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May 08, 1928 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-08

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9STABLISHED
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VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 163. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 1928.

MIGHT R

GRADUATING STUDENTS!
WILL DON GOWNS FOR
SWlNGOUT _EXERCISES
ANNUAL MARCH TO BP FOLLOWED
BY ASSEMBLY AT HILL
AUDITORIUM
DEAN BATES WILL SPEAK
Procession Will March North Across
Campus To North University
And Then To Meeting
Appearing in the formal attire of
graduation-black flowing robes and
tasseled caps-for the first time, the
graduating students, totaling nearly
1700, from the various schools and
colleges of the University will at 3:30t
this afternoon assemble at the center
of the campus and march in an aca-
demic procession to Hill auditorium,
where exercises marking the opening
of the graduating activities, will be
held. -
In this ceremony, the annual swing-I
out of the graduates, the class of 1928
will be making their first official
showing as a complete unit. Marching,
with the Varsity band and the student
leaders In the- front, the seniors, in
double column, will parade down the
diagonal to the auditorium, and fol-
lowing the exercises, will circum-
scribe the 'campus.
Student Life Is Topic
At the auditorium, the address of
the occasion will be delivered by Dean
Henry Bates, of the Law school. His I
reflections on student life, while Dean
Bates has been at the University will
furnish the subject matter for this
speech. The Reverend Henry Lewis
will give the invocation at the ser-
vices.
Led by the Varsity band, immediate-
ly followed by Robert Leland, '28,
president of the senior class, and
Courtland C. Smith, '28, president of
the Student council, the seniors. will
march, after mobilizing in front of
the main Library, north on the diagon-
al to North University avenue, then
east to Hill auditorium, Entrance
there- will be made through the west
side doors. Seniors entering first
willll the rear seats first, and those
entering last the front seats, accord-
1ng to John T. Snodgrass, chairman of
the committee which has made ar-
rangements for the swing-out cere-
mony.
Picture To Be Taken 1
On leaving the auditorium, the stu-
dents in the rear will exit first, form-
Ing In the same order as on entering, t
according to the chairman. The pro-
cession will then march east on North
University avenue, to Barbour gym-
nasiun, south on East University ave-
nue, to the Engineering arch, west
on South University avenue, to Tappan
Hall, where it will swing back te
the Library. In front of this build-
ing, a picture of the group will b
taken.
Detailed plans for the assemblying
of the seniors has been made by the
committee under Snodgrass, to ef
ficiently handle the 1700 seniors. The
various classes of the different col-
leges and schools will form double
columns on the walks of the campus
which extend out from the medallion
in front of the Library. The time for
assemblying at 3:30.
Placards will be posted about the
walks in front of the Library stating
the place for each of the classes to
form. Following is the manner in
which the classes will line up prior
to swinging-out. ' To the rear of, the
business administration seniors, the
graduates of the Forestry school will
assemble. All classes will face the
medallion in front of the Library. The
Varsity Band which is to lead the pro-
cession will meet directly in front 1
of the Library.
Will Form Special Line
The senior Literary class will be

the first to swing-out when the pro-
cession, in double column, starts. Im-
mediately behind the Varsity band,
will be Robert Leland, president of
the Senior Lit class, and Courtland
C. Smith, president of the Student
council. Then will come the seniors
in the Literary college, with the wo- I
men leading. The other classes will
follow in this order: engineers, archi-
tects, medics, law students, dentists,
pharmacists, educational students,
nurses, students in the scoool of busi-,
ness administration, and forestry sen-
iors.
Different colored tassels will be
worn by the seniors of the various
schools. The specified colors are: lit-;
erary students, black; bngineering,
orange: architecture, orange and red;
medical, green; law, purple; dental,
lilac; pharmacy, olive; graduate, light
blue; nursing, green and white; and
business administration, drab.
I/ AUKD I I A1E Tfl

SELECT PULs TRMI WIL
PRIZE RECIPIENTS UI IGT
(By Associated Press) fU
NEW YORK, May 7--Thornt~n Wild- IN SECOND~ TRIENNIAL

SENIORS TO WEAR
I CAPS AND GOWNS
IFollowing their first appear-
ance today at swing-out, the
senior caps and gowns, will be
worn on the campus every Wed-
Inesday until Commencement, it
has been announced by John T.
Snodgrass, chairman of the
swing-out committee.

