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May 12, 1928 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-12

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VAGZ FOUR
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editoria
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub.
ished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by sarner. $4.00; by mail,
r4.5a.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
Bard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 2aur4.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
10 H. CHAMBERLIN
ri.dtor .. .. .Ellis F. Merry
Rditor Michigan Weekly. Charles E. Behymer
News Editor............Phiip C. Brooks
-it) at of ortiara tk Smith !
Womens Editor Marian L. Welles
ports 9itr Herbert E. Vedder
Cheater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
\ssistant city Editor.. ,Richard C Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert ' E Finch G. Thomas McKean
. Stewart Hook Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul 1,TKern Nelson J. Smith. T
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson Sally Knox
Margaret Arthus rnhn H Maloney
Flex A. Bocnowsk Marion McDonald
ean Campbell Charles S. Monroe
Tessie Church Catherine Price
Blanchard W. Cleland Harold L. Pasman
Clarence N. EdI.. Morris W. Quinn
Wargaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
!alborg Egelane . Pierce Rosenber
Warore Pollme, rleanot Scribner
rames B Freema Corinne Schwar
Rober IJ Gessne Robert G. Silbar
aine EGrube' Howard F. Simo
le Uagelsau Ceorge G. Simon
oseph E. Howel Rowena Stillman
. Wallace Hushe Svia Stone
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilley
'Nilliam F. Kerby Bert. K. Trischeller
awrence R. Klei, Edward L. Warner, J3
)onald J' Kline Benjamin S. Washer
ck L. 'Lait, Jr Toseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
lssistant Manager.. George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising........ Richard A. Meyer
Advertising.:Edward L. Hulse
Advertising.......John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts.. . Raymond Wachter
Circulation.........George B. An, Jr.
Publication..................Harvey Talcott
Geerge Bradley Assistants
Geore Brdley Ray Hofelich
Marie Brummeler Hal A. Jaehn
lames Carpenter Jmes Jordan
Charles K. Correll MVlarion Kerr
Barbara Cromel Thales N. Lenington
Mary TDively Catherine McKinven
Bessie V. Egeland Doroty Lyons
'Una Felker Alex K. Scherer
KatherineFrohne George Spater
Douglass Fuller Ruth' Thompson
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
Helen Gross Lawrence Walkley
E. J. Hammer Hannah Wallen
Carl W. Hammer
S'ATURDAY, MAY 12, 192.
Night Editor-JOSEPH E. HOWELL
CAP NIGHT
Older by years than the hospital
whose giant, beetling brow frowned
over it last. nig .,older than the col-
lege careers .pf the graduating class-
es, and" older, even, than the very
freshmen who tossed their caps into
the roaring bon-fire is Cap Night.
Steeped in a tradition of Michigan his-
tory which makes it almost a part
of the very hillside where it occurs,
and a part of the universe which
hangs solemnly over it. Michigan has
few; more colorful or more impressive
ceremonies.
Freshmen are no longer freshmen
but sophomores,- sophomores have as-
sumed the dignity of juniors, juniors
have.entered their last year of col-
lege life, and the seniors, as a class,
are no more. It is the turn of the
college year for a University, the event
which marks the academic age of

Michigan's student body. A college
student lives but four years, and each
Cap Night is a birthday, with the
great fire serving for as many candles
as he deserves. The analogy to life
does not end here, however, for while
the freshmen view the occasion as a
merry incident, a senior class, aged'
in college years, is likely to look+
somewhat more serious upon the
flickering blaze which marks the last
outpost on their collegiate way.
To allow this ceremony to deter-f
iorate into the nominal travesty which1
overtook it last year when it was held
on South Ferry field, with no audience
but the freshmen themselves, closely
approached tragedy. One of the most
serious misfortunes which can over-
take the University is the possibility
of the decay of her traditions, and
with the apparent indifference toward
Swing-Out, the apparent neglect to
enforce the tradition of the freshmen
pot, the apparent general apathy on
the most ancient customs of the Uni-1
versity, it is refreshing to find at leastt
one tradition-Cap Night- suitably
preserved.

THE MTCHTr.AN DAYL'Y

SATTIRDAV 'MAY 12_ 1429.

sportsmanship will cause him to say
so, in print.
When I say that dozens of engineer-
ing faculty members and dozens of
responsible seniors declare the Honor
System to be remarkably successful,
I am not guessing. It is a fact. "S. T."
says, "-talk to any honest engineer
and he will tell you of the amount
of cribbing that goes on during exam
time." That is a good suggestion: It
has been done. I have talked to hun-
dreds of honest engineering students.
That is one reason why I believe the
Honor System works.
"S. T." says, "Everybody knows that
the system isn't working over there."
Except as a repetition of a certain
kind of gossip, that statement is un-
true.
"S. T." says: "They say that there
are students who plant books around
the buildings some place and go out
during an exam to get the dope. It
isn't hard to believe." To begin a
statement with "They say" marks the
mind of a gossip who is willing to
pass on slander without himself tak-
ing any responsibility for statements
made. On the other hand, no sensible
person would attempt to deny such
a statement, utterly. So to deny would
be to claim that all students are hon-
est, which is not so. The Honor Sys-
tem does not work perfectly. It never
has, anywhere, and never will. Always,
some students get into college who
are unfit to be there: unfit, because
they .do not react decently to decent
treatment.
"S. T." says: "And yet the Frosh
want to augment this cheating by in-
stalling a so-called 'honor system.'
Does "S. T." realize that by thus ques-
tioning the motives of the "Frosh"
concerned, he attacks each of them
personally and slanderously? Doeshe
realize that at other points he sim-
ilarly attacks the majority of engi-
neering students and equally ques-
tions the good sense and judgment
of over a hundred members of the
faculty, who strangely enough, em-
phatically believe in the Honor Sys-
tem? Of course, he does not realize
it. Please, "S. T.," be fair. Take at
least a little thought before going
to prinL" with a batch of loose, un-
supported, and unsupportable opin-
ions.
"S. T." is right just once in what
he has heard: he hears of one pro-'
fessor who will not teach except in
connection with the Honor System.
But "S. T." has not heard -enough. I
would like him to meet several pro-
fessors like that. If he will come over
some day, we will arrange it. Or if he
would rather not walk that far, we1
might stay in the Literary CollegeI
and meet several men there who be-
lieve in the Honor System and have
used it.
"S. T." like many others, thinks an
Honor System's purpose is to preventI
cheating. It isn't. If those who install
and participate in an Honor Systemr
do so to prevent cheating, then itt
isn't an Honor System. An Honor
System is a situation created in re-
cognition of the fact that people would
rather be decent than otherwise. Its1
primary function is to enable normal1
people to work under normal condi-
tions; to permit the large majority of
students who will respond to trustI
imposed, to have a decent opportunity
to respond. Cheating is incidental.
It will always, to some degree, be with
us. But the small progress the cheat-
er achieves by cheating should be of
so little concern to the honorable stu-
dent, in so far as it affects the hon-
est student's standing, that it does

not affect his judgment of the Honor
System or its relative success. Cheat-
ing raises but one question, and that
is the ultimate elimination of the
cheater.s
"S. T." would not himself, cheat un-t
der the Honor System. But he doest
imply his complete lack of faith in his
fellows. Does"he realize that to ex- l
press such a view is to add to the
burden of cynicism an Honor System
has to carry? And that such expres-d
sions tend definitely to break downc
the Honor System?s
The engineering Honor System isV
not perfect, but it does work very suc-
cessfully. Literary students and en-
gineering students come from the f
same homes and, the same high ;1
schools. From the raw materialsp
standpoint, why is it "impossible" to t
have an Honor System throughout
the campus? True, there would be
hard work, and difficulty. Was any P
general movement for improvement o
ever easily accomplished? b
The Honor System in the Engineer-o
ing College is not what it ought to t
be and that is why a good deal of hard
work is being done on it every year
to make it better as time goes on. But c
imperfect and incomplete as it is, t
it is so much better than anything i
else that those in the College who t
have followed it closely would em-

S 1 ALA l vll..lA * S ** ... A 1 17S L A .Ja.Lfl. A.1*16, .AQSJ.

1IOAEDROLLV
SETEN WE EKS
THEY
LAB ORED
AFTER WORKING FOR seven i
weeks, 300 of them "in shifts," the
architects had a dance last night at
the lady-barber gymnasium. Only 250
couples attended, from which we judge
that a goodly portion of the toilers, on'
seeing the result of their work, were
overcome.
THAT SCENERY WAS supposed to
represent a "terrace of Old Inca." If
the information that a certain profes-
sor of Hispanic American history giv-
es out is authentic, the land of the
Incas was quite romantic.
* * *
IT WAS SOMEWHERE near that
place that the old boy, Montezuma, had
to fill up a room as high as he could
reach with gold and other things we
call valuables.. They say, and this
is reliable, that enough fraternity pins
to fill two rooms as high as a certain
past chairman of the J-Hop could
reach, standing high on the shoulders
of a certain past captain of a Mich-
igan swim team.
* * *
ALL OF WHICH teaches us that
the fair, only fair, co-eds are greater
slave-drivers than Pizzaro, Cortez, and
all the rest of the Spaniards ever
thought of being.
* * *
BUT, BACK TO the scenery-ooh,
there were red cushions on the floor.
There were also some holes in the
wall. 'Nuff said, the cushions weren't
red and the holes weren't empty when
the heat began to tell on the dypso-
maniacs.
* * *
ONE OF THE BOYS
- "
This one was in the Opera, can't
you tell?
*,*
AGAIN, BACK TO the scenery-ooh,
and they had a contest to get the idea
for those decorations. We'd hate to see

THEATER
BOOKS
music
TONIGHT: Play Production
presents Ferenec Molnar's "The
Play's the Thing," in Mimes Thea.
ter at 8:3O."
Girls Glee Club in their annual ,
concert in the Masonic Temple
at 8 o'clock.
As a 8o&t of aperitif for the May;
Festival Palmer Christian will give
the first recital on the new organ in
Hill auditorium on Tuesday evening,
May 15, at 8:15 o'clock. As a necessary
but futile gesture the School of Music
has announced that, in order to allow
concert goers plenty of time to get
seated, the regular evening concert
time has been changed from 8 to 8:15.
A useless expedient-Ann Arbor con-
cert goers will continue to arrive
breathless and noisy fifteen minutes
after the concert has begun.
For those who have a taste for
statistics, the School of Music bulletin
is especially informing; it says "The
size of the largest pipe will be 32
feet long and approximately two feet
square, whereas the smallest pipe will
be about four inches long with the
diameter of a straw. In between are,
innumerable pipes of all lengths and
diameters, some of which are conical
in shape, some straight tubes resemb-
ling a tin.whistle; and others with a
ball at the top, while still others are
triangular and of many shapes and
forms." Sic transit $75,000. It is to
be hoped that this new instrument
has not been equipped with those
stops made popular by the movie pal-
aces because of their particular suit.
ability to the sticky, and billowing
nature of sentimental songs, and
whose tones sound like the morning
gargles of the Immortal Nine.
This particular concert is given so
that Michigan organists, who have
watched the installing of this organ
with mounting interest, will have a
separate opportunity to hear it, other
than at its formal dedication in the
first May Festival program. However,
the attendance is unrestricted and
anyone may come who likes.
The following is the program of

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NO 0DO01-NO GLOSS Ai Work Guarantecd
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Panama hats and straw hats of
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and outside bands. Fancy bands
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See us for youner iw Panama,
halit. We buy them Ill the rough
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them up ourselves. A fine hat
for $7.00 and $8.00.
Felt Hat Sale now on. All of
our hats are equal in quality to
the best hats made.
FACTORY HAT SHOP "
_ 617 Paekard St. Phone 7115.
(Where I) . 1.,I Stops at State)
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the other designs, in the first place;
furthermore, what if they had been
hard-pressed for time. Seven weeks!
For further details, see the extra sec-
tion of this noozepaper.
CAP NIGHT
ANYHOW, WE CAN'T GIVE the
boys at the May Party all the space.
While they were dancing, the fresh-
men were engaged in throwing awa y
their pots.
* * *
THERE WAS A FIRE 'neverything
over at Sleepy Hollow. And while the
Headless Horseman was chasing ater
lehabod Crane to the tune of "Where,
Oh 1vliere, Are the Verdant Fresh-
nen?" one out of every litteen of the
pots managed to fall int. the blaze.
* * *
HOT STUFF
OuLOM'f
Fanned by the hot air from the
speakers' stand, the fire got so hot
that they had to call Colonel Charlie
to put it out. But the words of Bo
Chamberlin and Cathcart Smutz mere-
ly added fuel to the flames.
* * *
AFTER IT WAS all over, they all;
dashed over to Hill, auditorium to
crash the movies. On finding no re-
sistance they all left. What's a movie
without tear-gas?
* * *
THIS FOR THE freshman boys -
from Polonius Jeb-"Don't go out now
and lose your heads along with your
pots and think you amount to some-'
thing."
* * *
SENIORS HAVE THEIR Swing-Out;
freshmen, their Cap Night; the fair,
nly fair, yearling coeds, their Lan-'
ern Night. Why not have a joint soph-
omore-junior Swig-Night or some-'
thing of the sort?1
* * *
AT LEAST THE council deserves
credit, if not for other things, for get-
ing the affair to be held back where
t belongs. We really feel sorry for
he class of '30.-
* * *

Mr. Christian's recital:
Eric DeLamarter soloists.
Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C
-Bach
Landscape in Mist.......Karg-Elert
Scherzo...................Gigout
Choral in A'minor.........Franck
Cantabile (Symphony IV)
Cantilene (Symphony "Romane")
-Widor
Final (Symphony "Gothique")
Mr. DeLamarter
Address by representative of the
Board of Regents, followed by re-
sponse by Mr. Ernest M. Skinner, the
builder of the organ.
Prelude.................Saint-Saens
Up the Saguenay ...........Russell
The Fountain (A Chinese Garden)
-DeLamarter
Cradle Song ................. Held
Finale (Symphony I) ......... Vierne
* * *
"Money Writes," by Upton Sinclair;
New York; Albert and Charles Boni:
Having finished with the press, pul-
pit, and schools, Upton Sinclair .turns
his weapons upon literature and dis-
covers in the literary woodpile the
identical dusky gentleman whom he
found in all the other timber heaps.
For the benefit of the illiterati allow
me to explain that the aforesaid dus-
ky gentleman is Capitalism. The de-
sign of every contemporary writer,
from Anderson to Wright is to give the
glad hand to this prospering, or fail-
ing, depending on whether you take
an upper or lower berth, young gentle-
man. "Take,, for instance, Mr. Men-
cken," says Sinclair, "he has always
had his cocktail and always intends to
have it." Hence "The American Mer-
cury" with its arsenical green covers
is the tool of the liquor interests. And
Mencken, being devoted to the return
of the saloon, is on their payroll. Like-
wise, Sinclair Lewis is a fellow-work-
man because "Elmer Gantry" takes a
slap at the prohibition laws.
Poets he dismisses with a shrug.
Amy Lowell bought her reputation.
Edwin Arlington Robinson is lacking
in social sense, hence-to the junk
heap. Nor do the critics escape cas-
tigation. They are told that they have
been bought by the capitalists. Accord-
ingly their criticism defends capital-
ism while detracting proleterian ef-
forts.
Upton Sinclair's sincerity cannot be
doubted. Neither may his opinions be
dismissed with a complacent shrug.

F

. .--
_ -.

I

frozen desserts, frozen
salads, chilled bever-
ages - electric refrig-
eration multiplies the
menu to suit a variety
of tastes.

The DETROIT EDISON Company

.. ...

1

CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
ditrrsgrird.i. The names of communi.
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub.
lishel should not be construed as ex-
nrPesing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.

THE REPLY TO S. T.

I

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