100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 22, 1929 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T 1-4 El MI(," 1-11 :x'

! r ,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

(

V
cm
MW A TA
VATA- M A sm As

,._5° ..S
7 + ti

1

1'

'~wp'~j ~

i3

2

JUNIORS ARE VICTORS.

Old Timer Tells Past History Of
Grounds Of Women's League Building

LEAGUE IS PLANNING
FANCY DRESS BALL

I.

BY130 TO 20 COUNKT
TAKE, -SECOND PLAC[
GAME IS CLOSE THROUGHOUT
FIRST THREE PERIODS;
PLAYING IS FAST

SENIORS LEAD STANDINGS
Freshmen Third In Tournament
Ranking While Sophomores
Stand Fourth
Closing the interclass basketball
tournament with a 30 to 20 victory
over the sophomores yesterday af-
ternoon, the Junior I team main-
. taied second plae in class stand-
ings for the season. The game
was fast throughout, but it was
not the best basketball, because
both teams. were trying too hard
to win. Although the final score
was rather one-sided, the entire
-game was not a walk-away, for it
V was not until the end of the third
quarter that the juniors were able
6 to break away from the red team.
Beginning with a good lead, the
juniors made baskets soon after
'.the first whistle. The sophomores
found themselves immediately,
however, and the first period ended
with the score standing 10-11 in
'V favor of the sophomores. The see-
S ond quarter started out in a spir-
ited fashion with Marshick feed-
ing the ball to a junior forward
who scored, giving her team the
lead. The ball went from court to
court, but the half ended with the
juniors ahead, 17 to 13.
Fouls gave the sophomores a
chance to come up within one
point of the junior record early in
the second , half. The work of
.~Marion.Geib for the next few min
utes, however, added to the junior
count and at the end of the third
period they were still leading with
i a six-point margin. During the
last quarter both of the junior for-
wards managed to drop in two
fbaskets
If the sophomore forwards could
have combined accuracy with their
d speed,' the final count might not
have been so one-sided. They had
difficulty getting the bl, however,
for tall Margaret Ohlsoni in the
junior center court generally got
the tip-off and the junior forwards
were fed the ball in rapid manner.
The line-up was:
Sophomore I- Junior I.-
T. Quarry....RF.. .... M. Geib
E. Wood .... ...LF..... M. Cassidy
9 H. Moore ....... JC...... M. Ohlson
H. Wilson.....SC.... D. Marshick
I R. Crooks ....RG... M. Crawford
E. Whitney .....ED......F. Sackett
6. Substitutions: Juniors-D. Berko-
n witz, M. Stahl.
The interclass tournament final
standings are as follows: Senior I
-1000; junior I-.500; sophomore
,I-200; freshman II-.400.
The Student Senate of Ohio
1 State recently passed a resolution
favoring a student governing body
of both men and women. Under
this new plan, women of any col-
lege on the campus, heretofore
without adequate representation
and with no voice in legislation, 1
would be eligible for election.
i Strings .. Supplies
..repairs ..
for all Musical Instruments
t Schaeberle & Son
MUSIC HOUSE
110 S. Main St.
OPTICAL
DEPARTMENT
. r Lenses and Frames made-
p c To Order
Optical PrescripJtionS

Filled
HALLERS
State St. Jewelers
EASTER
Candy Specials
Largest display
of Easter Candy
ntown for
Mother, Wife,
Kiddies or

Famous residences, an old ath- so named because of the dead cats
letic field, and boarding houses that were thrown in. It was used
filled with tradition have all been for many years as the rubbish
sground for Ann Arbor and the
I swept away to make room for the University. And yet no matter how
new Women's League building. An many tin cans and carloads of dirt
r old timer now watches the prog- were dumped in, the hole refused
ress of the fine new structure and jto be filled. Often it would catch
1remembers the same location a it fire and burn for days at a time.
dremembekrs th ctiFor several years a toboggan slide
used to look in the past. was built there in the winter.
On the southwest corner of the On the south side of the build-
lot was the old Duffy residence. ing were also many old residences
The Duffy's were old settlers, and which were torn down earlier tot
their three sons were all varsity !make room for all sorts of restau-
men. James E. Duffy, who is a rants and coffee houses whichi
member of the Student Board of sprung up there. Going back ear-
Control used to hold the Inter-col- 1er still to 1874 a different view of
legiate championship for drop- that -territory has been preserved
kicking. It was on the site of the lin a steel engraving presented to;
Natural Science building that the the Michigan Union by O. A. Moe.'
old University athletic field used to Incidentally this plate has disap-
stand, and here the athletes col- peared from the trophy room of
lected. In that same vicinity of the Union.
the Chemistry building were the J This region is filled with many|
old University hospitals. They were tales and much of its history has 1
old rambling frame structures ex- been forgotten or destroyed with;
tending all the way back to the all the old buildings, but a new
Diagonal. history is about to take its place;
Returning to the League build-(at the completion of the Women's
ing grounds, next door to the Duf- League building.,
fy residence lived Professor Albert ~~~N~~~~L~~~~~-~~~N
Stanley, formerly head of the INTERCLASS AND IN
School of Music. The white houseA
which still remains used to be a WILL FEA TURE BAS
great deal larger and was a famous intercass awards, individual
boarding house where all the ath-Id
letes spent their time. Across the awards, and the intramural cup,
street where Hill Auditorium now as well as the announcement of
stands was the old home of Pro-1 the all-star basketball team will
fessor Winchell. It was an octa- t
gonal house, and was later used feature this year's basketball ban-
by the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. quet at 6:15 o'clock on Tuesday,
After it was wrecked a large hole March 26, at the Women's Athletic
remained where bonfires were held. Building. The banquet holds more
after all the games when, accord- interest than ever this year as pooro
ing to the old timers, "the boys weather prevented the completionc
were really alive." of the hockey schedule and award-r
On the northwest corner of the ing of that cup this fall.
League grounds Ted Jollies had Silvecuae also to be given
his home. He ran a popular steak) fn tio-R" -+,...f _.... _.