er's "Bridge of San Luis Rey" today
received the annual Pulitzer prize of
$1000 for being in the opinion of the
judges the book of the year which
best presents the whole atmosphere
of American life. Other awards for
endeavor in the world of writing and
journalism aggregated more than $15,-
000 in cash and also medals and schol-
arships.
The Indianapolis Times won the
award for rendering the most disin-
terested and meritorious public ser.
vice of any newspaper during the year.
It exposed political corruption in Ind-'
iana. Grover C. Hall, pf the Mont-..
gomery (Alabama) Advertiser won
the award for the best editorial of
1927, and Nelson Harding, of thec
Brooklyn Eagle, was recognized forE
his cartoons.
Eugene O'Neill won $1000 for
"Strange Interlude" as the Ameri-
can play performed in New York bestE
representing the educational value and
power of the stage in raising good
morals, good taste, and good man-
ners.
BUTTERFIE1L'S POLICY
APPHRD BY ALUMNI
Hammond Sends Telegram To Alumni
In State Enlisting Support
For President
CLAIM UNFAIR TREATMENT
(By Associated Press)
LANSING, May 7.-The first defin-
ite move of alumni in the Michigan
State college administration squab-
ble came today when Jason E. Ham-
mond, graduate of the class of 1886
and manager of the Michigan Dry;
goods association, sent a telegramt to
alumni of the college throughout the
state enlisting the aid and srfport
of the policy of Pres. Kenyon, L. But-
terfield.
Hammond, who claims t. be the.
spokesman for several Lansing alums-
ni of the college, served notice tbt
President Butterfield "does not in-
tend to resign." He declared the
President has been unfairly treated.
The text of the telegram followed in
part, "President Butterfield nas re-
turned from his trip to the Holy
land and has had a conference with
the, state board. Another meeting will
be held May 22. Action was taken
during his absence which is constru-
ed as an indirect request for his re-
signation. He does not intend to re-
sign. Michigan business and profes-
sional men, including alumni, have
carefully and impartially inquired in-
to the causes of dissatisfaction and
believe lie has been unfairly treated.
"They believe that prominent
Michigan State men and alumni ev-
erywhere should dem-and fair treat
men for a man of President Butter-
field's character and standing."
The arbitrary dismissal about three
weeks ago of Dean John Phelan, or
the department of education, and D
D. Willard, director of continuin, d-
ucation, who came to Michigan State
college during President Butterfeld'
regine and who were among his most
ardent supporters, came as a iiior
or less direct hint of the state board
of Agriculture's desire for Butter-
field's resignation.
Also the board's extension of Presi-
dent Butterfield's leave of absence,
which he had not asked for, is take.
by almuni as another indication of
the board's dissatisfaction with the
college administration. Butterfield
came to Michigan State four years
ago. There have been four presidents
of the institution in the last 10 years.
Norhwestern university will re-
institute its interfraternity council
and with it the former rsuhing rules.

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MEETING AT CHICAGO'

MORE THAN 300
EXPECTED AT
SESSION

DELEGATES
FIRST

BROOKS TODIRECT THEME
"The Interrelation Of The State, The
University, And The Alwmal"
Is Triennial Topic
Chicago will be the scene of the
Second Triennial of the University of
Michigan Alumni clubs which will be
held May 10, 11, and 12. Delegates
who have already registered for the
convention number 125, but this is
expected to swell to 300 or 350 by the
opening on Thursday morning, accord-
ing to Wilfred B. Shaw, '04, editor of
The Michigan Alumnus. Headquart-
ers for the alumni will be the Black-
stone hotel.
The theme for the Triennial has
been chosen as, "The Interrelation of
The State, The University, and The
Alumni." The theme will be intro-
duced on Thursday afternoon by Dr.
'Stratton D. Brooks, '96, who is now
President of the University of Mis-
souri and is the director of the Trien-
nial theme.
Little Will Speak
The first address of the regular
business session will be delivered by
President Little on Thursday morn-
ing. In this session the welcome ad-
dress will be given by Murray Blanch-
ard, President of the University of
Michigan club of Chicago, which is
acting as host for the event. He will
be followed by E. J. Ottaway, '94, who
will respond for the Alumni associa-
tion. In the afternoon Dr. Brooks
will present the theme of the con-
vention. After the address by Presi-
dent Jessup of Iowa the alumni will
consider the location of the 1931
Triennial. Friday will be occupied
with district meetings and various
alumni committee reports; President
Coffman of Minnesota will deliver the
afternoon address.
The present system of triennial con
ventions is the result of a reorganiza-
tion in 1924. Under this arrange-
ment the alumni clubs meet every
year in their districts, while every
third year a large convention is held
in any other city than Ann Arbor.
The first Triennial was held three
years ago in Detroit when 350 alumni
attended. At the present time there
are 165 alumni clubs grouped in 11
disricts, the whole being governed by
a board of 20 members.
DEAN TO MODIFY
BAN NEXT WEEK
According to an announcement
made yesterday by Joseph A. Busley
Dean of Students, the automobile ban
will be, to a certain extent, modified
between May 11 and 21. During this
time students accomplished by eith-
er one or both parents will be allowed
to drive cars.
Mother's day and the May festival
are the occasions which are respon-
sible for the partial relaxation. Be-
ginning at 6 o'clock Friday night, May
11, and ending at 8 o'clock Monday
morning, May 14 students will be al-
lowed to drive for the week end of
Mother's day provided the student
driver is accompanied by his parents.
Beginning at 8 o'clock Monday morn-
ing May 14 and finishing at 8
o'clock Monday morning May 21, the
week of the May festival, students will
be allowed to operate automobile's
under the same restrictions which will
be in force the previous week end.
The Weather
(By Associated Press)
Increasing cloudiness and warmer
today; tomorrow unsettled; warmer.

