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May 23, 1928 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-23

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Jr

01w A

I aiti

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 176. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 1928.

EIGHT P

MEMS WILL VOTE
TOMORROW ON UNION
!MERIT SYSTEM ISSUE
PROPOSED AMENDMENT COMES
AS MOVE FOR FAIRER
UNION REGIME
BOARD TO NAME OFFICERS
Change Must Recele Two-Thirds Vote
Of Those Present; At Least
600 Must Attend
Coming as the culmination of a
number of steps leading to the estab-
lishment of the Union government up-
on a, sounder foundation than ever
before, the merit system of selecting
the president and recording secretary
of the organization will be submitted
to male students of the University for
adoption at an assembly to be he
at 7:30 o'clock tomorow night in the
Union ballroom.
Under the proposed amendment, it
is planed that the president and re
cording secretary of the Union now
selected by popular vote at the all-
campus elections held each spring will
be appointed by the newly create
board of directors of the Union estat
lished by the adoption of an amend
ment earlier in the year.
This new board of directors includ-
es the president :of the Union, the
recording secretary, the six vice pres-
continue to be elected at the all-cam-
pus election, three members of the
Union, the secretary of the Alumni
association, and one member of the
Board of Regents of the University.
To Curtail Polities
The amendment is being proposed
with a view to taking the two offices
out of campus politics as' they are in
reality much too administrative and
technical in capacity to really be pro-
perly filled by a popular vote. It will
mean instead that a system very much
the same as that employed by the
Board In Control of Student Publica-
tions will be adopted.
Such a move is based upon the
belief that it is very possible under
the present system for a man not de-
serving the ofice to be put in the
place not because of any particular
°j lrt but bec ie' f his
own capacity for securing a strong
vote in the elections. And it is plan-
ned instead that the members of the
Board shall be fully acquainted with
each man working on the Union com-
mittees aid possess an individual
knowledge of the man's peronality
and4 capabilities.
This plan has been sglested as
particularly workable with a view to
placing each one of the vice presidents
in a more responsible position insofar
as his relations to the Union are con-
cerned and thus placing each one
irn position to be more thoroughly
acqainted with each of the men ap-
plying for the two offices.
It is probable that ,nder the pro-
posed plan the president and record-
ing secretary will make written re-
commendations to the board giving in
detail the qualifications and wcrk of
each much 'as the managing editors
and business managers of the publi-
cations do in making recommenda-
tions to the Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications. If adopted it will
go into effect with the selection of the
officers next spring who will run the
Union for the following year.
In order to be adopted it is nec-
essary that 600 members be present
at the assembly and that the amend-
ment reecive two-thirds of the votes
cast or at least 400 of the 600 bal-
lots.I
Name Organization Comnittee
An organization committee consist-
ing of William V. Jeffries, grad-, pres-
ident of the Union for the past year;
Prof. H. C. Anderson, head of the me-
chanical engineering department; and

Archie W. Diack, '29D, was named
from the Board of Directors more
than two months ago after Jeffries'
had brought student opinion favorable
to the change to the attention of the
Board.
The committee, after considering
the new system, reported themselves
as unanimously in favor of a change
to the merit system and a week later
it was endorsed, again unanimously,
by the Board of ;Directors.
One change in the proposed plan
as reported by the committee '.was
made by the board of directors before
endorsing it. By this change, it is
proposed that the entire board rather
than seven members will meet in
making the appointments because of
the greater range of judgment which
will be brought to bear in consider-
ing the applicants.
As a result, eight studentmembers
will sit on the board in comparisor
with the three which were slated for
the original group. Five alumni and
faculty men were also added to the

GARGOYLE'S
TO APPEAR

COMM
ON CA

Michigan's humor magazine, thr
Gargoyle, will make its final appear-
ance of the current college year to-
day when the June issue appears on
sale on the campus. This number is
dedicated to the seniors and is entitled
"Commencement Number." Final ex-
aminations and college exercises in
general are also used as the subjects
of humorous treatment.
The effervescent "Lichty" bobs into
the spotlight again this month with
several new art creations. His feat-
ured drawings of the issue are "A
Prizefighter Writes His Memoirs,"
"The Gymnast Goes to the Movie," and
"Freedom of the Press."
Al yyse is the designer of the cover
of the month which is done in green
and looks to the river and canoeing
along with other things. Other ar-
tists featured this month are Jerry
TO HOLD TRADITIONAL
SENIOR SING TONIGHT

ENCEMENT NUMBER
.MPUS SALE TODAY
Ellison, Kenneth Holmes, Margaret
Gentz and James Trott.
Among the literary features this
month are "The Perfect Swingout," by
William Emery, "I'd Rather Be Left
Than President," by William Hillyer,
and "The Listening Ear," a review of
the latest records by Gurney Williams,
Jr.

RESIGNS

PRESIDENCY

KENYON BUTTERFIELD

Of MICHIGAN STATE

RESIGNATION IS ACCEPTED
UNANIMOUS VOTE OF
BOARD

BY

Give Sing
cert By

In Conjunction With Con.
Varsity Band Scheduled
For Tonight

WILL MEET AT BANDSTAND
Seniors of all schools and colleges
of the University will meet at 7 o'clock
tonight around the newly erected
bandstand for the traditional Senior
Sing. Seniors are expected to wear
caps and gowns. The sing will be
given in conjunction with the concert
by the Varsity band which is .:ched-
uled for tonight.
The event will begin promptly at 7
o'clock when the first concert selec-
tion will be given by the band. Michi-
gan songs will be sung by the Seniors
during the intervals between instru-
mental selections on the land concert
program. Th entire affair will prob-
ably last not more than an hour and
a half.
Original plans made by the commit
tee headed by Thomas H. Fitzpatrick,
All seniors are requested to
meet in their caps and gowns at
( 7 o'clock tonight around theE
band-stand on the campus for
Sthe S'enior Sing.
'28, included several sings, but incle-
ment weather has prevented any ga-
therings previous to this time. To-
night's will be the only sing of the
year because of the approaching ex-
amination period. The committee re-
quests that all who can possibly at-
tend report promptly so that the pro-
gram may be finished as early as pos-
sible.

The seniors find themselves in for
a bit of razzing in a featured editorial
pointing out the deplorable weakness-
es of seniors. Among the shorter lit-
erary features of the issue are some
clever skits by Alexander Gage, Jr.,
Edwin Fisher Forbes, and William
Hillyer.
The books review included: "Boo-
jum," by Charles Wertenbaker, "Old
Swords," by Val Gielgud, "The River
Between," by Louis Forgione, "Daisy
and Daphne," by Rose Macaulay, and
"The Siamese Cat," by Leon Under-
wood.
And probably bigger than any other
feature of the book is the fact that for
the first time in more than 20 years
its has changed its price and go on
sale today at 15 cents a copy. This
marks a reduction of 10 cents in the
price of individual copies and if it
is successful in securing a hoped for
increase in sales will be continued
through next year, according to Gar-
goyle editors.
Gargoyle has enjoyed a peculiar year
for the most part starting slowly and
making its feature hit of the year
in the "Liberty" issue which endeav-
ored in many ways to be a take off of
the magazine, Liberty, and succeed-
ing, it may be said, very well-
It also gained distinction when one
of its artists, Maurice Litchtenstein
'29, reecived a $,000 first prize in a
national art contest sponsored by Col-
lege Humor.
NEW CATALOGUE OVV
IN LITERARY COLEGE
Edition For 1928-1929 Contains Usual
Features Although More
Compact, Smaller
NEW MUSEUM DESCRIBED
The official catalogue for 1928-29 of
courses offered in the College of Liter-
ature, Science, and the Arts may be
procured at the Registrar's office, ac-
cording to a recent announcement. In-
cluded in it are all the regular fea-
tures of former catalogues, listing the
courses offered and the instructors.
The book is more compact this year
and smaller than previously.
Courses offered in the various de-
partments ane listed alphabeticvlly
with the individual subjects listed by
their numbers. Several new topics
will be taught for the firs~t time next
year, and several departments form-
erly listed separately have now been
combined in the catalogue. The
journalism department is listed under
the Rhetoric department, while the
public speech :department appears
under the ti-tle of "'Speech."
The front of the catalogue i's de-
voted to suggested curriculas in var-
ious schools leading to degrees and
certificates. A special section is de-
voted to ta description of the facilities
of the new Museum which will be open
in time for the coming tkrm. iA
school calendar and a map of the city
of Ann Arbor showing the location of
all campu's buildings is also contained
in the issue.j
According the school calendar, the
academic year of 1928 will begin on
Sept. 17, 1928, with registration and
Freshmen week held before hand.
School will be out in the Spring
shortly following Memorial day,
Commencement exercises being held
on June 17. Vacations listed include
Thanksgiving day, Christmas, Wash-
ington's birthday, Spring vacation and
Memorial day.
SENIOR SWING-OUT
WILL BE STUDIED
BY FACULTY MEN
In hopes of restoring Swing-out to
its former place of dignity and solem-

nity among Michigan's traditions, a
committee of three faculty members,
was appointed yesterday by the Com-
mittee of Student Affairs to make a
study of the problems which have
arisen in connection with the annual
senior promenade and exercises in
Hill auditorium. The committee, con-
sisiting of Prof. A. G. Ruthven of the
zoology department, Prof. H. C. And-
erson of the mechanical enginreering
department, and J. A. 3ursley, dean
of students, will confer from time to
time with such studentrcommittees as
may be raised.

SHAW NAMEDSUCCESSOR
Was Formerly Agriculture Dean And
Three Times Acting President
Of Institution
(By Associated Press)
EAST LANSING, May 22-The res-
ignation of Dr. Kenyon L. Butterfield
as president of Michigan State college
today was accepted by the state board
of agriculture by unanimous vote. The
resignation is effective immediately
with salary continued to January 1,
1929.
Robert F. Shaw, veteran dean of
agriculture, who has been serving as
acting president of the institution for
the third time, was elevated to the
~presidency. J. R. McCall, Detroit
member of the board, left the session
before the vote on the new president
in order to catch a train.
Resignation Prepared Earlier
The resignation of President Butter-
field was prepared earlier in the week.
Clark L. Brody, member of the board
from Lansing, visited the president's
home this afternoon and returned with
the resignation.
No statements were made either by
Dr. Butterfield or the board. The res-
ignation read:
"I hereby resign as president of the
Michigan State college of agriculture
and applied science."
On motion of Mrs. Dora Stockman,
East Lansing, the resignation was ac-I
cepted with the following statement:
"The state board of agriculture ac-
cepts the resignation of Pres. Kenyon1
L. Butterfield, effective today, May 22,
with salary continued to January 1,
1929.
Mr. Shaw later appeared before. the
board and accepted the presidency.
"There are greater problems con-
fronting the institution than ever be-
fore in my 26 years of experence," he
dleclared in his aeptance. "The pres-
idency is a radical change from my
plans for later life, but if I can be
of sny ervie to the Institution, 1I
am glad to do so."
M. B. McPherson, Lowell, made the
motion for the selection of Shaw as
the new president. It was seconded
by Mr. Brody.
Board Ends Administration
Action of the board today marked 1
the complete fall of the Butterfield ad-
ministration. It began to topple in
April when the board ousted three
members of the faculty and friends of
Dr. Butterfield from the payroll and
extended the president's leave of ab-
sence to July 1, without his consent.
The three faculty members who serv-
ice expired July 1, by the elimination
of their departments are John E. Will-
ard, director of continuing education;
John Phelan, dean of the college of
education; and Ross W. Mayer, as-
sistant to the president.
The first controversy between the
lboard and Dr. Butterfield came in Feb-
ruary when the financial control of the
institution was taken out of his hands.
A new budget prepared under the
direction of the board not only made
the sweeping elimination in the col-
lege staff, but also heavily reduced
salaries in the face of recommenda-
tions of the president for an increase
of $135,000. The president was in the
Holy land when the new budget was
being prepared but he was notified of
the probable changes before his de-
l parture.
RFOR CLAS S TO HOLDI
MOrK ELECTION TODAY
Senior class mock elections will be
held at 4 o'clock today in room 25
Angell hall, it was announced last
Snight by Robert Leland, president of
the Senior literary class. According
to tradition 'the recipients Pf the
left handed honors will be elected.
At this time the following officers
will be balloted for: Most bashful
boy, class barby, class bluffer, class
,handshaker, man with the biggest

lime, class politician, class vamp, most
popular girl, biggest woman hater,
most bashful girl, best man student,
best woman student, and class ath-
lete.
At a late hour last night it was an-
nounced that a few more honorary of-
fices might be inaugurated, including
the class 'shiek. There was some
doubt expressed, however, as to the
advisability of the creation of such an
joffice.

WORK ON OPERA FO
WELL UNDER 1
Work for the 1928 Michigan Union
Opera has been continuing with great
enthusiasm in all departments of the
production since the original meet-
ing of those concerned more than a
week ago, according to Dalton D- Wal-
per, '29, general chairman.
Embryonic men's and women's cho-
ruses under the guidance of Roy Hoy-
er, leading man with Fred Stone in
I "Criss-Cross," have been training
faithfully several hours a day, learn-
ing new routines, planned especially
by Hoyer for the 1928 edition of the
Opera.
An unusually large number of books
have already been submitted to Donal
Hamilton Haines of the journalism
department, and numerous other as-
pirants are completing their plans for
the honor of writing the book for the
Opera. The books are said to be var-
ied in character and to offer a large
field of ideas from which to choose
for presentation next winter.
Tryouts are now being arranged for
all those interested in writing the mu-
sic for the 1928 Opera so that they
may present samples of their music
to the committee in charge. Anyone
'SENIOR CLASS HONOR
GUARD IS APPOINTED!
Graduating Class President Announc-
es 63 Appointments To Honorary
Escort Section

who has not already done so who
wished to submit his music should
communicate with Roy S. Langham of
the School of Music at once for an
appiontment as he plans to hear the
suggestions tomorrow.
In addition, all men who want to try
out for leading parts in the coming
presentation should get in touch with
Langham so that arrangements can
be made for a hearing by him.
As yet the chairman of the various
committees including the program and
publicity committee have not been
definitely selected, but announcement
will be made within the near future
as to the choice of those in charge.
VARSITY TENNIS TEAM
OVEHbVHELMS CHICAGO>
Wolverine Netmen Win Eight Matches
Out of Nine In Final Dual
Meet Of Season
BARTON DEFEATS BU D D
Losing only one match of the nine
the Michigan Varsity tennis team ov-
erwhelmed Chicago yesterday at the
Windy city. This was the closing team
match of the year for the Chicago
men, but they could not stand before,
the powerful playing of the Wolver-
ines. Michigan closed its dual match

BASEBALL
BE

'LEADS GRADUATE PARADE season with only one loss, that from
RIllinois and will enter the Conference

TEAM HAS YET
DEFEATED IN
BIG TEN

)R NEXT YEAR
WAY, SAYS W ALPER

MICHIGAN REGISTEFLVN~jTAG
CONFERENCE VICTOI

Appointments to the Honor GuardI
of the Senior Class in the College ofi
Literature, Science, and the Arts were
announced yesterday by Robrt Leland,r
president of the graduating class. The1
students chosen number 63, and will
march at the head of the Commence
ment procession with the Honor;
Guards chosen from the various oth-
er schools and colleges of the Uni-
versity, escorting the honor section.
of the parade to the cermonies. Tha1
honor section is composed of the far
ulties of the several schools and col-
leges, regents of the University, Uni-
versity officials, and candidates for,
honorary degrees.,
The. list of seniors chosen from the
Literary college follows:
William C. Pusch, Martin Garber.
William Edwards, L. Keith Goodric i,
John L. Wilson, James C. Hughey, '1,.
HaroldFitzpatrick, Robert C. Hann:
losee, Charles Van Arnam, Bennie, G.
Oosterbaan,bCourtland C. Smith, Carl
Tjisted, Robert Leland, Lorne Poo;le,
John Herrick, Clarence W. Little, John
Ottoway, William T. Barbour, Williamj
B. Wildanger, William Ramsey, Frauk
Wachter, Hepry S. Grinnell, Thomas
G. Conlon, Francis Roehm, Dales A.
Knapp, :William D. Brumbaugh, J.
Albert Roesch, 'John Cunninih am
John H. Crosby, Jo. H. Chamberlin.
George H. Annable, Rand E. Wint.-
ers, David Monroe, Samuel E. Gawne,
John Bobrink, Arthur Grigg, Seeley.
Chapman, Norman Gable, Richard Lu-
tes, William C. Campbell, Addison
Connor, John Glover, Fred Fuller,
John W. Rice, Ellis Merry, Thomas
Dougall, Louis Gilbert, Wayne Brown-
ell, Bryan Hunt, Raymond Read, Her-
man Z. Nyland, Bruce Tyndall, Charl-
es Humphrey, George W. Douglas,
Herbert V. Douglas, Wilbur E. Petrie,
Robert Shambaugh, Edward C. Trem-
ble, Carlton Champe, Mat Hudson, In-
man Munger, DeLeslie L. Alien, Sam
Wettlaufer.
FEAR DEATH FOR
ENTOMBED MINERS

THE UNION AMENDMENT
Editor's Note:
In order that members of the Mich-
igan Union may fully acquaint them-
selves with the proposed amendments
to the Union constitution which will
be voted on at an assembly to be held
at 7:~30 o clock Thursday night, the
Daily is publishing here with a complete
text of the proposed amendments.
(1) Change Article IV, Sec-
tion one, paragraph one, to read
-as follows-The President of the
Union and Its Recording Secre-
tary, to be students, ex-officio, to
be appointed by the Board of
Directors as hereinafter provided
for.
(2) Under Article IV add the
following-The Board of Direc-
tors shall, on the Saturday pre-
ceding the all-Campus elections,
appoint, by a majority of vote of
the entire Board, a President and
Recording Secretary of the
Union.
(3) Under Article XII Sec-
tion I, paragraph two, leave out
the words "at least two candi-
dates for President and Record-
ing Secretary and for each of the
Vice-Presidents, five in all."
Insert the words "at least two
,candidates for each of the Vice-
Presidents, six in all."
(4) Under Article XII, Section
II, leave out the words "may
nominate a candidate or candi-
dates for any or all such offices"
and add the words "may nomin-
ate a candidate or candidates
for Vice-president.,
(5) Article XIII, Gection I,
leave out the words "President,
Recording Secretary and five
Vice-Presidents" and add "six
Vice-Presidents."
(6) Article XIII, Section II,
| leave out the words "each mem-
I h pr -h thUion shall he entitl-

Meet the end of this week as one of1
the favorites.
Captain Barton, playing number
one, defeated Budd who holds a like
position for the Chicago team i
straight sets, 6-3, 6-3. Barton has lost
only one match this season, that be-
ing to Illinois.Bob Heaney, Michigan's
sophomore flash, had a great battle
with his opponent, Callahan, but man-
aged to pull the match, out of the fire
in three sets, 6-3, 5-7, 6-1. Heaney's
strong forhand was the deciding fac.
tor in his match yesterday, and it
pulled him through in great style.
Nelson of Chicago won the only
match for his team when he defeated.
Graham, a sophomore, in two sets
one 6-4 and the other 8-. 'hs sec-
ond set was a battle all the way and
the outcome was always In doubt.
Algyer played perhaps the best ten-
nis of his intercollegiate career as he
swamped Iesser 6-0, 4. Algyer
played an a.II round brilliant game,
but looked te best at the net, where
he made many spectacular shots.
Schaefer continued the winning
streak when he overwhelmeld his op-
ponent, Hebert, by a s fr OL 6-0, 6-2,
and was followed by Brody -who de-
feated Roters 6-0, 6-4. Brody is a new
comer in Michigan tennis circles.
In the .doubles matches the result'
was as conclusive as in the singles.
The first match ended with Barton
and Moore on the long end of the
score of 6-4, 6-2. Algyer and Hetaney
were hard-er pressed in their seond
set after taking the first 6-1, an had
to be content with a decision 6-1,
8-G.
Brody and Graham, the last Mich-
igan doubles team staged a great
comeback and took the second and
third sets of their match 6-2, 6-1 after
losing the fir'st 3-6.
The members of the tennis team hot
entered in the Conference meet will
return immediately "hile the others,
probably Barton and Heaney in the
singles and B'arton and Moore or
Hea'ney in the doubles, will continue
on to Purdue where the meet is to be
held.
ADELPHI WINNER
FROM ALPHA NU
Adelphi was the victor over Alpha
Nu in the annual inter-society fresh-
man debate, which was held last night
in the Alpha Nu room in Angell Hall.
The subject of the debate was "Re-
solved: That the ethics of the mod-
ern business world are incompatible
with sound morality." Adelphi, repre-
sented by Lawrence Hartwig, '31, Carl
Urist, '31, and Nathan Levy, '31, debat-
ed for the affirmative.
Lyle Chubb, '31, A. F. Donohue,
and F. Boesche, of Alpha Nu, main-.
tained the negative. As a result of the
debate, the winners gain possession
of the oratorical association cup, the
contest for which, by the freshmen
teams, provides the only competition
between these two debating societies.
Edward Robinson, '30L, was judge of
th .contest.
WILL LIFT AUTO
BAN JUNE NINTH
Accordin t oa nnnnemen mde

CONQUERS OHIO 13 TO
Oosterbaan Leads Batting Attack Wi
Home Run, Triple, And
Two Singles
Michigan won its eleventh straig
conference baseball game 13-9, ov
Ohio State yesterday afterno
The game was featured by the terril
hitting of Bennie Oosterbaan and
the erratic fielding of the Michig
team. Bennie in four times at bat
a home run, a triple, and two singl
besides working a base on balls, a
stealing 'a base.
The loose fielding of the Michig
team was undoubtedly due to the
cent shift in the infield lineup, whi
was ca'used by the a'sence of Cl
tain Loos.
Corriden opened the third inni
with a single, and Oosterbaan, w
was next at bat, tripled scoring C
riden. Weintraub then singled
score Bennie. McCoy came up to t
plate and doubled, bringing lin We:
raub and anotherrun. Reichman w
safe when Hinchman of Ohio Sti
dropped his fly ball, McCoy goi
down to third on the play. Asbe
then drove out a searing single, ena
ing McCoy to get home safely on t
play. Asbeck and Reichman who w
then on base were sacrificed alo
Straub went out as Rechman scor
and Asbeck added another marker
Michigan's score in this big inn
when he got home from third
Lange's hit.
The Ohio State teamn hit Asbeck fr
y and with the very poor suport b
hind him the game was never on I
ice. Nebelung opened the game w
a sharp single to center, and Stra
went out on a hit and run play. Lar
walked, Corriden flied out to L
and Oosterbaan followed with a dr
:o the stadium for four bases. T
home run was a case of a mis-jud
fly and either Hess or Hinchman col
have caught it, but neithe? aded
catch and Hess was imediatelyr
moved from the lineup by Coach
John.
Sutton, Ohio's leading hurler, w
Shelled off the mound in the fou
inning, giving way to Klin'k, who i
in turn followed. by Sill, but the da
age was done as the four rus in
first seemed to take the heart out
the Ohio team.
A barrage of 6 runs in the third s
tIed matters for the day, but .1
Buckeye team fought a game upl
fight in their effort to tie the sc
in the closing frames. They used
men in this atempt, but' failed to ti
the tide of battle their way.
Barnes and Rieh, Ohio's two le
?ng hitters, led the offense for 1
Buckeyes with three and to hits
spectively. While Oosterbaan was'
outstanding player for the Wolveri
Oosterbaan received an ovation e
time he came to bat as this was
last time he would play a collegi
game in Columbus, and though he I
been a constant nemesis to the .Bu
eye hopes they seemed loath to
him leave.
Michigan AB R H PO A
Nebelung, cf 4 2 2 2 0
Straub, 2b 6 1 2 4 3
Lange, rf 5 1 2 0 0
Corriden, ss 6 1 1 1 4
Oosterbaan, lb 4 3 4 13 1
Weintraub, 3b 3 1 1 0 4
McCoy, f 5 1 2 2 0
Reichman, c 5 1 1 4 0
Asbeck, p 5 2 3 1 4
Totals 43 13 18 27 16

'.
!

(By Associated Press.)
MATHER, Pa., May 22.-Grave fears
that death has claimed all but a hand-
ful of the 211 miners entombed in
the Math'er mine expolision seem's
likely to be borne out late tonight as'
the known death toll mounted to 92.
Hopes that had risen with the es-
cape of a lone miner today, ebbed as
hours passed and rescue crews
brought only more dead to the sur-
face. Late today there still remained
105 men unaccounted for on the basis
of a Red Cross check of the men miss-
ing rafter the explosion in this little
mining community last Saturday.
Only 14 men of those who were
down in the mine at the time of the
catastrophe were outside the workings
today, and it was believed they were
he only survivors.
WILL DISTRIBUTE
SENIOR PROGRAMS
Today will be the last day for the
distribution of the senior programs,
..4. ,.7 . s._ .Mnin ankfin

Ohio State
Perkins, If
Leo, lb
Riefil, ss
Widdifield, c
Hinchman, cf
Walters, cf
Kline, If
Genger, 2b
Barnes, rf
Summers, 3b
xSutton, p
Klink, p
Sills, p
McLaughlin, rf

1
4
5
4
2
2
1
5
5
5
1
2
1
4

0
3
1
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
0
1
0
0
9

0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
3
1
1
1
3
0
12

0
18
0
.3
0
1
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
0
26

0
0
7
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
2
2
2
0
15

n;

Totals 43
Score by innings:
Michigan
Ohio State
Summary-Two

316 102
013 201
base hits:

000-1
200-
McCo

Straub. Three base hits; Oosterbaai
Asbeck, Summers. Home run: Ooste,
baan. Sacrifice hits: Nebelung, Weit
traub. Stolen bases: Nebelung, Lang'
Oosterbaan, Riehl, 2. Struck out/ b
Klink, 1; Sills, 1; Asbeck, 4. base o
ba. uf' f iutem 1* T(1-nKi . -Aswek

I

T

1 t

1!

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