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May 10, 1928 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-10

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ESTABLISHED
1890

IC (

Abr
Alupp- t r

VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 165. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1928.

ElIGHT PAGE:

ER

is

ELECTED

TO

NISSEN

IS

OVER WHELMING

ORATORICAL PRESIDENCYl IS WON
BY GSSdNERH IN DECISIVE BATTLE;'
WALKLEY AND LYONS ARE CHOSEN
MERRY, PUSCH AND AHN TAKE
PLACES ON BOARD OF
PUBLICATIONS

Burying his opposition under an unprecedented avalanche of votes,a
William Nissen, '29. was chosen yesterday as president of the Union forS
next year, at the annual all-campus spring elections. The successfula
candidate has been connected with Union activities for more than two p
years. His opponent was C. Ford Schott, '29. The final count wasb
1,782 votes for Nissen as compared with 415 for Schott, a majoritys
of more than four votes to one.
Running also with a tremendous majqrity, although in a contest
which attracted less interest, Kenneth Schafer, '29, snowed under William
Sp>encer, '291, for the position of recording secretary. The vote was
Schafer, 1204; Spencer, 6, for the second position on the Union
ticket.
The vice-presidents elected from
the various classes were with only twor
exceptions elected by substantial ma-
jorities.' A real contest developed in
the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts where Ralph Popp, '29, nosed
out his two rivals, Charles Whyte, '29, WITH RUSSELL PRIZE
and Richard Helms, '29, by narrow
margins. ' The final vote was Popp Medal Awarded To Young Faculty
363, Whyte 304, and Helmp '260. Man Who Shows Brilliance
In the Colleges of Engineering and And Promise
Architecture John Hall, '29, won hand-
ily from Marshall Rouse, '29, after SAN
Thomas Yates, '29, withdrew on the DERS fGIVES LECTURE
eve of the election. Hall polled 250
votes t o 111 for Rouse. Similarly Prof. henry A. Sanders, of the- Lat-c
in the Law school the contest de- in department, delivered the Henry
veloped little competition when David Russell lectire for 1928 yesterday at-
Vokes, '29L, defeated Alfred Bowman, ternoon in Natural Science auditor-
'29L, by 145 ballots to 61. iunm, and Prof. Lawrence M. Gould
In the Medical school Bernard Wat- of the geology department was an-
son. '29M, defeated Robert Burhans, nounced by President Clarence Cook
'29M, by a vote of 177 to 108 for the Little as the recipient of the Henry
office of medical vice-president of the Russell award.
Union, and the second close contest As winner of the award, Professor.
of the day developed for the position Gould will receive his Russell med-a
of combined vice-presidein when Her- al and an honorarium which is annual-,
bert Hunter, '29 B.Ad., defeated his ly given, in the words of President.
two o ),ponents, Roland Dahl, '30P, and Little, "to a young member of the
Henry W. Balgooyen, '29B.Ad., by a faculty who, in the opinion of the
margin of only three votes over his committee, shows promise and bril-
closest competitor. The final count liance, and who has begun to make
was Hunter 31, Balgooyen 28, and, his mark in the field of scholastic
Dahl 12. endeavor." The committee on the a-
The dental college returned another ward consisted of Prof. Edwin D. Dick
decisive vote for the position of dental inson,, Prof. Henry C. Ande:rson, Dr.
vice-president when William Hayllor, Alfred S. Warthin, Prof. James H.
'29D, deefated Judson Heess, '30D, and Hanford, and Prof. John G. Winter.
J. Mortimer Fisher, '30D. The final Professor Gould is a graduate of
vote was Hayllor 81, Heess 39, and the University, and he received his
Fisher 5. Ph.D. here in geology. He was sec-
In the contest for places on the ond in command of the University
Board in Control of Student Publica- Greenland expedition in 1926, and last
tions Ellis Merry, '28, with 1107 votes, summer was director of the geolog-
and William Pusch, '28. with 1079 vot- ical and geographical work of the Put.;
es, easily distanced all other candi- nam Baffin Bay expedition. He has
dates, while George Ahn, '29, won a been chosen by 'Commander Richard
close race from the remainder of E. Byrd as geologist and geographer
the field for the third member of the on the Byrd Antarctic expedition to
board with 688 votes. Howard Ken- leave next Septem'ber.
yon, '29, was in fourth place with 667 Professor Sanders, '90, became a
votes. member of the University faculty in
Robert Gessner. '29, won easily the 1893. He is the author of a number
contest for president of the Oratorical of books and articles on Old Testa-
association from 'his opponent, Lyle ment and New Testament manuscriptwP
Eiserman, '30L, with a poll of 1399 to and in 1915-16 he was acting director
656. Lawrence Walkley, '30, won a of the School of Classical Studies at
similar easy victory in the contest for the American Academy in Rome. Next
vice-president of the board with a year he leaves for Rome to accept a
vote of 1035 to 786 for fIarold Char- permanent position as director of the
ter, '30L, his opponent, and Lawrence same school.
Hartwig, '31, defeated two opponents, Speaking on the topic, "New Testa-
Jarl Andeer, '29, and John Webster, (Continued on Page Two)
'30P, for treasurer of the same organ-
ization. Dorothy Lyons '29, defeatedW
Margaret Arthur, '29, for the positionoTherWeathert
of secretary of this board by a vote
of 1090 to 759. Unsettled with showers and possibly
afthunderstorms today; slightly warm-
A- A -mom a A sm a . ., .....F7. n n..t . 4an nn lar i m r

PLANS ORGANIZED
FOR FATHERS.DAY
Tickets for the sixth annual Father1
and Son banquet being sponsored byI
the Union on Saturday night will con-
tinue on sale until Saturday noon,
William E. Nissen, chairman of the af-
fair announced last night.
With plans complete for a week-
end activity for visiting fathers andI
with the banquet speakers already
c'hosen, but little remains to be ac-
complished before the actual begin-
ning of festivities Friday, when many
of the visitors will attend the Cap
Night ceremonies.
An interscholastic track meet willA
attract the interest of the fathers on
Saturday morning and Varsity track
and tennis meet' will serve a similar
purpose in the afternoon. R. B. Al-
bertson, '00L, of Des Moines, Iowa, e:
will address the banquet which is i
scheduled to being at 5:30 o'clock in t
the Union ballroom.
C
AOUNCE SCHEDULES ib
FOR ENGINE SCHOOL2
'h
First Lecture Or First Quiz SectionA
Of Week Will Decide T110ie
Of Examinationo
ARCHITECTSADOPT PLAN
Announcement of the June final ex-h
amination schedule for the College of
Engineering and Architecture wa's
made yesterday by the classification?
committee of the Engineering school.I
The examinations will begin June 2
and will continue through June 12.
Drawing and laboratory work may1
be continued through the examina-f
tion period in amount equal to thatt
normally devoted to such work duriig
one wee.
All cases of conflict between as-I
signed examination periods should bel
reported to Professor J. C. Brier, room1
3223 East Engineering building.
The complete examination 'schedule
is as follows:
Monday at 8 o'clock classes will be1
examined on Wednesday morning,
June 6; Monday at 9 o'clock classes
will be examined Monday morning,
June 4; for Monday at 11 o'clock
classes, the examination will be Sat-
urday morning, June 2.,Monday at 1
o'clock classe will be examined on
Thursday afternoon, June 7, Monday
2 o'clock classes will be examined
Tuesday morning, June 12, and 3
o'clock classes will be examined on,
amined Saturday afternoon, June 9.
Tuesday at 8 o'clock classes are to
be examined on Saturday morning,
June 9; Tuesday at 9 o'clock classes
will be examined on Monday afternoon,
June 11; 10 o'clock classes on Tues-!
day will be examined Tuesday morn-
ing, June 5, and Tuesday 11 o'clock
classes will be examined Tuesday
afternoon, June 5.
Tuesday classes at 1 o'clock will be
examined Monday morning, June 11;
2 o'clock classes on Tuesday are to be
examined on Friday afternoon, June
8; and Tuesday 3 o'clock classes will
be examined Tuesday afternoon, June
12.
E.M. 1 and 2; C.E. 2; Draw. 2 will
be examined Monday afternoon, June
4. Surveying 2, 4 are to be examin-
ed Wednesday afternoon, June 6.
M.E. 3 will be examined Saturday
afternoon, June 2. Shop 2, 3, 4, are to
be examined Thursday morning, June
7, and E.E. 2a will be examined Sat-
urday afternoon June 9.
All morning examination periods are
from 8 to 12 o'clock; afternoon exam-
ination periods are from 2 to 6
o'clock.

HOBBS PARTY LEAVES
TODAY ON EXCURSION
TO NORTHERN STATION
WILL SAIl1 ABOARD COLVWIUS
AT M[)'NIGHT TOMORROW
ENIROUTE TO GOALI
CARLSON ALREADY THERE
Belknap, Also of University Geology
Department, Will Blake Trip
As Assistant To Hobbs
Prof. William H. Hobbs of the ge-
ology department, director of the Un-
versity Greenland expeditions, leaves
oday for the Mt. Evans weather ob-
servatory via New York, Br/men,
Copenhagen, and Holstensborg, thi
Greenland port of call for Mt. Evans.
He will sail at midnight tomorrow a-
board the Columbus of the North Ger-
man Lloyd line for Bremen, Germany.
With the exception of William S.
Carlson, who is already at Mt. Evans,{
having arrived about the midde o
April, the rest of this year's party
consisting of Ralphi L. B~elknap, sec-
ond in command, L. R. S'chneider, aer.
ologist, Duncan Stewart, assistant
geodosist and geologist to Belknap.
andl Francis M. Baer, radio expert'
will sail fron New York for Copen-
htagen, May 19.
Three To Return Soon
Hobbs, Belknap, and Stewart will
return to civilization late in the sum-
mer', leaving Schneider, Carlson, and
Baer to spend the winter together
atop Mt. Evans taking meteorological
observations from the station built
last year. Data on the winds that
form the glacial anticyclone around
the ice-cap will be collected by the
party with the aid of balloons.
The Greenland storms are being
studied to determine what effect they
have on the weaker over the travel-
led lanes of the North Atlantic. Dur-
ing the past year there have been at
least six clear-cut cases in which
violent'storms have been recorded by
the Mt. Evans station two days before
they have swept southward wih ter-
rific force over the middle Atlantic
and the Newfoundland banks.
To Make Island Trek
Belknap and Stewart will make a
trek inland to the edge of the ice-cap
and map it, working southward about
200 miles until it swings around to
the coast. There are no adequate
maps in existence for this area of
Greenland, according to Belknap.
They will then proceed along the
coast and up the Soendra Stroemfjord
to Mt. Evans. If sufficient time re-
mains they will also map the edge of
the ice-cap from the head of Ikertok
fjord where the first Greenland ex-
pedition camped to the head of Kan-
gendlugsdak fjord, or Soendra Stro-
cmfjord, as in Danish.
(Continued On Page Three.)

TEN ELIMINATED
IN SPEECH TRIAL
Charles H. Atwell, '28, Chester Ben-
nett, '29, Watson Clay, '30, Ormand J.
Drake, Spec. Ed. and Lawrence Hart-
wig, '31, with Fred M. Mock '28, as al-
ternate were selected as the finalists
in the Thomas E. H. Black oratorical
cogtept following' pioliminary con-
tests which were concluded yester-
day.
The five speakers were chosen from
a group of 15 competitors by Prof.
Richard D. T. Hollister of the speech
department aided by Lyle Eiserman,
'30L, Robert J. Gessner, '29, winner
of the contest last year, and Robert
0. Miller, '29L, president of the Ora-
torical association for the past year.
Each one of the finalists is requested
to get in touch with Professor Hollis-
ter as soon as possible for additignal
coaching before the final contest.
This contest will be held as planned
at 7:30 o'clock,tSunday night, May 20
in the First Methodist church. An
award of $100 in cash and a gold
medal will be made to the orator
placing first in the final competiton.
A prize of $50, it is announced, will
be presented to the speaker taking
second.
According to Professor Hollister,
the preliminary speeches were excep-
tionally fine and promise one of the
best campus oratorical contests in
years.

STDENT (COUNCIL

INDIANA SUPPORTS
WATSON MACHINE
INDIANAPOLIS, May 9-U. S. Sen.
James E. Watson's nomination in In-
diana over Herbert Hoover for the
presidency virtually assured on the
Republican ticket, interest in the pri-
maries tonight switched to guberna-
torial affairs which confronted both
major political parties.
The United States senatorial nom-
ination had been determined quickly
with Sen. Arthur R. Robinson defeat-
ing two other Republican candidates
easily, while Albert Stump, of Indian-
apolis, scored as an impressive a vie-
tdry over opponents on the Demo-
cratic side.
NIGHT 1SPEAKER;
I HILL AUDITORIUM j

TO HOUS Y PARTY
Appi oximately 250 couples will
damte to the music of Howard Bunts
and his colored orchestra from De-
troit, when the 17th Annual Archi-
tects' May Party comes into being
tomorrow night at Barbour Gymna-
sium. There are a few tickets remain-
ing for sale in the Senior drafting
room in the Architectural building,

er; partly cioayUy a 7ULtm
row,

JUDGE GUY MILLER TO BE ALUMNI CAPI
FREE PICTURE SHOW WILL BE GIVEN IN

d

Judge Guy A. Miller, '00L, was an- the campus to form a procession
which will march to Sleepy Hollow
nounced last night as speaker for led by the Varsity band. Seniors in
the alumni at the Cap bight cere- caps and gowns will meet on the
mnony to be held at 7:30 Friday night walk between Barbour gyrnnasium
in Sleepy Hollow, and Dean Mortimer and the Chemistry building, and jun-
E. Cooley was announced as tentative .iors will assemble on the campus
faculty speaker on the program. side of the old Medical building. So-
It has been impossible to ascertain phomores will assemble between the
definitely whether Dean Cooley will Chemnistry and Natural Science build-
be abe to speak, but since he was ings, and freshmen in front of the

will be posted.
Courtland C. Smith, '28, president
of the Student council will be master
of ceremonies. Judge Miller, captain
of the baseball team in 1897, Dean
will speak, and Coach Tad E. Wie-
Cooley, and Jo. H. Chamberlain, re-
tiring managing editor of The D:jly
man will present M-blankets to those
seniors who have one, two or uvore
letters.

I

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