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May 27, 1928 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-27

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I L- PUP Wr l-TMA N TY A T T Y

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;11A Y L L1Z .

Published every morning except Monday,
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publication..
Memaber of Weater. Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Uicbiganas second class atter. Special rate
Df postag~e granted by Third Assistant Pust-
mastcr .General.
Subscription by earrier, $4.6o; by mail;
$4.50
fficeee: -Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
hard Street r
P'hotes: Editorial, 492s; Business 21214.

LTl

EDITrOUJAL STAIP#
Telephoine 49 6
MANAGING EDITOR'
jO H. CHAMBERLIN

Editor.............. .. . ...EKllis , F. Merry
FIL >r , Michigan Weekly.. Charles EBehym r
Newsditor..............Phiip C. Brooks
t' city i tator.. ..........ourtla d. C. Smih
Women's dtor......Marian . Welles
Sports Editor... .....Htrbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books ind Music.Vncent C. Wal, Jr.
Assistant City Editr.. . Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert,'FA.Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewat Hooker Kpne'th G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milto Kifb1aun
Reporters~
Esther Anderon. SAY _Kno,
Margatet 'Artu- Min 11. Maloney
Alex . Ichsntowskl Marion MDonald
J ean CanA k Charles S. Monroe
essiChp r ('atherine Price
Bla Ertl W.HaroldL. Pasman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Margaret -Gross- Rita Rosenthal
Valbor g Egefad Pierce oseberg
Marjorie iFolrer Eleanor Scrhner
James 13. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
Roert J.,Gesser Robert G. Silbar
EIlaine E: (ube Howard, F. Simon
Alice 1lagelsbaw . George E. Simons
osephV. ll oweyl Rowena Stillman
J.Wallace Hushen Sylvia Stone
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilly
William F. Kerb Bert. K. 'ritsheller
Eawrence R. Klein dard I. Warner, ,'.
Do'ald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
jack L. Lait, Jr. Toseph Zwerdling
BS ES STAFF
Telephone 21214
.BUINEISS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager...George I. Annable Jr.
Advertsing.... .......... Richard A. Meyt
Advertising...... ..Edward I Use
Advertising...........John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts...................Raymond Wacter
Circulation..............George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication..................Harvey Tacot
Assistants
George Bradley ay ilofelch
Marie runnunieHer Hal'A.Jaehn
James Carpenter James Jordan
Charles K. Correll Marion Kerr
Barbara Crooell Thales N. Le ington
Mary Divek Catherine Mc inven
,r .Bessie V .iTgcand D' orothy .Lyons.
Ona Feke Alex K. Scherer
Katherine Frohne George Spater
Dougjass Fuller Ruth Tompsn
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Vrnum
Helen Gross Lawrence Walkley
F. J.ammer Hannah Wallen
Carl IV. Hammer
SUNDAY, MAY 27, 1928.
Night Editor-PlERdE ROSENBERG
SWt111 THIS ISS
With this issue the senior staff,
which has worked faithfully (yes), and
true for three and one half years and
which has managed this here publi-
cation for the past 180 issues, retires
from the scene of conflict. As usual,
this is the best class which every re-
tired from The Daily-and they unan-
imously admit it. It would be unfair
to let them pass without a word of
comment-so here is the comment:
Ellis B. 1lMerr
Who served as editor and in this
capacity has been respoisible for the
editorial page. Contrary to general
belief, he has not ceased running stu-
dent publications, for next year he
will enter the Law school in order to
be eligible for a place on the Board
in Control. From this new position
he will be able to prevent the new
editor from doing the ihngs that he
has done with the page.
Courtland C. Smith
Who is better known as C. Cathcart
Smutz. He was city editor during the*
entire year, though better known for
his work as president of the StudentI
Council. He is one of the few campus
politc s who ever achieved success
with nt l rng hands or learning
first names, and as if this were not
enough t'ute he has broken all pre-
cedent am-o city editors by working1
from time .to time.
llariian Welles
Who was 'women's editor, though'
the position only required her pres-
ene at T. Daily office when the'
check -eady. In her absence,
hqwe ~4ofice has been over-
r4li wlt i'cabers of the wdmen's
staff, with fthe result that the page
came. - out regularly each day. Miss
Welles, in addition, was co-star with
the managing editor in the University
movie.
Philip C Brooks

Who served as staff. For two years
and a half he did as much work as;
any half dozen ordinary men on the
publicatien-but then be became a
senior. During this period he was
able to get anyone he wanted into the
managing editorship except himself.
and even he himself was managing
editor of the Summer Daily at one
time.
Charles Behiymer
Who was our weekly guest, having
been editor of the Michigan Weekly.
Aside from being exceptionally intel-
ligent, he has had an unblemished
record on student publications, start-

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[been wrong about four times out of of the new museum building, and of
five. I thenew stadium. It has been, in
.Miton irshbanii { another way, however, considerable
Who was senior night editor and of a quiet year because there have
did excellent work all year reporting been no University appropriations to
for the Chicago Tribune. There were be secured from a rather shy state
other persons on the staff who came legislature. Next fall will not be so
from Chicago but few of them lived dull in this regard.
it down so well. From an academic standpoint the
V'icent Wall University has marked steady p'-
Who was music and drama editor gress, which has probably been the
and not -even ashamed of it. He also case since it opened its doors. The
wrote the opera book in parts, and has University college project, pushed
culminated his undergraduate career through against the wishes of the
with election to the position of class major college faculties, will afford
athlete, an opportunity for the administraton
Joseph' E. Brunswick to aiply its advanced educational
Who ran that nasty little humor ideas and ideals. Next year will see
column on the -editorial page this the definite formation of this plan.
year. le acted in the capacity of one All of these things spell progress,
of the three assistant city editors last and progress in no small measure.
year, and consequently enjoyed his The student body itself can contri-
first experience of work as Rolls edi- bute to the general good during its
tor. vacation period, with only a small
And Finally output of energy, by proselyting
.lo llubbnrd Chamberlin among high school graduates to see
Last and most important-the re- that Michigan received the best of
tiring managing editor. Shortly he this group in its freshman class next
intends to embark for England fall. Along this same line, the stu-
though this fact has no relation to dents who live in Michigan can do
the quality of The Daily during the much to promote the feeling in favor
past year. Leading man in the Uni- of their University in their home com-
versity movie and otherwise famous, munities-a feeling which may aid in
he rose to the pinnacle of popular the bi-ennial battle for legislative
esteem as one of the charter mem- appropriations next spring.
hers ofethe local chapter of Phi Eta The work of all forces, in a com-
Sigma. No other honor society is mon direction, exerted for the com-
complete without him. mon end, can not help but leave Mich-
"Thanks for working, boys." igan in the spring of 1929 at a level
Ecorrespondingly higher as 1928 is to
THlE UNION 1927.
The action of the board of directors j
of the Union, taken yesterday in re- TrI POLITICAL SITUATION
jecting the vote on the proposed
amendment for the Union constitu- With the Republican national con-
ion which would have made the pres- vention less than* three weeks away
Mency and the recording secretary- and the Democratic convention sched-
hip appointive position, is both de- uled for but a little later in the suin-
fensible ant iexplicable. Even the mer, it would seem that in this last
most ardent proponents of the mea- issue of The Daily a few comments
ure admitted that fraudulent votingm.o
an riot at the Thursday night meet- tightnweesexpressedlonathe seltc
ng; nd hil a arg potio ofthetion of nominees who will carry party
ng; and while a large portion of the standards in the November elections.
tudent body would have been glad The party of the opposition sincee
.o see the proposal accepted, the re-1
ection of the vote can hardly be1921, the democrats have been forced
ectionofthe. bie a position where it now appears
bem.an.d.. (that their only chance for success lies
Tpe whole situation, however, 11i the nomination of Governor Al
whereby 600 members are required to I Smith. A good vote getter and na-
e present to vote on any proposed tionally popular, Mr. Smith is both
hange in the Unioh constitution, is Catholic and we . Whith is to
pen to very vulnerable points of at-C and wet. While the first two-.
I attributes certainly will not hurt him
ack. With the general apathy of the .
m i the eyes of the convention, it is
tudent body, and the more and more probably just as likely that his views
pparent lack of interest in the Union prohibition will lead to oppos-
vhich that student body evidences, it p b nep
tion in the dry South, and there can
as become practically impossible tor
be no question that his religion which
et 600 students to attend any Union t
et 600 sdenr tpottendany rth should not be an issue will prove to
reetlng, however important, for the be one in any contest in which he may
mendment of the Union constitution. be enteredm
To reduce the required number for be entered.
quorm, hweve, wold b ex-It must not necessarily be granted,
Squorum, however, would be ex-I however, that because these questions
remely dangerous. To allow one or
wo hundred students, which is the are raised that they will prove detri-
verage turnout to these meetings, to mental to the Smith cause as it is .
un the affairs of the organiation quite probably that they would prove
a strength rather than a weakness.
ould be Very perilous. To allow vot- It mst also be remembered that Mr.
ng at a polling booth, however, it s posesse ofmamgreat e .
hroughout an afternoon or perhaps Smith is possssed of a great deal of
or a whole day on ronoehaps strength in his home state, New York,
r a hol da onproposed amend-
ients of this kind, is neither danger- and in all probability would succeed
us nor difficult to introduce, and in transfering that state's 45 elector-
al votes to the democratic column,
robably presents the logical solution something which nocpaty, seekiun
or the present difficulty.smessingnwhich notpary, seeknge
To get 600 votes registered on a success, can afford to ignore.
roposition ty this method would In the Republican party, on they
other hand, Herbert Hodver appears
robably be comparatively simple, aso
as the wisest selection. Undoubtedly n
evidenced by the spring all-campus a
lections. The farce of the so-called t he popular choice
torate, he also appears as the onlyr
'nion meetings would by this sys-
em be abolished, and the student body Republican certain of victory in the
ould have an opportunity at the same event that Smith is named as the dem-
ime to expressits opinon on the ocratic nominee. His chief rivals,
uestions brought before it. Lowden and possibly Dawes, hardly
The board of directors has acted, seem strong enough candidates for the
robably in line with the only sane ace while the renomination of Cool-