I I

Women
To

Will Come Gaily Dressed
Make Annual Affair
Colorful Success

WILL BE HELD MARCH 301
All women who are planning to
attend the annual Fancy Dress
ball on March 30 should have the
plans for their costumes well un-
der way by now. Within the next!
few days members of the commit-
tee for the ball will call each or-
ganized house on the campus and
find how much work it has done
toward it.
Although the party will be car-
ried through with an Easter motif.
the various groups do not have tc3
dress accordingly-their ideas may
be as original and as varied az
they please.
The ball will begin at 8 o'clock
and will be held in Barbour gym.
It is hoped by the League, which
sponsors the party, that Easter
plans will not conflict with a good
attendance.

i
i

I
l
l
.
T
M
I
'iz
i
'it
.
.z
ti
I
f
3 (
T
I
I
C
;
R:
I
.
f
t
i
it
c
z.
:

Flint Girl, Future Michigan Student,
Edits Unusual Magazine, "The Quill"
A nineteen-year-old 'Flint girl, Professor P. M. Jack, head of the
Miss Evelyn Labinski, who recent-Irhetoric department, says of this
y magazine, "It is an extraordinary
ly visited the campus and who is magazine to come from Flint-to
planning to enter the University come from anywhere."
next fall, is the youngest editor in Each issue of The Quill is devot-
Micnigan, and probably the young- ed to a special theme, for example
est editor of a magazine in the the present quarterly number is
world. The Quill, as her magazine called the "17th and 20th Century
is called, has a circulation of three number" and the next issue will be
thousand. known as the "International" num-
Besides having obtained such a ber. The articles in each issue
large circulation for her magazine, may cover a range of fields but
Miss Labinski has as contributors they all have a bearing on the gen-
to it such nationally known figures eral topic of the issue. For exam-
as James Ramsay MacDonald, for- ple in the "17th and 20th Century
iner prime minister of England, number" there is an article on 17th
Norman Angell, English novelist, Century religion, one on 20th Cen-
and the Rev. Henry Emerson Fos- tury religion, one on music in the
clIck. Other contributors famous 17th Century and Today, and oth-
in this country are Lawrence H. ers on physicians, philosophy, dra-
Conrad, former professor of rheto- ma, painting, etc.
ric at the University, Jessie Bon- Miss Labinski plans to enter the
stelle, Percy Ives, Dr. Lynn Harold i University next fall. Last spring
Hough, and Mme. Victoria Cassan. she graduated from the junior
Miss Labinski started her mag- college in Flint. While she is in
azine at the age of 12, writing it the University, she will turn the
out with pen and ink. Then a advertising and publishing details
friend taught her how to use the of The Quill over to a - business
typewriter and she typed out four manager, but will handle the edi-
issues of The Quill. Three years torial end herself. Hitherto Miss
ago Miss Labinski began publish- Labinski has done all the work of
ing the magazine regularly. It ap- getting out the magazine herself.
peared quarterly and was priced at After she is out of college this
50 cents a copy, as it now is. young editor plans to make her
The Quill is printed on smooth magazine more nation-wide than
thick white paper with very black I ever, she plans a circulation of
type, and with illustrations that 10,000.
look like etchings. It is devoted to Interesting themes that Miss
the higher arts. Mr. Lawrence H. Labinski has in mind for future
Conrad once said in a letter, con- issues include such topics as Pio-
cerning this magazine, "Thebwhole neer Heroes, Social Russia, Finland
"agazine is conceived in beauty -which, she says, is supposed to
."and again, "The art work is be the most modern nation--Kub-
splendid." la Khan, and Aztec Civilization.

