100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1928 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

THEM__ ANDA!

HARVARD UNIV ESTY
SPONSORS NEW VISUAL
PLAN FOR EDUCATION'

-----

THEIR TERMS EXPIRE THIS YEAR

I

Head Of Dartmouth GEOLOGICHL CIETY
College Commends
Present Day Youth EFTS IN CLEEAN

ill

Masten Chase

EASTEJIN SCHOOLS WILL PRE.
PARE PICTURES 0N SCIEN.
TILFIC SUBJECTS
PATHE TO MAKE PICTURES
Series Planned For Use In Universi.
ties; Contract Covers Period Of
Five Years
Hrvard University has definitely,
entered the field of visual education
through the medium of motion pic-
tures. As a result of a contract be-
tween Harvard and Pathe Exchange,
Inc., of New York, the university will
prepare series of .pictures dealing
with different scientific subjects, to
be known as the Pathe Science
series.
Although these pictures are des-
tined primarily for university, col-
lege and school uses, they will be
appropriate for the theatre, the
church, the club and other social or-

"There was never better material
in the schools and colleges than at
the present time," declared Ernest
M. Hopkins, president of Dartmouth
college, in an address recently in
which he- strongly defended the qual-
ity of present day students and the
character and industry of present day
youth in general.
"There was never better education,
and never such a demand for more
education," he continued. "And that
demand is likely to increase."
Further praising youth, he said
that "There was never a generation
with more frankness, honesty, gen-
osity and, yes, earnestness than the
present. The nations which have
trodden entirely in the faith of their
fathers have had , sterile histories.
Thb question is not what the men of
pioneers' courage have said in the
past-the Washingtons-the Lincolns
-the Hamiltons - but what they
would say if they were with us to-
day."
FAMOUS NOVELIST
IS REPORTED ILLI

- ..to
Characteristic poses of, President office is gradually diminishing. To d
Coolidge and Vice-President Dawes, ate it looks as though the President's
taken recently in Washington. With "I do not chees to run" is going to
1928 well on its way, their term of hold good. ,
LATHAM AND iGLIDDEN INVENTORS
OF FIRST "WRITING MACHINES"

Gould, Case, aid Hobbs Deliver Talks
Before Meeting Held At Case
School of Science
MICHIGAN MEN PROMINENTj
Attending the meetings of the Geo-
logical Society of America almost in
full force, the geology department
spent Dec. 29, 30, and 31 in Cleveland.
Prof. William H. Hobbs, head of the
department, delivered a paper on "The
Glacial History of Southwest Green-
land," Prof. Ermine C. Case read a
paper on "New Triassic Vertebrates,"
and Prof. Lawrence M. Gould read a
paper on the "Geological Results of
the Putnam Baffin: Bay Expedition."
Professor Hobbs divided his time
between the Geological society meeting
at the Case School of Applied Science
in Cleveland, and the meeting of the
American Meteorological society at
Vanderbilt in Nashville. At the lat-
ter meeting he delivered a paper en-
titled "Some Meteorological Results
of the Second Greenland Expedition
of the University of Michigan."
Those of the department who were
present at Cleveland but did not speak
were: Prof. George M. Ehlers, Prof.
Charles W. Cook, Prof. Irving D. Scott,
Ralph L. Belknap, Fred M. Bullard,
and Maurits W. Senstius.
Beyer Will Deliver
Labor Address Here

Many are taking advantage of the
reductions we are giving on this
Sale-which means $8 to $15 on a
suit and $10 to 20 on an Overcoat

Clothing
Sale'

ganizations. The series, when com-
ple-ted, will be distributed through
Pathe's thirty-three branch ofrces alll
over the country. The first of the
series will be ready for distribution
January 30, 1928.
A Contract Signed
The contract, which extends over
a five-year period, was signed by
President A. Lawrence Lowell of
Harvard and Elwr Pearson, first
vice president of Pathe. Pathe has
also been cooperating with Yale Uni-
versity th-rough the distribution of
"Chronicles of America" series for
four years.
Only one branch of science, Aith-
ropology, the study of mankind, is
specifically mentioned in the con-
tract. However, the division of ge-
ology has also decided to participate
in this work and has a series of pic-
tures in the course of preparation.
Dr. Kittery F. Mather, of this division,
and Dr. Ernest A. Hooton, of the divi-t
sion of anthropology, are heading ai
committee which will supervise the
Dreparation of the pictures..
After representatives of the two
divisions have selected films whicha
they consider of value, graduate stu-1
dents will classify, cut, assemble and1
title the various pictures in the
series. A workshop has already been
set up in the Peabody Museum at'
Cambridge and twe graduate stu-1
dents in anthropology and one in
geology ,are already at work.I

All Suits Reduced 20 %
All Overcoats Reduced 25"%
All Corduroy Coats Reduced 20 %
All Leather Coats Reduced 20 %
All Silk and Wool Hose*Reduced 20 %

In the late sixties, two men, C.
Latham Sholes and Carlos Glidden,
who had been working on an invention
that they called a "writing machine"
brought their work to a conclusion
and went in search of a buyer of their
product. That was the beginning of
the present day typewriter. In the
course of their peregrinations the two
men visited Gen. Anson Stager, presi-
dent of what was then known as the
Western Electric Manufacturing com-
pany. After a short negotiation a con-
tract with that company was drawn
up and manufacture of the new ma-
chines begun. That was the beginning
of their manufacture.
Yet,' just as the Western Electric
was setting to work on a "model of
the machine, its inventors, through
their enterpreneur, George Washing-
ton Yost, discovered that the arms
factory of E. Remington and Sons was
practically idle, due to the recent clos-
ing of the Franco-German war. Inas-
much as the arms factory could easily
be converted for the making of the
writing machine, an arrangement was
effected whereby that firm was to make
the machines and the Western Elec-
tric company was to sell them.
It was recognized that the model
of the "typewriter," as it had come to
be called, was far from perfect and
the Remingtons set out to make a new
one. In the autumn of 1875, this
model was completed and accepted as

London, Eng., Jan. 8.-Thomas
a good substitute. Hardy, famous English novelist, has
When the first machines had been been reported seriously ill at his
sold and put into operation it was home in Dorchester, England. He is
found that they too had many defects. 88 years old.
Realizing that initial expenditures "Tess of the D'Ubervilles," "The
were not.yet over and that the ma- IReturn of the Native," "The" Mayor
chine might be more than they had of Casterbridge," and "Far from the
bargained for, the Western Electric Madding Crowd" are some of the-best
turned over the sales rights of the known of Hardy's novels.
machine to the Remington company For some years lie has written
in exchange for $10,000. And since practically nothing, preferringto re-
that time the typewriter has evolved main in the background instead of
and changed until now it barely re- emerging into the open and quarrel-
sembles the sewing-machine type of ing with the critics.
the first one. HEAD OF-1

0. S. Beyer, Jr., consulting engineer
and labor expert, will speak next
Thursdak before the combined labor
and management classes of the School
of Business Administration and eco-
nomics department. His address will
deal with some phase of cooperation,
between labor and management.

An Added'Feature of this Sale
20% Discount
on all Shirts
(This week only

WASHINGTON MAN
VISITS FORESTRY
DEPARTMENT HERE
Shirley Allen, of the Washington,
D. C. office of the American Forestry
association, visited the School of For-
estry and Conservation Saturday. He
inspected the forestry Laboratories
and dined with members of the fac-
ulty at noon.
Allen has been instrumental in ob-
taining many forestry- measures from
Congress. He has been interested in
many of the recent conservation
measures which have been passed
lately. His position has placed him
among the leading statesmen of the
country and he tells many anecdotes
of congressmen and government
officials.

k

PVNMAKORS

® ®®

Very soon you will require
a Rider Master ewn
The pen that won't balk or run dry in the middle of
an Exam.
} Superior, writing qualities.
Large ink capacity.
The pen that will not wear out or get out of
order easily.
Guaranteed and serviced by the makers. No delays.
Rider's Pen Shop

Ih

Masten & Chase

If

211 S. Main St.

"Where You May Ruy With Confidence

-.
CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

N 'II i I

SERVICE

r _ #
n

1

*

I

I

N

W-

w

w

w

W,

w

DON49-T

FORGET

Monday

orning,

an ,

99'

7

I

a.. rr

III

ooks, Stationer and Supplies

of

All Kinds Greatly Reduced

5"' T, WICTLY CASH

N($GOODS ON APPROVAL

/.

I

AA I

aL A'pf~

H - - - U U - i =AW u u wo mru MU W

1a I M i '

L

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan