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February 15, 1929 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-02-15

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ESTABLISHED
1890

It

Akr

WY ,--.

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXXIX. No. 98. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1929

EIGHT PAGES

P01100k STAMPS
HIS APPROVAL ON
CAMPAIGN UN[S
POLITICAL SCIENTIST SPEAKS1
OVER MICHIGAN NIGHT
RADIO PROGRAM
PEET SPEAKS OF
MEDICAL INNOVATIONS
Prof. White Talks On Artificial Gas]
Heating And Its Use With The
Future In View
"With the exception of the large+
Democratic deficit, there can be1
little complaint with the financial
management of the last campaign,"
stated Prof. James K. Pollock of+
the political science department in
his address on the seventeenth1
Michigan Night radio program of
the current series broadcast through
WJR Detroit.
Was Large Expenditure
Professor Pollock, who was ab-
sent from the University last year
while in Europe studying money in
elections, had as his subject
"Campaign Funds in 1928." "The
campaign of last year brought
forth the largest expenditure of
money that this country has ever
seen, in facttthelargest expendi-
ture of money for political purposes
that the world has seen in any sim-
ilar period of time. But intenest-
ingly enough this campaign has
been the first in recent decades
which has not raised the cry of
"slush funds." Both parties being
adequately financed, there was not
reason for either to complain about
the other," he said.
"Money is no more important to-
day than formerly but its regula-
tion continues to be a matter of
urgent public importance. Unless
unscrupulous schemers are ruled
outaby an alert public giving sup-
port to adequate laws, party funds,
instead of being a public good, will'
become a public menace.
Feet Discusses Surgery
Speaking on "Ti igeminal Neu-
ralgia or Facial Tic," Dr. Max Peet,
professor of neuro-surgery in the
Medical school, told of that branch'
of surgery which is today becoming
important, that of relieving many
who otherwise were doomed to a
life time of intense suffering. Facial
Tic or Tic Douloureux as it is more
widely known, was described as an
example of such a disease. Dr. Peet
told at length of its cause, symp-
toms and treatment.
"ArtificialGas For Heating the
Home' was the topic of the speech
given by Prof. Alfred H. White of
the chemical engineering depart-
ment, in which he - described the
advances being made in this di-
rection and the probable outcome
of our use of this means of heat-
ing. "The use of gas for house
heating is one of the most impor-
tant steps which will make possible
the elimination of soot and its ac-
companying effects from the air,"
he said, "for although we may com-
plain most about the factory smoke
stacks, it is the domestic chimney
which is the most prolific source
of soot in our atmosphere. The
problem for the future is to dimin-
ish the cost to the consumer so
that It will be feasible for the man
with the average pocket-book to
heat his home in this manner.
Model Airplanes-
The concluding talk, entitled
"Making a Flying Machine," was
delivered by the "Air Flying"
Scribe, a graduate student in the
School of Education. The Scribe's

talk last night was the second ofr
a series which he is giving on the
radio programs, in hisattempt to
encourage greater interest among
children and adults *toward the
building of airplane models. He
then described a specific model
and the process employed in its
construction.
During the interim of; the!
speeches a series of musical num-
bers were presented by Anthony J.
Whitmire, instructor in the School
of Music, a student of Witek and'
Barmas of Berlin, and Carl Linde-
grin, a graduate of the School of
Music.
91MEDY CLUB TO OFFER
POPULAR PRESENTATION
"Take My :Advice," Elliott Lester's
popular comedy, will be presented

UNION TO INAUGURATE '
PEN BRIDGE TOURNEY'
Winning Teams Will Receive Cup;
Runners-Up To Get Season4
Passes To Mimes
Registration will begin today for
an all campus bridge tournament
to be conducted under the aus-
pices of the Union house commit-
tee. Entries will be received at
the side desk in the Union lobby
from 3 to 5:30 o'clock each after-
noon during the coming week.
A silver loving cup, according
to Union officials, will be present-
ed to each member of the winning
team and a season pass to the
Mimes theater will be given to
each of the members of the team
placing second.
Regulations for the tournament
are 'as follows: All games are to be
played in the Union, as the ban
on card playing in the Union will
be lifted in order to permit tour-
nament play.
Three out of five rubbers will
determine the winner of each
match. One new deck of cards is
to benfurnished by each team. The
Union will furnish new cards for
all games after the first round.
COOLIDGE WANTS
SUMMER ESTATEI
Would Have White House Erected
In Virginia Blue Ridge
Mountains
SPOT IS NEAR WASHINGTON
(Bpy Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.-Mount
Weather, Virginia, in the Blue
Ridge mountains about 50 miles
northwest . of Washington, will
probably be the site of a country
White House, a residence that its
sponsor, President Coolidge, will in
all likelihood never occupy.
The chief executive has recom-
mended to Congress that $48,000 be
appropriated to establish the pro-
posed country White House on Gov-
ernment property now used as a
weather bureau station. His recom-
mendation suggested legislation to
transfer the Mount Weather prop-
erty to the Director of Public Build-
ings and submitted a list of repairs
and improvements needed to con-
dition buildings on the land. f
President Coolidge waited until
near the close of his term to sug-
gest a country White House, his first
public mention of it being in a let-
ter to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch
on Dec. 9.
He referred to the heavy duties
of the President and wrote that if
he responded to all the appeals
made to him from outside sources,
"for all of which he will be sought
with the inference that unless he
responds civilization will break
down and the sole responsibility
will rest on him, he will last in of-
fice about 90 days."
He suggested that the Govern-
ment provide a country White
univoin hnhillsnr Wcito_