LORCH WILL TALK
TO LOCAL A.A.U.W.
Prof. Emil Lorch, head of the
School of Architecture, has accept-
ed an invitation to address the lo-
cal American Association of Uni-
versity Women when it holds its
regular monthly meeting at 3:00
o'clock on Saturday, in the auditor-
ium of the Architectural Building.
His talk will be on the subject of
"Modernism in Architecture," and
will be illustrated with slides.
Hostesses for the Saturday meet-
ing will be pre-school groups num-
ber one and six. Mrs. Carl Schmalz
is chairinan of group number one,
and Mrs. Arthur Van Duren is the
chairman of group number -six.
The Architectural building will
not be open beforc 2:30 on Satur-
day afternoon, according to Mrs.
Donald May, who is in charge of
plans for the meeting.
Evelyn Labinski, 19 year editor
from Flint, whose magazine, The
Quill, has already won a state-wide
reputation will be present. The re-
port of the nominating committee
for new officers will be submitted
at this meeting also. Anyone who
is interested in the activity of A
A. U. W. is urged to attend.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
$2.25 for the half year.

rDIVIDUAL AWARDS
KETBALL BANQUET,

M is awarded, for 600 points the
right to wear the W. A. A. silver
pin, and for 1200 a large M. Be- I
sides getting points for the major
sports, it is easy to earn one point
a mile for hiking, and 50 points for
going out for rifle 12 times, as well
as many other ways.
Points for basketball are being
awarded more carefully this year j
on a basis of interest and sports -
manship, as well as skill in play-
ing.
There will, be a great many mire{
attractions to the banquet aside
from the awards. It will be a get-
together with class team songs anO
dancing to Edna Mower's orchestra.
No tickets will be sold after to-'
night, Friday, as it is necessary to
know exactly the number that will I
be present. Tickets may be re-
served by calling Helen Wilson,
22249, or Jessie Church, 7891.

.

f1
IF

I

FRESHMAN WOMEN

_ ,

Sign up for pageant tryouts
on sheets posted in Barbour
gymnasium and at the Women's
Athletic building.

_v
,
,

Athleic bulding

0 - U

and chop house where the College
Inn now stands. Across the street
on Twelfth and East Washington
was an old Jewish burial ground.
It was in this lot that all the wan-
dering circuses held their perform-
ances. Across from that is the
park named after Ex-Governor
Felch who was one of the first gov-
ernors of Michigan.
Down the hill facing the east.
side of the building where the Uni-
versity Laundry is now situated
was the old "cat hole", probably
TAILORED
FROCKS

o thers time as awards for
individual sports in rifle, archery,
and bowling. It is surprisingly easy
to win points under the present
system and many girls no doubt
have many more points than they
suppose. It is advisable to check
up with Gertrude Smith, who is the
point recorder for W. A. A.
For 300 W. A. A. points a small

i
t
c
a
l
i

ZWERDLING'S GREATER FUR SHOP
Now Showing
FUR NECKWEAR FOR EASTER
At GREATLY Reduced Prices
Our selection of fur scarfs is now complete. Here you'll
find every smart fur and every new shade authorized
by fashion-and you'll be agreeably surprised at the
attractive prices.
The Smart Thing to Do--Leave your fur
coat with us for storage and walk out with
ZWROL 3GBLDG.
the latest style neckpiece.N AftBORMICH
A complete fur service
since 1904

LANE HALL TAVERN
Choicest of Wholesome Foods
DINNER CONTENTMENT rIRE
MUSIC JLPIES

c

yF$4
II I

n show
which

NO III
_ = t ll I i 1 ial l IUi111uiU lii fl g n lltltirlllill111f1Ii1U
COMPLIMENTS
TO A,-
FORMAL FROCK
If you are going s l .,_ o the F nan wm i or C1te hC&case
Dance or if you are plannin to attend a houseparty later
in the season you will appreciate our collection of smart
new accessories for evening.
JEWELRY
Smart accents to your evening frock mnight be rhinestone,
crystal or Chanel necklaces with bracelets and earrins to match.
! $125 and up
BAGS
Our newest bags are made of metal with pearl trim- -
aming in flat or pouch-style, of sequins in flat models or
gay colored brocade. Match your slippers with one of the
metal bags or brighten your black frock with one of ther
brocaded ones . . . you will be delighted with the effect.
$5 to $45
A NEW PERFUME
Bourjois' "Evening in Paris" is delightfully distinctive and
new. The perfume, the compact and the face powder will win
your instant approval. A delicate odor encased in silver and blue
enamel.
Perfume, $1.75
compact, $2.50 and $1.00
Powder, $1.00
First Floor

.

It Is Only

Mrs. Anna Kalmbach

e

Few Steps to Mai Street
But you can move those few steps into dollars,
No matter what you want to buy, it may be a Coat, an
Ensemble, a Gown, or perhaps only a piece of Lingerie
or a pair of Hose-it doesn't matter. Main Street prices
save you dollars.
JUST NOW we are offering some
very remarkable values which you'll
be interested in.
SPRING COATS. .. .a. Special at $25.00 and $39.50
SPRING SUITS. .. .. Special at $25.00 and $39.50
SPRING ENSEMBLES . Special at $15.75 to $39.50
SPRING GOWNS ... Special at $15.75 to $49.50
EVENING GOWNS . . . Special at $25.00 and $29.50

EXCLUSIVE! We alone
you Pierrot Models, one

cal
of

is sketched above.
Smocking, plaiting, novel tuck-
ings have made these tailored
crepes the favorite of the college
miss.
Sizes 12 to 20
$22.50
A[ 1t

GOTHAM HOSE
Picot Top-Unusual Value at, $1.95

The E. F. MILLS Company

m

i r

6

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan