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May 12, 1928 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-12

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JSTABLISHED
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ASSOCIATED
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TWELVE PAGES

VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 167.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1928.

TWELVE PACES

I I-

[D[[ocker Takes New
FRESHMEN BURN iiosition At Denison
POTS IN ANNUAL'
CAP NI6HT FIREP

TOSS SYMBOL OF SERVITUDE
INTO FLAMES AT SLEEPY
HOLLOW CEREMONY
'M' BLANKETS AWARDED
Judge Guy A. Miller, 'OOL, Recalls
Traditions of Former
University Life
While a crowd of several thousand
people looked on, the Freshmen
danced around a huge bonfire to toss
their pots into the flames as the
climax of the traditional Cap Night
ceremonies held last night in Sleepy
Hollow. The event began with parade
which formed on the campus in front
of the library {about 17:30 o'clock.
The Varsity band led the way to the
scene of the program on the hillside
east of the University Hospital.
"Through a great sacrifice on the
part of parents the University has
been built up to teach the supreme
values of the cardinal principles of
life-loyalty, sincerity, honesty and
knowledge," s'aid Judge Guy A. Miller,
'OL, of Detroit, base ball captain
in 1897.
Miller Recalls Traditions
Judge Miller recalled some of the
traditions of Michigan. He 'said the
Law class of 1900 introduced the era
of concrete sidewalks in Ann Arbor
by making a bonfire of the old wooden
ones. They also introduced the era
of open front lawns by introducing
the fences which surrounded them to
the same fate, and started the
"antedeluvian" street-cars on the
downward path when they made a
bonfire of the ties which supportedl
the State street car track. He also
recalled memories of the days when
Miss Evangeline E. Land, Lindy's
mother was a student at the Univer-
sity.
"The only other end who ever play-
ed on a Michigan football team who
should be compare-t -Benny Ooster-
baan is Neil Snow who played end
for four years and had won 12 letters
when he graduated," Judge Miller said
in commenting on the presentation
of the M. blankets.
Speaking for the -students, Jo H.
Chamberlin, '28, told of the meaning
of cap night to the various classes
and to the faculty. In talking of
Mortimer E. Cooley, Dean of the Col-
leges of Engineering and Architec-
ture, who was unable to speak last
night because of illness, Chamberlin
said that respect was dne Dean
Cooley as a "helper to build men and
women of ability and understanding.
We must pay our repects to Dean
Cooley as a gentleman and a
scholar."
Smith Introduces Speakers
Before introducing to speakers,
Courtland C. Smith '28, president of
the Student Council told of the tradi-
tions of Cap Night and the history of
the event. He then introduced Coach
Elton E. Wieman who presented the
"M" blankets.
In order to win an "M" blanket a
man must have won two letters in one
sport and must be, a candidate for
a degree. The presentation of the
blankets at Cap Night ceremonies is
the only official public recognition
shown Varsity athletes by the Uni-
versity.
During the presentation a large
burning "M" flamed on the hill-side
before the crowd.
During the program, several selec-
tions were played by the Varsity band
and cheers were led by Charles Cor-
rell, '30, a Varsity cheer leader. Fol-
lowing the ceremonies at "Sleepy
Hollow" a moving picture show wa
givenat Hill Auditorium which in-
cluded a feature picture and a comedy
furnished by Butterfield Theaters
Inc.
Arrangements for the ceremon
were made by a Student Counci
committee headed by John E. Starrett
'28E. The committee was greatly aid
ed in completing the plans by Buter
field Theaters, the Buildings an
tGrounds department and the studen
body as a whole.

PLAN TO INSPECT
LOCAL LIBRARIES
Six distinguished Mexican librar
ians will be in Ann Arbor Monday
May 21, to inspect libraries of thi
city. These men are part of a grou
appointed by the Minister of Educa
tion of Mexico to attend the fiftiet
annual conference of the America
Library association, which will be hel

Lionel Crocker, '18 '
IOf the speech department, who will
leave the University next year to be-
come the head of the speech depart-
ment at Denison university. Mr.
Crocker has been a member of the
Ifaculty since 1920, although he has
been on leave of absence twice dur-
ing this period. In 1921-1922 he taught
at Waseda unicersity. Tokyo, Japan
and in 1926-1927 taught speech on the
I University Afloat.
ALUMNI !UNIVERSITY IS
ENDORSED AT REUION
Michigan, Wisconsin, Missouri Heads
Address Final Event Of Two
Day Triennial
SUBMIT DORMITORY PLANS
(Special to The Daily)
CHICAGO, May 11.-Alumni of the
University of Michigan cheered wild-
ly at announcements made tonight
at the second triennial banquet con-
cerning the, inaugural of the ten year
alumni program for the satisfacton
of University needs:
Nathan Potter, govdrnor of the
University of Michigan club of Ann
Arbor announced that the Ann Arbor
society was sponsoring a campaign
for the erection of the Burton Mem-
orial Campanile on the campus. This
campanile will permit the housing of
a carillon for which a campaign a-
mong the students has already been
1 started. Ann Arbor alumni will be
backed in this campaign by the city
and its civic organizations and by
alun.'ni organizations and alumni
throughout the United States.
; Following this momentous announ-
' president of the Detroit aluni so-
ciety, announced that the Detroit al-
l umni had already raised a sum of
'$25,000 towards financing of dormI-
tories. This sum is the first achieve-
ment in the program of alumni for
giving dormitories to Michigan. 'Such
a program has been approved in prin-
ciple by the Board of Regents and
has been made the principle objec-
tive of jlumni by action of the tri-
ennial reunion.
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, May 11-Alumni of the
University of Michigan at the trien-
nial conference today endorsed plans
_ for an "alumni university" proposed
by President Clarence Cook Little.
Four hundred delegates also voiced
their confidence in the president's
policy.
"We renew our faith and confidence
in President Clarence Cook Little and
_pledge to him abiding loyalty and con-
tinuing support," reads th'e resolution
adopted by graduates.
Reassured by this support, President
Little last night enlarged upon his
plan to provide education for alumni.
He spoke at the triennial banquet.
"The great fault with universities,'
Y said Dr. Little, "is they can't see the
1 forest because of the trees."
"We are too prone to let minor
' problems becloud main issues," li
said. "There are decidedly more im-
portant things than conjugation o
t French verbs and the solution of prob
lems in calculus. We must remembei
that the factors of greatest momen
are the relations of the alumni to th
university and the relation of both o:
S these to the state.
"The 'alumni university' will be
created with the idea of creating a
more active and intelligent interes
on the part of the graduate. It wil
s l begin with the student in his under
p graduate days by preparing him to re
- ceive assistance which the universit
h will be able to give to greater ad-
p' vantage when his mind has matured.'
d Fielding H. Yost, Michigan's fam

SENATORS HONOR
LATECOLLEAGUE~
LAT H__E
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 11.-The life
story of the late Frank B. Willis of
Ohio was recounted by his Senate col-
league today when that body laid
aside its duties to pay homage to the
memory of a member stricken by
death on the eve of his greatest po-
litical adventure.
The special services required that
the word-battered but otherwise un-
scathed Republican tax reduction
plan be laid aside until tomorrow. Up
to date it had successfully repelled
Democratic raids in every engage-
ment and it looked today as if the
Democrats themselves were a little
tired of trying. At least they talked
of many other things than taxes
most of the time the bill was up for
consideration.
On the House side, the emergency
officers' retirement bill after violent
but seemingly increasingly limited
opposition was pushed toward theI
final vote. Even its most ardent op-
ponents admitted toward the last it
was a hopeless fight.
RHETOR STKFF WILL
LOSE FIVE MEMBERS
Johnson, Gate Xreder, Bonwsma anal
Vander Lugt Leave Next Fall
For New Positions
WILL NAME INSTRUCTORS
Five instructors of the Retoric
faculty, all of whom have applied for
doctor of philosophy degrees, will
leave the University of Michigan next
fall to teach in other schools, Prof.
P. M. Jack, head of the departi:ent,
announced yesterday.
O. C. Johnson will go to Long Is-
land university, New York city,
where he will be assistant professor
of English; Theodore J. Gates wxt
return to Penn State; Paul V. Kreid-
er will become an instructor in the
English department of the Univers-
ity' of Cincinnati;. 0. T. Vander Lugt
Ihas accepted a position as professor
of philosophy in Carroll college, Wau-
kesha, Wis.,; and O. K. Bouwsma will
become instructor in philosophy at
the University of Nebraska.
Dr. William O. Raymond, who is as-
sistant professor of English here,
has accepted the chair of English at
Bisltop's college, Lennoxville, Que.,
and will assume his new duties next
fall, it was also stated.
Successors to these men have been
tentatively named by the heads o
the English and Rhetoric depart-
ments, but they will not be announc-
ed until after the next meeting of
the Board of Regents.
Mr. Johnson has been instructor
in Rhetoric here since 1920, receiving
a master's degree in 1921. This sum-
mer he will travel with the Open
Road Tour before taking his new po-
sition in New Yor. Mr. Gates taught
Rhetoric here two years, previously
holding a position at Penn State
Mr. Kreider has taught here three
years, being engaged in public school
work in Ohio before that time. H
received a bachelor's degree from Ob-
erlin college and a master's degree
at Michigan. Four years as Rhetoric
instructor here will be terminated by
Mr. Vander Lugt when he goes tc
Carroll college. Mr. Bouwsma has
taught in the Rhetoric department
1 for six years, securing a master's
'degree in 1921.
The Weather

(By Associated Press)
Fair today and probably tomorrow;
not quite so cool today with rising
temperature tomorrow.

TRY-OUTS FOR CHORUSES TO
HELD MONDAY AT
MEETING

BE

ADOPT NEWMUSIC POLICY
Meeting Of Those Who Registered For
Committee Positions Will Be Held
This Afternoon At Mimes
With the arrival tomorrow of Roy
Hoyer, heading man with Fred Stone,
the meeting today of all applicants
for committee positions, and the first
gathering on Monday of all those try
ing out for places in the chorus, work
for the 1928 Michigan Union Opera
will begin at once, according to .Dalton
D. Walper, '29, general chairman of
this year's production.
Hoyer, who has added many dis-
tinctivercontributionsdto past Operas.
and has assisted in their production
for the last 12 years with the ex-
ception of last year, will personally
supervise the siring praictice and en-
deavor to acquaint the tryouts for the
choruses with certain steps to be in-
corporated into the new show .
Hold Meeting Monday
The first meeting of all those Who
have registered for the choruses and
any who were unable to leave their
names with these in charge of the
registration last week will be held in
Mimes theater at 7:30 o'clock, Monday
night, when matters of considerable
importance in connection with the
Opera will be discussed with themn, ac-
cording to E. Mortimer Shuter, gen-
eral director of the entire production.
This afternoon at 1:30 all those who
have registered for committee posi-
tions on the new staff under Walper
will meet in Mimes theater for their
initial gathering. All such applicants
are asked to be present so that cer-
tain plans can be formulated.
Since a new policy has been adopted
regarding the selection of music for
the coming presentation, the idea of
choosing the music from efforts of all
those who care to write the music
rathr'fhan have just one r tw oper-
sons compose all the scores, everyone
who intends to do some work in this
direction shoulti communicate with
Walper as a meeting of the group will
be held in the near future so that in-
structions and general ideas may be
given by those in charge.
Policy Is Changed
Another change in the policy is plan-
ned in connection with the choruses,
as a special attempt will be made to
obtain men from the glee club as well
as others with good voices in addition
to a number whose specialty is danc-
ing so that there will be exceptional
musical talent in the coming pro-
duction in accordance with the aim
of Mr. Shuter that the music shall
be an outstanding feature.
Theodore Harrison, of the School
of Music, and director of the glee club,
will personally' direct the singing and
all musical work having to do with
the show for the coming year, while
Donal Hamilton Baines of the jour-
nalism department is consulting daily
with anyone interested in writing the
book for the Opera.
CORRECT ERRORS
'IN WEEKLY STAFF
Owing to a typographical error, as-
sociate editors of The Michigan Week-
ly for next year were incorrectly list-
ed in yesterday morning's Daly.
Following are the associate editors
of that publication for next rear.
Howard Simon, '30, George E. Sim-
ons, '30, Charles S. Monroe, '30, Ed-
win F. Forbes, '29, John H. Maloney
'29, Lawrence R. Klein, '30, and Jos-
eph E. Howell, '30.
Other appointments for The Week
ly as anounced yesterday were cor-
rect with the exception that Bertram
Askwith, '31, has been added to th
staff.

WORK FOR 1928 UNION
OPERA TO BEGIN WITH
HOYER'S VISIT SUNDAY

MODEL ASSEMBLY
TO HOLD MEETING
(By Associated Press)
LANSING, May 11-Collegiate Mich-
igan will form itself into a model
League of Nations assembly here Sat-
urday, the first replica of the Geneva
conclave to be held in this state.
Nearly 200 delegates from 14 col-
leges and universities of the state will
gather in the house of representatives
in the morning when George W. Wick-
ersham will assume the active presi-
dency of the assembly until William
C. Dixon, '28L, at the University of
Michigan, is elected.
ALBERSON TO DELIVER~
ADDRESS AT BANQUET
Sixth Annual Father And Son Dinner
To Be Held Tonight At Union
Climaxing Week End
fICKETS CONTINUE ON SALE
R. B. Alberson, 'OOL, of Des Moines,
Iowa, will deliver the principal ad-
dress tonight at the sixth annual
Father and Son banquet being spon-
sored by, the Union. The banquet
which begins at 5:30 in the Union
ballroom will mark the climax of an
entire week end of entertainment
which has been provided by the Union
for visiting fathers.
Tickets for the affair will continue
on sale until noon today with those
interested urged to make reservations
at the erliest possible moment. The
ticket price is $1.50 and includes not
only the dinner which is to be in-
formal but admittance to both the dual
track meet between Minnesota and
Michigan and the conference tennis
meet between the Wolverines and Il-
linois.
A student of the literary college in
1897, Mr. Alberson graduated from the
Law school in 1900. Before coming
to Michigan, h was a member of the
Princeton student body. He has been
secured as the speaker tonight large-
ly through the efforts of his son, John
W. Alberson, '3OL.
The other speakers on the banquet
program are William D. Henderson,
director of the extension division of
the University, who will be the fac-
ulty speaker, and William V. Jeffries,
grad., the student speaker.
JAPAN CONCENTRATES
TROOPS IN SHANTUNO
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, May 11.-While the Jap-
anese were concentrating their posi-
tion in Tsinan, capital of the province
of Shantung, today, further prepar-
ations were being made in Tokio to
send reinforcements to the war-torn
province.
Simultaneously the intervention of
Ithe Japanese in Shantung has been
put to the League of Nations at Gen-
eva. The Nanking (Southern) govern-
ment entered a protest with the Lea-
gue against what it charges is th
Japanese violation of Chinese ter-
ritory and independence. For the mo-
power to act unless the Peking gov-
einment, or another governtent
member of the league, associates it
self with Nanking in seeking an in
vestigation.
Geneva dispatches indicate the pos
sibility of direct negotiation between
China and Japan, instead of actio
by the League.
Orders have been issued to the Yap
anese railway authorities to prepar
for the transportation of 20,000 me
, and more than 5000 horses to Shan

- tong between next Sunday and rr
end of the month. This will brini
the total Japanese troops in Shan
tung to about 28,000 men.
Tokio advices place the number o:
e Japanese dead in the recent fightin
at 34, 21 of them soldiers. Sevent
soldiers were wounded and nine ci
vilians, while 28 civilians are missing
P Advices from Shanghai reporte
the death of Mrs. William T. Hobart
68 years old, of the American Metho
o dist mission at Paianfu, near Tsnan
e on April 20. Mrs. Hobart, whose hus
s band is at Tainfu, was killed by
d bullet fired through a small windor
e in her bedroom during fighting be
- tween the Nationalists and the Nor
- therners.

MINNESOTA STARS COUNTED ON
FOR WINS IN THEIR
SPECIALTIES.
PROGRAM BEGINS AT 2:30
Buck Hester Favored To Win Dashes;
Cooper Slated For Victory In
High and Low Hurdles
By MORRIS QUINN
Another page will be added to the
annals of Michigan dual meet history
this afternoon when Coach Sherman
Finger's Minnesota track team in-
vades Ferry field for the single home
engagement on the Wolverine out-
door schedule. The first event on the
program, the 100 yard dash, is sched-
uled to take place at 2:30 o'clock.
While the Gophers are not expect-
ed to press the team that whipped
the supposedly strong Buckeye outfit
a week ago at Columbus by a twenty
point margin, their individual stars
are certain to score heavily in their
Specialties.

A survey of the meets in which the
Northmen have engaged thus far,
fails to reveal even a semblance of
team balance.. In the Ohio Relays
the Gophers collected a few points,
and placed in four .events in the
Drake Relays a week later. Compet-
ing in a triangular meet last Friday
with Iowa and Wisconsin, they finish-
ed a poor third.
Otterness To Compete
The invaders will depend on the
pole vault for a number of their
points as Otterness, Hess, and Crow-
ey are all consistant at 12 feet 6
:nches or better. Otterness did 13
feet 1 inch in the Ohio meet and Hess
cleared 12 feet 10 inches to win at
Drake.
Captain Buch Hester is favored to
:ake both dashes, although the Min-
aesota team boasts a capable sprinter
in Rhea, who has turned the 100 in
better than 10. Chapman can be re-
led on to press both of these men,
f Coach Farrell decides to use him
n the sprints.
Chances of another Wolverine 'slam
n the 440 seem out of the question
Nith Catlin entered for the Gophers.
le is credited with a victory over
owa's Olympic candidate, George
Laird, in Friday's meet. Lomont and
Yionroe have bettered the perform-
inces of any of the Minnesota half
milers.
With Captain Laemmle slated to
2ompete in the discus, the invaders
are practically certain of another
first place, as he has tossed the plat-
:er over 135 feet on several occasions.
rhere appears to be little to choose
oetween the shot putters of the two
teams, as neither boasts a consistent
10 footer. .
Michigan Favored
On a basis of their showings in the
Ohio meet the Maize and Blue athletes
should capture the majority of the
Joints in both the mile and the two
nile runs, as the invaders are notice-
ably weak in both events. Similiarly,
he Wolverine broad jumpers, Chap-
man and Arendt, are favored to finish
one, two, the Gopher's placing only
;hird last week when a jump of
slightly over 21 feet was good for
first.
MacKinnon, Minnesota javelin
thrower, appears a likely winner due
o the fact that he has been tossing
the reed around the 175 foot marki
with greater regularity than any of
the Michigan athletes. Ooternes
[less, apd Rhea are slated to par-
ticipate in the high jump witl
Felker, Waldo, and Lane entered fo
the Wolverines.
While Don Cooper is expected tc
annex both the high and the lo
hurdles without a great deal of diffi
culty, Otterness has ran the high
in :15 and may give him trouble
Kinney, Cooper's teammate, must als
be reckoned with in the shorter event
The hammer throw appears to be
Michigan's best chance for a slam, a
Ketz, Williams, and McArthur are al
considered better than the trio o
Minnesota weightmen.
CHICAGO GREETS
BREMEN AIRMEP
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, May 11.-On the eve o
its formal reception for the transat
lantic fiers, Chicago manifested i
1 spirit of "I Will" in atempting t

f

M,
VII

ARFEE PITCHES TEAM TO 6-1
3TORY, OVER IOWA; TRACKMIN
EET MINNESOTA HERE TODAY

WOLVERINES WIN SIXTH GAME
AND HAND HAWKEYES
SECOND DEFEAT
HURLER HITS HOME RUN
Triple By Nebelung With Men On Base
And Two Out Starts Varsity
On Three Run Rally
BIG TEN STANDINGS }
W. L. Pet. }
IMichigan......... 6 0 1.0001
Iowa............5 2 .714
Illinois ...........4 2 .666 I
Indiana ...........4 2 .666
Purdue ...........4 4 .500
Chicago......:...2 2 .600
Wisconsin......... 2 3. .400
Ohio State ......1 3 .250
Minnesota. .....0 3 .000
Northwestern ... 0 7 .000 I
(Special to The Daily)
IOWA CITY, May 11-Michigan re-
tained her lead in the Big Ten baser
ball race by defeating Iowa here to-
day, 6-1, for her sixth consecutive
victory of the season and McAfee reg-
istered his fourth Big Ten win at the
expense of the Hawkeye team.
The Wolverines continued their ha-
bit of allowing their opponents a sin-
gle run. McAfee and Twogood engag-
ed. in a real pitching duel for eight
innings, only to have the Fisher-
coached team come to life in the final
inning with a three run rally.
The big Wolverine sophomore had
a shade the better of "Lefty" Two-
good, who was on the mound for the
Hawks. . The Iowa twirler granted
eight hits and whiffed 13, but his wild-
ness proved detrimental, seven Mich-
igan batters reaching first base on
walks. McAfee allowed 10 hits, but
tightened up with men on bases and
effectively checked the Hawkeye ral-
lies.
Poor base running, however, was as
much the cause for the Iowans' de-
feat as their inability to hit in the
pinches, several possible runs being
cut off because of this weakness.
Captain Loos, Nebelung, and McCoy
were the big guns for the invading
team, while Thompson, who led the
Big Ten hitters last season, collected
a brace of doubles. Captain Terry gar-
nered a triple and two singles in five
times at bat.
McAfee started his team one its way
to victory in the third frame by scor-
ing the fir~t run of the contest, when
he clouted the ball over the fence
for a homer.
The Wolverines added two more to
their total in the fifth on two singles,
a double steal by Nebelung and Mc-
Coy and Oosterbaan's two bagger. The
" Hawks knotted the count in this
frame, however, scoring the single run
gleaned off McAfee's delivery.
With two men retired in the ninth,
the Michigan team went on a ramp-
age that netted three more counters
and put the game on ice. Two walks,
Nebelung's. triple, and McCoy's single
sending three runs across the plate.
..BOX SCORE

Michigan
Loos, ss
Nebelung,cf
McCoy, If
Corriden, 2b
Oosterbaan, 'lb
Weintraub, 3b
Reichinan, c
Slagel, rf
McAfee, p
Totals.

AB
5
5
4
4
3
3
4
2
3
3

R
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
6

R
2
2
.
0
1.
0
0
0
1
8

po
0
0 '
4
1
10
1
6
2
3
27

A
2
0
0
2
0
1
- 0
1

r
J
i

ROBERT MORSS LOVET T DISCUSSES
"TOLSTOY, ARTIST IN HUMAN LIFE'

"Tolstoy was not and is not a lonely
voice crying in the wilderness, but one
of many voices of his age." said Prof.
Robert Morss Lovett, head of the Eng-
lish department at the University of
Chicago, speaking yesterday afternoon
on "Tolstoy, Artist in Human Life."
"His message," continued Professor
Lovett, "is in harmony with that of
the other contemporary prophets such
as Ruskin, Arnold, Elliot, and Morris
who were all striving toward the same
ideals."
Professor Lovett went on to say that
Tolstoy, although he did not live in an
industrial world which would foster

general well-being and progress.
"Tolstoy was absolutely opposed t
intellectualism and realized, that the
greatest tragedy of modern times i.
class distinction. He was convincee
that this had to be overcome before
any satisfaction and fundamental mea
sures could be taken," added Profes
s.,, r --++L

Iowa AB R HPO A
Terry, cf 5 0 3 2 0
Blackford, 2b 4 0 0 1 0
Glassgow, ss 5 0 1 1 4
Rath, If 5 0 -1 1 0
Thompson, c 5 0 2 13 2
Nelson, 3b 3 0 0 0 1
S'ahs, lb 3 1 1 6,0
Heintel, cf 3 0 0 2 0
Gamble, mf 1 0 0 0 0
Twogood, p 4 0 2 1 0
totals 38 1 10 27 7
Home run-McAfee. Three-base hits
-Nebelung. Two-base hits-Thomp-
son 2, Terry, Glasskow, Oosterbaan.
Stolen bases - Nebelung, McCoy.
Struck out-By Twogood 13, By Mc-
Afee 5. Base on balls-Twogood 7,
McAfee 2. Errors (Iowa) Blackford,
Rath, (2); (Michigan) Loos, Corri-
den 2, (3). Hit by pitcher-McAfee
(Sahs). Umpires-Naperstek and
Campbell,
HOWE SPEAKS TO SOCIETY

1

sor Lovett.
He concluded by saying that Tolstoy FELLOWSHIPS ARE
believed that "the kingdom of heavenR
is in you" and that the universal GIVEN GRADUA TES
brotherhood of man is the only true
religious conception. Tolstoy's ideal Carl 0. Erlanson, and Roy W. Swan-
was to arrive at a general healthy son, University graduates, were
state of society. awarded two of the five honorary fel-

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