PRESIDENT

"APPOINTETO SETTLE
- BOUNDARY DIFFERENCES

IA WFI I

O FFER CHANCE TO BUY
I HBM~.F0'ENSIAN AT L.OW RATES

PLANS TO INSPECT
RECLAIMED AR[AS
DRAINAGE PROBLEMS TO DRAWf
ATTENTION OF CHIEF
EXECUTIVE-TO-BE

J
I

U.V NI Limin 11U VI I 3
AUTHOR m.SPEAK[RI
10 LECTURE HEREJ
HAS HAD VARIED EXPERIENCES d
AS ADVENTURER AND i
VAGABONDD

TERMINATES VACAT10N %..... TRAVEL PICTURES
IN FLORIDA REGION ILLUSTRATE TALK',
Hoover Takes Advantage Of Last Versatile Writer Was Only AmericanF
Chance To Fish In Gulf Stream Observer With Lawrence
Of Biscayne Bay ",In Arabias
{Py Associated Press) Alaskan explorer, gold miner, i
MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Feb. 14.-1 range rider, metropolitan reporter, .
With his Florida vacation to end !_ _ _literary free lance and magazine1
probably next Monday, President- - writer and a graduate of three uni-
elect Hoover will spend tomorrow! Frank M.McCoyIversities-these are a few things z
and part of Saturday on a trip Brigadier Genea i e Unite Lowell Thomas, noted author-lec-
of inspection of the Lake Okeech- States Army, who has been select- turer, has already accomplished in
obee district of southern Florida ed as the American member of the the comparatively short time of 30
where it is proposed the federal board of mediation to settle the odd years. f
government will spend more than Bolivia-Paraguay boundary quar- Is Sixth Attraction
$10,000,000 in flood relief and im- rel. McCoy supervised the recent This far-famed "gentleman ad-
proving navigation. elections in Nicaragua as Presi-v,,a
FinishesHis Wokn.dent Coolidge's personal represpn- venturer and vagabond," as he has
tative to that republic . and served been termed, will appear i Hill
In preparation for his departure with great advantage to the tiny auditorium Tuesday night, Feb. 19,
for the Everglades tomorrow, Mr. Central American government. as the sixth number of the current
Hoover cleared his desk of an ac- Oratorical association 1 e c t u r e
cumulation of work, received more course. Tickets for the Madam
than a score of visitors and still 'Sun Yat-Sen lecture will be -used
found time for several hours of on this date, it has been announced;
fishing on the edge of the Gulf by the Oratorical association, in
Stream of Biscayne Bay. He thus view of the fact that Madam Sun-
availed himself of' perhaps the last YatSen was forced to cancel her
opportunity he will have to fish in engagement here in order to attend
Florida waters before he enters the the re-burial of her husband inI
White House on March 4. - - China.{
While Mr: Hoover was busy with Message Announcing Safety Of Now in his early thirties, Mr. !
rod and reel, the volunteer cabinet Rogers Averts Expected Hunt Thomas has had a most amazing'
makers again went into action, For Missing Flyer career of adventure and travel. He
spurred on by the announcement - was the only American observer
from Washingt'on that William M.
Jardine, secretary of agriculture. MAY O TO SAPELO ISLE Arabian campaign and with Gen-
had accepted the post of counsel . '
for the Federated Fruit and Vege- v .>ssoci:acd Trs,) ' eral Allenby in Palestine when the,
table Growers. MIAMI, Fla., Feb. 14.-The im- br'illiance . of the Crescent faded
This announcement came as a mediate plans of Col. Charles Lind- forever before the Glory of the Cross
surprise to most members of Mr. bergh were indefinite today, follow- Material gathered on these expedi-
Hoover's party who had expected ing a radio message announcing tions forms the basis for his lec-
Mr. Jardine to serve in the Hoov-!M ture to be given in Hill auditorium,
er cabinet at least for a time. A the safety of Harry Rogers, iss "With Lawrence in Arabia and
list of names from which it was ing flyer, for whom the lone eagle "Wi Laeeine " a
suggested the next president might had planned to search. Allenby in Palestine."
select- an agriculture secretary in- Lindbergh had expected to hop; Pictures To Be Shown
eluded Dante Pierce, Des Moines this morning to aid in the hunt but I Remarkable pictures taken on
publisher; Thomas Campbell, Mon- abandoned the flight when infor- i these missions will be used to
tana wheat grower; Sentors Mc- med that a radio message from illustrate this lecture. The gripping
Nary of Oregon, chairman of the Nassau, New Providence island, story of Lawrence and his super-
Senate agriculture committee and said Rogers and his three compan-;human achievement in raising an
Capper of Kansas, long a farm ions were safe. an ent in h
leader in the Senate, and former When called this morning, Lind-I army of' 200,000 Bedouins in the
governor Samual McKelvie of Ne- bergh was still in bed and did not Arabian desert is only a portion of
braska. answer the telephone. While he the story Mr. Thomas has to tell.
Plans Auto Tour has not announced his plane, he In his spare time, Mr. Thomas
On his automobile tour of the has been invited to spend several has written several best sellers. A
Okeechobee area, the president- days on Sapelo island, Ga., on his year or so ago he visited GermanyI
elect will be accompanied by Gov- return north from Miami. The and gave to the world the amazing
ernor Carlton, of whose invitation invitation came from Howard F. story of Count Von Luckner in his4
Mr. Hoover will obtain first-hand Coffin. Friends of the flyer said book the "Sea Devil." Count Von
knowledge of conditions there. he probably would accept. Luckner appeared in Hill auditor-
Near Canal Point a village on the 1
east side of 'the lake, 86 miles from i iPORT AU PRINCE, Haiti, Ieb. 14. lum' as the first lecturer on this
Miami Beach, the party will be -A mail 'plane of the Pan-Ameri- year's course. In 1926 Mr. Thomas
joined by Major General Edgar can Airways was safe here today { traveled over 27 European coun-
Jadwin, chief of army engineers, after an S 0 S call at sea Wednes- tries by aerial routes.

Price Of Yearbook To Be Increased
After Special Three-Day j
Sales Campaign
A final opportunity to purchase
subscriptions to the 1929 Michi- }
ganensian at $4 with a subscrip-
tion coupon and $5 without, a
coupon will be offered to the stu
dent body during a three day sales
campaign to take place on Tues-
day, Wednesday, and Thursday
next week, it was announced yes-
terday by J. Franklin Miller, '29,
business manager of the publica-
tion.
The price of the 'Ensian xvili ad-
vance to a permanent charge of
$5.50 following the campaign.
Pledge cards, according to Miller,
will not be redeemed after the
subscription campaign.
Fraternities which plan to turn
n 15 subscriptions and to receive
a free copy of the annual and
have not done so should make ar-
rangements with the 'Ensian busi-
ness office at once, Miller stated.
A large part of the copy from
the editorial staff for the 1929 'En-
sian is complete according to
Thomas Thomas, '29, managing
editor.
CREW RESCUED
BY1 TWO SHIPS

STORM WAVES HIT1
[UROPEAN1TOWNS
CAUSINGDISASTER
CROWDS STORM WAREHOUSES
AS FAMINE THIREATENS TO
CLAIM VICTIMS
RIVERS AND CHANNELS
ARE CHOKED WITH ICE
Riots Result From Insuflicient Fopd
Supplies And Crippled
! Transportation

Twenty-Five Japanese Saved
Freighter Grounded
On Rocks

From

t
BREECHES BUOYS USEDj
(ly 1.\ ccilcd t 'cnse ,
SEATTLE, Wash., Feb. 14.-I
Twenty-five Japanese, who werel
snatched from the freighter .Meiyo
Maru while it was being ground to
pieces on the storm-washed rocks
of the Aleutian islands, were safe I
aboard the steamer Illinois and]
the Japanese ship Nankoh Maru+
today.
Fragments of messages reach-
ing here Wednesday night told of
the exciting rescue but many de-
tails were lacking. It was pre-
sumed that the rescued crew was
being taken to Dutch' Harbor,
Alaska.
The rescue was effected by l
shooting breeches buoys from the'
Illinois and the Nankoh Maru to
the doomed ship and pulling the'
crew of the Meiyo Maru to safetyj
one by one.
In a pounding sea and with the
rescue ships working dangerously
I near the rocks, the buoy lines.
often sagged until their human
cargoes were dipped into the roar-
I ing surf before being hauled to
safety.
The Meiyo Maru, a freighter of
5,400 tons, ran aground early
Tuesday morning during a storm.
Several hours later the Nankoh
Maru reached the -scene but was
unablerto effect a rescue because
of the ferocity of the sea. All day
Wednesday she stood by until the
Illinois arrived. The latter encoun-
tered great difficulty in reaching
the scene.
At Dutch Harbor the crew of the
freighter Alloway was recuperat-
ing after having been picked up by
the steamer Montauk about 100
miles from the wreck of the
Meiyo Maru. Thirty-three men, all
but one of the crew, abandonedI
the Alloway as it seemed about to,
crash into the rocks of Unimakpdss.-
01
I TRYOUTS WANTED I
T Freshmen who wish to tryout I
I for the Business Staff of the I
I Gargoyle should report at a
meeting for all new tryouts to I
' be held today at 4 p. n. in the I
Dress building.
Carl U. Fauster, I
! i Business Manager

(y Associated Press)
LONDON, Feb. 14.-Estimates of
d e a t h s from abnormally cold
weather in central Europe alone to-
day ran as high as 300, with thou-
sands suffering from frostbite and
kindred injuries.
Apparently worse was in pros-
pect, with suffering acute, practic-
ularly in southeastern Europe,
from fuel shortage. Mines of Po-
land and Czecho-Slovakia were
looked to for relief, but disruption
of railway traffic added even those
countries to those hardest hit.
Berlin Schools Close
Rivers and sea channels over
most of Europe, save in Spain,
were frozen over and choked with
ice. Rome, celebrating Ash Wed-
nesday, had a heavy snowfall. The
Riviera was covered with snow. In
Berlin, schools were closed for a;
week to meet the icy conditions.
Temperatures in many cases
without precedent and lower than
for 200 years were reported over
Europe. Meanwhile, northern Scan-
dinavia was normal and Iceland
and Spitzenbergen reported tem-
peratures as high as 40 degrees.
Storm Coal Depot
In Budapest, shivering men and
women stormed a coal depot dur-
ing the night after the government
had announced distribution of free
coal at 8 a. m. Because of the in-
tense cold they were unable, to
wait and they smashed doors,
loading bags, baskets, boxes and
even pockets with the precious
fuel. Fifty persons were sent to
hospitals with sprains, lacerations
and frozen hands as a result of the-
ensuing riot and conflict with po-
lice.
In Vienna, Chancellor Seipel or-
dered parliament suspended for
two weeks because of the weather,
explaining this would save five
tons of coal daily. The Austrian
ministers at Prague and Warsaw
made personali appeals to the ru-
ers of Czecho-Slovakia and Poland
for additional fuel, pointing out
that Austria's supply had shrunk
from 125,000 to 20,000 tons.
Cars . Are Frozen
But in Czehcho-Slovakia miles of
coal-laden freight cars were frozen
fast to the tracks and -could not
be moved, while in Poland ration-
ing of coal supplies had been re-
sorted to to avert a shortage there.
At Lwow, Poland, not a single
train had arrived or left for the
last three days and a food short-
age as well as fuel shortage faced
, the city. Forty per cent of the rail-
road staff in Poland was incapa-
citated for work, either by the cold
or influenza.
In the Cattegat and the sound
between Denmark and Sweden 130
steamers were frozen fast, await-
|ing attempts of ice-breakers to
release them. Baltic sea traffic was
subject to the greatest hazards.
England Is Troubled
Bitter cold prevailed in England,
and many rivers were beginning to
solidify. While London was free of
snow there we :e heavy drifts else-
1 where, and roads were impassable.
The Isis and Cam were frozen over,
with tfe effect of stopping prac-
tice of the crews of Cambridge and
Oxford.
The canals and lagoons at Venice
were completely frozen over, for
ithe first time, it is said, since the
eighteenth century.
T e"eud-i*weat eeau pre;
Th r n h w a h r b r a r ,*dited even colder weather, and,
today a heavy snow started falling.
Ice was forming today in the Seine
and Maine, threatening stopping o,
tra~ffic in them.