ourse which was open to them, in the rnge would be most unfortunate.
efecting of the balloting of Thurs- Not a particularly outstanding pres-
ident, Coolidge can hardly be said to
ay night. Such flagrant fraud, evendt
the Union, is scarcely to be toler-
ted, and the root of the evil is far I the history of his office. Much better
ore firmly entrenched than the for the interest of the party and of
hursday night fiasco would indicate. the country, it would seem that he
here has not been a quorum present should step aside in favor of someone
here. hasthot beer avauorumepresen-
t a Upion meeting in at least two else. Of the other available candi-
ears, and while proxy votes have cov- dates, the secretary of commerce pre-r
red up the deficiency heretofore, and sents himself as the logical nomine.
'hile there has been no protest here- To choose any other, might prove a
fore, the farce had to end sometime party mistake which later events
-and it apparently has ended, to the would make regrettable.
enefit of all concerned. To recapitulate, at this writing,
Smith is undoubtedly the logical'
TIE END OF THE YEAR choice and apparently the only sanel
With this issue The Daily ceases one for the democratic convention.,
ublication, with the exception of the j To oppose him, the Republicans willC
ummer issues, until next fall. Be- probably be forced to select Hoover, l
des adding another number after no other candidate as yet appearingE
he "Volume" sign on the front page, worthy of the office. The suggestedE
nd besides being the end of the col- alternative that President Coolidge -be
ngiate careers of a large number of drafted, moreover, is also undesira-
eniors who have carried a heavy ble. He has served six years, already,;
ortion of the burden of campus ac- and hardly seems deserving of an ad-
vities, the end of the year means ditional four years. In additjon he has
he end of an entire period of student distinctly pointed out that he does
bought and the beginning of a new "not choose to run." All of which
ne. I would seem to indicate that there is
At the opening of school last fall I no logical reason for calling him from
he automobile ban seemed to be the an apparently desired retirement.
aramount issue of the campus; and
o it has remained practically CREDIT WHERE DUE
hroughout the year. No prognostica- This task is easy. It is simply re-
ons can be made, of course, but it cognizing merit where it has long been
entirely possible that for one rea- due. The fine way in which most of
.. .a _.__ _. i .: _ 11 . _ :. .:.. . .. _ ! 7 . . .4 , .--, _ s __ _ _.-__ ._ - _ .t -_

r I _ _e_.._._ a_

* * *
They had a little argument in the
sixth inning, over Whitmore's sup-
posed balk. "You can't tell me wheth-l
er he was on the rubber or not," hiss-
ed umpire Awfully Green to the en-
raged Harvard team, "I know a balk
when I see one. I have played bil-
liards for ten years."
* * * ru nIi
The only Crimson run in the
sixth inning was when the battle
of century started in the first
base bleachers and one of the
fellows took a sok on the nose. J
* * *
As official Rolls sports editor, we
sat in the press box yesterday and
ate peanuts and drank pop. The only
trouble with watching the game from
the hawk's nest up on top of the
grandstand is the fact that we al-
ways were ducking foul balls. If you
want to experience a real sensation,
try bending your neck suddenly to
dodge a ball while you are swallow-
ing a mouthful of pop and peanuts.
* * *
The little snake dance that
formed behind the band after the
game yesterday probably was
worth ten swing-outs of the type
held this spring.. The'- "swing.
out" held yesterday at leat gave
proof to the fact that there still
remains active a portion of the
all-together-too-dormant Mi heiignni
spirit.
* * *
If all the Campus Bluehooks wPre
collected and placed in a pile, they1
probably would burst into flames -
or else form a big pool of water. }
* * *

f
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I

HIT
Well, llarvard, you made a
valiant effort, and that red-headed
Donaghy at shorislop was a
streak, but it takes home runs to
winl huil gamnes.

1

!J."./" ". I."ro.I"./!+/"J"r/1I"l~ i"s "~"./"./"./.".s+....~./,%.'s".r.I'././"."rI°.I",~" +".~.. i+";r'''J

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During. Su.mer S choolt.

Breakfast

Luncheon

Dinner

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Chicken Dinner Sunday
MRS.,ANNA KALMBACH,

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........................... .................. .....................
I WEEK WoodArd, at Eliot NIG H TS
Beginning 79e, $1.50
MONDAY 11 ors tel1Mats. Tues.,
Thur. and Sat.,
,rrAY 2
P L A Y it 0 U S I "4c, 7ie
I5
Noel Coward's Delightful Comedy played with great
success at the Biltmore Theatre, N. Y.
hM u
witht
CLARA CLEMENS
(Mrs. Ossip Gabrilowitsch) =
as Guest Star x
"Pleasant and unforgetfiiI at the theatre."-N Y. Times
"It is excellent all the way thlroiighi."
--Alan Dale, r. Y. American
I;.

Last night we had ourf
movie. You know, the same
that had been running at
Michigan all week. Praise
Student Council from wihom
blessings flow.
* * *

free
011*e
t ie
the
all

I

I'

We wonder how many season pas-
es were given for the selection of I
the picture that big-hearted Butier-
field gave free, gratis, and gracious J
to the student body last night. I
Still, all tlhe student,, do for
Butterfield is to support his movie
house and the other two or three
dumps where lie screens films of
varying quality. After all, what
we have done to deserve a free
mnovie, let alone a picture that
hasn't been shown. Ihere before?
Ifluph!
We suppose that our public has not-
ed that we have kicked that terrible
Music and Drama column out of the l
paper entirely for the rest of the
year. It was a question whether or
not Rolls or that eighteen inch strip
of persiflage would run, and of course
right, dignity, and prestige won out.
* * *
A -'lot of questions have been
coming into the office, asking what
has become of Three Star, that
1bhhk-hafred beauty (Oh boy, but
we're 'gOing to give him a ride!)
who is famous, now that he has
made they Camius IBlnebook. Three
Star myste'rro-sly disappeared
from towu-a the day before the
booklet came out. Of course, that
has nothing' to do with his disap-
pearance. But we wonder.
* *4 *
We print the following telegram,
received just ten minutes ago:
WINDSOR ONT
May 26
1053P Z164 32
LARK CARE OF ,DAILY
ANN ARPOR MICH
FORCED TO LEAVE TOWN FOR !
INDEFINITE PERIOD OF TIME
STOP PUT OUT COLUMN FOR REST '
OF YEAR STOP, GIVE QUOTE{
HARVE UNQUOTE EMERY 'PARTING
SHOT IN LAST ISSUE STOP I AM
SOBER HICAND VERY HAPPY ENDI
OF MESSAGE
SIGNED THREE STAR

QGood
Food
Prompt
Service
MLunch,
State Street

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One -iiord more. Don't forget
that we are editing Rolls in 'the
Suminer Michigan IDliy. Watch
for our first appearance in the
commnencement extras. If you
wantto follow our daily account
of the - trials and tribulations of
Professor hobbs' Greenland. ex- I
pedition. SUBSCRIBE TO THE
SUMMER 311CHIGAN DAILY, ANN
ARBOR'S 0 NLY 310tN ING
NEWIAPER.
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