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March 21, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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INEEM N 10 ILFEDE RALS CON+TIN UE STEADY ROU7T OF INSURGEN'dTS C!3YOOYLL0UDNSIOBEH
rvrnu Ihat "bootlegging in[ nes
."...' AL ALK education",e consisting in the lea ae

OF FOREIGN
ALTED BY PLAN
>tand English,'arnd in s uc h
of delinquency, admission is

Edmonson, Morris, Curtiss To Talk
On Twenty-Sccond Michigan
Night Program
UNION ORCHESTRA TO PLAY
Talks by three members of the
University. faculty and a musical
program to be presented by the
Union dance orchestra will com-
prise the 22nd Michigan Night
radio program to be broadcast be-
tween 7 and 8 o'clock tonight from
the Morris hall studio through
WJR, the "Good Will Station" of
the Richards Oakland company,
Detroit.
James B. Edmonson, dean of the
School of Education,. professor of
secondary education, and director
of the Division of University in-,
spection of High Schools, willI
speak on the subject-"TheOldI
Versus the, New in. School Educa-
tion."
The second talk of the program
will be delivered by Prof. Amos R.
Morris of the rhetoric department.
Professor Morris, author of "The
Orchestration of 'the Metrical

Under the auspices of the College

entrance of foreign students into iu Uy the uiveiies, omen
after the candidate has come to
the United States in violation of I America, either surreptitiously, or

of Architecture Prof. JohnnyRoos-the Immigration Act of 1924, may in a legal manner, the plan will be
of t University of Stockholm be further curbed, a committee of in the form of a test to determine
will deliver three lectures at 4:15 the College Entrance Examination the candidates' aural and speaking
on the afternons of March 25, 26, board will meet next Saturday in knowledge of English.
New York for the purpose of en- While a majority of the foreign
and 27 in th' ground floor lecture- larging a plan whereby the tBoard students are from Europe, a for-
room of the: architectural building. will sponsor English comprehen- midable percentage of them are
He was expected to speak here last 'sion examinations in various cen. from other parts of the world. It
'ters of the world. is planned, therefore, to establish
hisy visituntl' now. The lecturer The direct impetus of this action centers of exafnination at certain
has just completed a course of lec- was due to the inability of the favorably located cities. To these
tares at Princeton university customs officials to effectively limit points the candid'ates may .come
ur a P the number of non-quota immi- for the test. If they competently
The srAbjects. whieh Professor grant students by regulating the pass the 'examination, an admis-
Roosval will present are "Roman- number of visas issued. In the sion card will be granted to the
esque Pchitecture in Sweden and year immediately following the in- applicant,- which will be his sole
DenmfArk," "Mural Painting in stigation of the immigration act means 'of gaining admission to any
Swed ish Churches," and "Sculpture an increase of almost 200 foreign accredited American University.
of spain and Southern France in students was evinced by -the ad- ' Ira M. Smith, 'registrar of the
h': Eleventh and Twelfth Cen- mission records of the accredited University, is a member of the
,dries" respectively, on the three American Universities. committee which will meet next
days. Accordingly, a plan has been for- ,Saturday at New York, and has ex-
Professor Roosval is in charge of mulated, which will enable the ad- pressed an opinion heartily in favor
the Zorn collection at the Univer- mission officials of the Universities of the proposed 'plan to quelch sur-
sity of Stockholm and is also en- to determine the competence of reptitious "bootlegging in educa-
gaged in.research activity. His re- foreign applicants for college en- tion".
search has had to do largely with trance before they have left their
medieval architectural remains in Inative lands. The proposed device KANSAS STATE .A G R I C 'U L -
Sweden, but he has written on is as follows: ,Inasmuch as in the I TURAL COLLEGE.-The men here
many subjects and is one Sweden's majority of cases foreign students placed themselves as firmly op-
first authorities on ancient and seek admission before they are posed to the stockingless fad now
modern art and archaeology. adequately qualified to speak and raging among the co-eds.

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Line," believes that the language With a large federal army under battle impends. Above, a federa army barracks at Torreon. It was
arts may be taught by an analysis War Minister Plutarco Calles mov- battery rushed from Mexico City tc at Torreon- where Villa fought the
of. vibrations caused by human ing in attack on Torreon, north bombard Torreon. Lower left, E decisive battle in 1912 bringing
speech sounds which carry intel- Mexican key city, and rebel forces detachment of federal cavalry ir about the downfall of the Huerta
lectual and emotional content. rallying to its defense, a decisive the Torreon sector. Lower right ;overnment.
Ultimately, -English composition'---
will be taught in a laboratory 1 PIPE CO LECTING are Mozart among the earlier com- covering new poets and painters.
says--hence he has chosen as his Jtposers and Strawinsky among the j But' at the end of the interview
topic, "What is a Rhetoric Labora- I JACKSDHOBBY later ones. Professor Jack admitted that he
tory." =-Within his work, however, Pro- had a genuine hobby. It is the
Prof. Ralph H. Curtiss, of the Rhetoric Department Head Also fessor Jack evidences several pe- colleting of pipes. Included in his
astronomy department, will give Interested In Music, Books, culiarities or eccentricities. in the j"fuming" fortune are about 120
the final address speaking on Painting, And Drama realm of books, where so much of pipes, twenty of which he has here,
"Mars Again." Professor Curtiss is his time is spent, he has what and about a hundred at home in
the director of the University Ob- "I have no hobbies," answered might be termed a hobby. It is the 'England. But in ranking the types
servatory. Prof. Peter M. Jack, of the rhetoric collecting of first editions. Any one of pipes he places the purely
The Union dance orchestra will department, when the question of who has ever attempted to pur- American contribution first-the
again provide the music for the what he did in his spare time as a 'chase a first edition will realize corn cob. Next comes the, cherry
broadcast tonight. The orchestra, hobby was asked him. "I am for- what an expensive hobby this is. pipe, and then the clay pire. His
under the direction of Paul Omer tunate in being engaged in a work The first editions he specializes in taste prefers Craven Miture, a
and Don Loomis and directed by which is to most people a hobby,"., are those of the eighteenth cen- blend imported from England,
Bill Suthers, will present a series he continued. Professor Jack's Itury and those of contemporary which should make it appear like
of dance numbers. work in the rhetoric department is f editions. He also delights in dis- Ianother expensive hobby.
t, ______a rather overlaid occupation, cov-
University of Hawaii.-Freshmen ering a large field. His work in-
at the tniversity of Hawaii have a cludes an interest in music, paint-
hard tine. The boys must carry ing, and drama. His interest in
two brands of cigarettes in a nice music, he claims, is not a hobby
clean sock, altogether without either, but rather an integral part
-holes. The girls, are required to of his work. Evenings Professor
wear grass skirts and goggles and Jack is very fond of spending with
to always be plentifully supplied the radio, listening to' his favorite
with favorite brands of jellybeans. composers, the headliners of which
r { n Mothe1r s

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