion's correspondent at the government aviators who took
ring department I of Notre Dame. Bahia telegraphs. a toll of four dead and 17 wounded,
agineering of the Inside the cathedral some of the Illness Hindered Flight insurgent forces of the main revolu-4
a leave of ab- highest figures of royalty, military The dispatch implied that the{ tionary base at Jimenez, Chihja-
a lectuye at 7:30 life and European officialdom gath- aviators might have continued ihua, tonight were believed to be
Room 348 West ered. The brilliant uniforms of the their non-stop flight to Rio Janeiro prepared for their long heralded
ng, under the soldiers and diplomats were mingl- had not Capt. Jiminez been taken offensive against the steadily ad-
ortation club. His ed with the black and white full -'ill. The aviators will remain at vancing army of General P. Elias
lity Regulation." evening dress of other notables. Bahia for two days: Calles.
Iress will be of Not even in the days when the Bahia. or Sao Salvador, is on General Jose Gonzale Escobar,
students ofP English king, Henry VI, was crown- the northeast coast of Brazil, lo- the insurgent commander-in-chief,
economics, as ed was there a more impressive cated about 800 miles north north- left Juarez to return to active dutyI
ig, according to service at Notre Dame. The rites east of Rio Janeiro, the goal of at the head of his command. In
dler, of the en- began with the appearance of Pres- their flight. It as about 4,000 miles the revolutionary chieftain's ab-
who has assisted 'ident Doumergue, who entered the from Seville, Spain. sence, Jimenez twice was attacked
nts. - The lecture great doorways of the cathedral as by the federal air men, and rebel
n time for those greaadoowaysifdthccathdralasday__that__Gen-_
nte cort of ithe strains of "De Profundis" swell- Official Call Loan leaders mdicated today that Gen-
the concert of ed from the organ. eral Escobar planned to retaliateI
d at Hill Audi- After the "De Profundis" came Rate Climbs During ithdcava combined offensive by air
the "Intoit" andtand"Kcavalry.o
wide experience tnntt" and he Kyrie, from Record Tradig y C Almazan, leading one of
y, Prof. Riggs has the Requiem of Faure, sung by the Reor iradin D y i Calles' main columns, was moving
g engineer to the choir; then the "Dies Irae" of Meu- northward to meet the insurgents
the Illinois Cen- nier was heard. Eight Million Shares Change Hands and was concentrating at Bermej-
is, several power Those inside the cathedral did As Credit Crisis' Raises illo. The insurgents reported fur-
ther public util- not number more than 5,000 al- Rate To 20 Percent ther southerly movements to checkI
throughout the ; though in their midst were the I the government forces.1

Iu t
Groups To
Of Ann
In
EASTER

Featuring a program of Easter
music, the Varsity band and glee
club will jointly present their an-
nual spring concert at, 8 o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium: Students,
members of the faculty, and towns-
people are invited to attend.
A tenor and baritone . duet to-
gether with a number of selections
by the Varsity quartet of the men'sl
glee . club have been arranged for
the vocal portion of the program.
The balance of the concert will be
furnished by the band assisted by
the Frieze Memorial- organ. Robert
K. Becker, '29, is to give a flute.
solo, "Forest Bird" by Doptler.
Stewart Churchill, Spec., and Otto
H. Brown, Spec. Ed., will sing the
duet, Faure's ."Crucifix." Effective
lighting and decoration plans' have
been arranged for the auditorium
in order to lend effect to the music.
A vibra-harp, recently invented
! and perfected concert instrument,
has been added to the equipment
of the band according to Treasurer
lRobert A. Campbell, sponsor of the
two organizations, and will be used
publicly for the first time in to-
night's concert.
Included in the numbers to be
played by the band during the
course of the evening are: "Fes-
tival" from Luther's Hymn "Eine
feste Burg ist unser Gott", by O.
Nicolai; "Prelude in G minor" by
Rachmaninoff; Massenet's "Ange-
j lus from Scenes Pittoresques"; M.
L. Lake's "Easter'ChimesvDescrp-,
tive"; Rubenstein's "Reve Ange-
"alique;" Rossini's overture to "Stabat
MVater;" and the "Yellow and Blue."
The glee club quartette is com-
posed of Rolland E. Catchpole, '30,'
Sydney F. Staight, Spec., Otto H.
Brown, Spec. Ed., and Vincent L.'
iPeterson, '29Ed.

TWO FACULTY MEN'
FOR FOREIG'N STUDY
DUFFENDACK AND BREDVOLD
RECEIVE GUGGENHEIM
HONOR AWARDS
MEMORIAL FOUNDATION
GIVES 82 SCHOLARSHIPS
Many Prominent Artists Included
In 1929 Appointments For
Foreign Study
Two members of the University
faculty, Prof. Louis I. Bredvold of
the English department and Prof.
Ora S. Duffendack of the physics
department are included in the 82
persons who have been honored by
appointments to fellowships of the
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial
foundation, it was revealed yester-
day.
The Guggenheim awards were
established by former Senator
Simon Guggenheim of Colorado,
and Mrs. Guggenheim, as a me-
morial to their son. The capital
fund of the foundation $3,500,000.
Awards for this year will total
$180,000.
Awards are made to scholars,
painters, sculptors, composers,
authors, and theatrical artists for
advanced study abroad. A total of
230 fellowships have been provided
since the establishment of the fund
in 1925.
Twenty States Represented
The group honored in this year's
appointments is representative of
20 different states and 37 educa-
tional institutions. Seven artists,
five composers, and five authors
are included among the individuals
selected. Eighteen of the group
are not connected with any educa-
tional institution.
Of the two professors chosen
from the Michigan faculty, Pro-
fessor Duffenback has been work-
ing for several years on-the dis-
charge of. electricity through mix-
tures of gases, a subject of impor-
tanc in determining the structure
of 'the atoms and molecules of
gases. He will study at the Uni-
versity of Goettingen in Germany.
Professor Bredvold will begin his
studies here this fall and will
continue in Europe for a period of
12 months. He expects to spend the
larger portion of his time dur'ing
this studying in England.
List Includes Pulitzer Author
Among the nationally interesting
men who received fellowships is
Paul Green, assistant professor of
Philosophy at the University of
North Carolina and author of the
Pulitzer prize play, "In Abraham's
Bosom," whose fellowship was re-
newed to permit him to carry on a
study of the European theater and
to engage in further creative work.
The Guggenheim foundation of-
fers the only important national
fellowship for persons "whohave
already demonstrated unusual ca-'
pacity for productive scholarship or
unusualtcreative ability," accord-
ing to the wording of the an-
nouncement.
At least one member of the Uni-
versity faculty has been included
in the winners in each of the four
years that the awards have been
made. In 1925, Prof. Ralph A.
Sawyer of the physics department
was so honored. Prof. Lewis V.
Heilbrunn of the zoology depart-
ment was recognized the following
year.
Prof. Albert Hyma of the history

department and Dr. Robert R. Die-
teprex of the Medical school were
the University men: to be chosen
in 1928. Both are now on leave
and are continuing their studies
under the terms of the fellowships.

! r%"nvirlatlf nf flip nnfinn thp heir to

{
,i

thmSenator McNar of.- Oregon, recoutry.v e asterpresentea a in, pJeit1U Iib U-. the LBr' itih W~mpi(13vI, 'ocited r jS UD NTS VE LF
chairman of e mitteaid he la to NEW YORK, March 26-The
had no object to initing the ! rates, and regulation in general, be- thecrownuprince of Belgium and!worst credit crisis in'nine years
group as they might have some fore the Interstate Commerce com- other figures whose earthly rolesrate on call loans RE OF ES
valuable ideas. He expressed the mission and numerous public util- dh t alves of their fellow men, n jacked up from 12 to 20 per- Grapling with an armed negro
opinion, hovever, that not many ities commissions. 1ientl n and as high as 25 percent was in he ithn ofmthedhoe of
would avail themselves of the op-cetanashgas2pretws
LEARN WHYvBANKS-demanded "in outside markets", to- in the kitchen of the ome o
portunity to give their views on POOR STUDENTS LEARN WHY BANKS day brought about one of the most Cramer Smith, Pontiac banker,
farm relief. MAKE CH ARGE FOR LOW BALANCE -turbulent sessions in the history of Graham Shinnick, '31, saved the
Previous to the decision tissue MAKE Cthe New York Stock Exchange when negro's wife from death Monday
the invitations the Senate commit- !ngros wfe romdeah Mnda
tee heard a variety, of proposals By Gumley . customer-whose monthly balance prices crashed$5rtoned $35a night and narrowly escaped death
from, several witnesses and a move Just about this time every month runs under $50-a reasonable fee s a u himself as the negro wrenched
was started among members of the students begin to substra t a do- business via the handy check book. record-breaking turnover of $8,246,- himself loose and fired twice at
ag lar ro hercheck bokbalances haeeut740. close range.
obtain assistance directly from the v "W e carefully figured out The previous record was 6,942,500. Shinnick was visiting the Smith
administration even though Presi- 1-either with a resigned sigh or an the yearly cost of handling these shares on November 23 last, home when he was attracted to the
dent Hoover has announced that w audible grumble-and wonder why small accounts and the results The credits tringency was the in- pantry by the screams of Hattie
the actual work must be done by their bank has a right to charge show that each one costs us $7.24,
the committee themselves. { a dollar for the privilege of hand- so that at a dollar a month we direct result of the federal reserve Wilson, negress cook, whom he
Aside from what took place pt ling their money. make very little over the actual oardi'on of n ember banks in cur- her husband. The latter, Ronald
the capital, a group of co-operative Max E. Williams, officer of a local expenses. Not many accounts run oag the volume of credit on Wilson, was in the act of stabbing
marketing organiaztions met dun- bank, was asked the reason yester- during the summer months, of speculative collateral. This has re- his wife with an ice-pick.
ing the day with representatives of day and his answer was a list of course. About two-fifths of our sulted in the heavy withdrawal of Shinnick crashed a water pitcher
the three major farm organiza- Ifacts that seem to justify this item student accounts run under the re- funds from New York by outside over Wilson's head and wrestled for
tions. This gathering approved a of banking practice. quired amount every month and town banks during the past week, Ithe possession of a revolver which
legislative program to expand the "We handle about 2,500 ac- are charged this dollar fee. and the disinclination of New was protruding from the negro's
federal government's agricultural counts," he said, "and threequar- Mr. Williams stated that no York bankers to meet the defi- pocket. Meanwhile the wife, bleed-
credit facilities and while this de- ters of these show a balance at the charge is made for the collection ciency. ing from a scalp wound inflicted
cision was not considered as con- end of the each month that is of out of town checks. Foreign with the ic-pick, fed upstairs.
stituting a general farm relief plan, scarcely adequate to cover the checks deposited here are mailed to
it was looked upon by the confer- j carrying charge. A bank makes the home bank free as part of the Freshmen Give Trial Overpowering Shinnick, the negro
ence members as one provision m rwhsrvle hc a e
that sho bea incrored rin money, of course, by investing service, and frequently, he said, Talks Before Adeiphi come entagled with his clothes, and
that should be incorporated in the funds deposited by customers, and twenty or thirty thousand dollars T k eo fired twice as Shinnick hurried
general program. .naturally student accounts of the willbe "floating" in the mail. ITry-out speeches for the fresh- through the back door. Both bul-
dwindling type have no loan value. I"rhe service charge for small ac- men debating team of the Adelphi lets went wild.
r I . e r_ T%_n Handlin an account of this sort counts." Mr. Williams went on, "is ,PCs'tii ~ e.fn ndr p a r I Th mddnd neon thn char'-

E OF NEGRESS
TRANGED HUSBAND
the police from an upstairs phone,
and Shinnick sounded the . alarm
next door, telling the neighbors,
"You'd better get some more cops

Seats
For

Still Available
Mimes New Show

Tickets for Mimes presentation
of "In The Next Room" may be
obtained at the Mimes theater box-
office any time today or the remain-
ing days of the week. Notwith-
standing the omission of a Wed-
nesday night performance, patrons
will be able to purchase seats for
the remaining performances today.
OurjkWa' her~an

Graham Shinnick, '31
and doctors beeaus sonehodv's on-

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