I L1gusethn LnVnaw i
ton "whence he would lave that who already has recommended to day and five hours afloat on the t
freedom of action which he has. Congress an appropriation of $7,- open water.E
only at the White House and where 640,000 for flood control. Another The plane, a Loeningi amphibian,
he could get a complete change of member of the inspection delega- left Santiago, Cuba, in charge of
atmosphere. tion will be Representative Frank Pilot Rowe with mail, but no pas-
Although the inference was made R. Reid of Illinois, who is chiarman sengers, at 8 a. in. Wednesday. 'A
that it would be used mostly during of the House committee dealing broken rocker arm soon forcedthe
the summer, the President wrotewitheflosegislationtog plane to alivghot and it was forced
that the residence would not be in to taxi for five hours at a six-knot
a strict sense a summer White Party Includes Many speed in a high wind and heavy sea
House, adding that it might be de- Others who will accompany the until it reached a protected cove.
sirable at times for him to visit President-elect in a motor-cade of j There the necessary repairs were
various sections of the country. 20 automobiles include Glenn B. effected and the plane took to the
Sk Pp Reublicau national com- air with eight cylinders functioning.
T I I WEIATIIERSkipper, p F dIt arrived here at 4 p. in.
T -- Winitteeman for Florida, several -
(By Associated Press) state officials, all members of the MIMES
Mostly cloudy Friday and Satutr- state drainage board, and Fred C-. WL-
day, probably occasional snow; a Elliott, chief engineer of t he NEW MODERN COMEDY
decided change in temperature. (Everglades drainage board. A
-As tihe second attraction of their
Miae'swil do"To The La-
KALEIDECSCOPIC VARIETY MARKS ZALGAZ CIRCUS dines"i"e s wi lo"ToKaufman ad
PEFOM NC IVNANWHTEYTHA wE~ar MacMonelywinwrteamn

Is Able Speaker
In addition to being a popular
author and adventurer, Mr. Thomas
is reputed to be one of the ablest
speakers in America. His pictorial
record of events in Arabia and his
later travels have been endorsed
by the press and more than four
million people in the English-speak-
ing worlds who have heard huim
speak.
When he was 27 years old, Mr.
Thomas was made head of an
I Allied mission and attached to each
of the armies as official historian.
He has been the intimate of Gen-
erals, of Sultans, Prime Ministers
and Kings, a cosmopolite known
to princes and beggars of Jerusa-
lem, Kabul,. London, Rangoon,
Rome, Paris, and Singapore.

l

O

0

PERFORMANCE GIVEN ON WHITNEY THEATRE STAGE arc Connell wh rote amon
I -other things Duicy" and "The
With great tooting of horns and theater. Occasionally the balloons Butter and Egg Man."
a parade of all the latest auto- were popped in especially raucous Casting is being completed this
mobile styles that the factories appreciation. week by E. Mortimner Shuter, di-
arouUnti the actual performance the rector.' Definite dates have not
around Detroit were able to con- Iless initiated members of the cam- been arranged as yet, but definite
I ceive for the occasion to rival the pus and the University were mys- details concerning the production
Detroit Auto Show the Zal Gaz tified and not a little annoyed by will be forthcoming soon, accord-
Circus, sponsored by Zal Gaz Grot- the sound of the tooting horns in- iug to Shuter.
to number 34, has come to Ann Ar- lerfering with their blue-bookish
bor; coicntration. Some few wonder- GOLOKETTE'S ORCHESTRA
With this innovation of the loyal ed whether Zal Gaz was inaugurai;-f
rottoists the calling of circus per- ing a "Joy Month" after the fas- TO PLAY AT LAW DANGE
grtosseclig o ics per ion of cinema-magnate Butter-
former has arisen to heights of hio. of thema-anpe B er-
__, _. .-_.4-,~field, but their vain hopes were }'Jan oldett' ountrv(Club !

STUDENTS WILL DISPLAY KNOWLEDGE OF NEWS
IN CURRENT EVENTS CONTEST THlS AFTERNOON

This afternoon a large number
of students will compete for prizes
and demonstrate their knowledge
of Current news in taking the ex-
amination of the New York Times
Intercollegiate Current Events,
contest. The test will be given at
three o'clock in room 2023, Angell
I hall.
. The contest is a competition in

addition, his paper will be sent to
New York to compete for the na-
tional prize of $500.
The student writing the second
best paper will be presented with
a prize of $25. A special award of
$75 will be made to the under-
classman (freshman or sopho-
more) whose examination is
judged best. All regularly enroll-
ed students who have not com-

_
1
_
S

PRESIDENT LITTLE
LEAVES FOR EAST
President Clarence Cook Little
has left for New York City and
Boston where he will deliver sev-
eral addresses over the week-end.

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