PRIMARIES IN INDIANA'
Iti
WILL BE HELD TODY
Repubicans' Presidential Preference
Draws Major Part Of Interest
In Preliminary Campaigns
WOOLEN IS NOT OPPOSED
(By Associated Press)
INDIANAPOLIS, May 7-Indiana
primaries campaign ended tonight in
a bast of platform and loud-speaker
appeas for support from the people
who tomorrow will make Republican
and Democratic choices for president,
U. S. Senator, and minor officers.
The Repubican presidential pref-
erence contest held the major share
of attention with both Sen. James A.
Watson, favorite son, and the forces
of Herbert Hoover, expressing confi-
,dence in the outcome. The winner in
the primaries will control Indiana's
33 delegates to the national conven-
tion at Kansas City.
Banker Also On Ballot
Evans Woolen, Indianapolis bank-
er, was unopposed in the Democratic
preference. Names written in on the
ballots will invalidate the vote. Polls
will' be open from 6 a. m. to 6 p. m.
Senator Watson returned to Indian-
apolis from Fort Wayne, a Hoover
stronghold. Tomorrow, he will go to
Rushville, his home town, to cast his
ballot and then will depart for Wash-
ington. Both Watson and M. Bert
Thurman, his national manager, ex-
pressed the opinion that a sweeping
endorsement would be given the vet-
eran senator's candidacy,
Oscar T. Follinger, of Fort Wayne,
Hoover's Indiana manager, predicted
a victory by a comfortable margin for
the secretary of commerce. Hoover
followers have realized that an India-
na triumph would give their man a
strategic position' at the national con-
vention, and have worked seriously
towards that end.
Rau Klux Klan Is Issue
The Ku Klux Klan and Anti-Saloon
league issues have had prominent part
in both the Senatorial and guberna-
torial contests, and involve candidate
of each of the major parties. Espec-
ially is that condition prevalent in the
senatorial race.
While U. S. Senator Arthur Robin-
son, who seeks renomination, has at-
tacked no one, and has welcomed all
Republican votes, one of his oppon-
ents, Attorney-general Arthur L. Gil-
liom, has stated he does not, want the
vote of any Klansman. "Republicanism
and Kianism cannot mix," he has de-
clared.
REHEARSALS END
FOR MEDIC PLAY
Final rehearsal for the four act play
to be given tonight at the annual All-
Medic Smoker was held last night.
With that, arrangements for the en-
tertainment sponsored by Galens,
medical honor society, were complet-
ed. The advance ticket sale for the
event resulted in a nearly complete
sell-out.
Beginning at Mimes Theater a four
act production will be given, together
with several acts of vaudeville and
music by Bud Golden's' orchestra.
About 11 o'clock, following the enter-
tainment at Mimes, the program will
be continued in the Assembly hall of
the Union where the Smoker itself
will begin and where added entertain-
ment is to ge given. No smoking will
be allowed in the theater.
A limited number of tickets will
be on sale at the Mimes theater when
the doors open at 7 o'clock tonight.
SENATE PREPARES
FOR BIG TAX ROW

(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 7.-The Senate,
cleared its decks today for the big
tax row--probably tomorrow-over the
reduction to be made this yea7. Be-
fore !it got down to clearing t'he
road of minor matters in order to
put on the Republican $200,000,000
plan versus the Democratic $325,000,-
000 plan tax-cut fight, the Senate
voted 46 to 31 to request the supreme
t 1 court to hear outside narties in the

BRITISH AMBASSADOR
SAYS THAT EUROPEAN
NATIONS WANT PEACE
SIR ESME HOWARD SPEAKS
TO AMERICAN PEACE
SOCIETY
CRITICIZESJOURNALISTS
Declares That Time Is Coming When
Nations Will Not Go To War
To Settle Disputes
CLEVELAND, May 7.-While wars
and rumors of wars make it exped-
ient not to discourage all preparations
for nation-wide offense, the .trend of
thought among the nations, particu-
larly those of Europe, is in the direc-
tion of peace, Sir Esme Howard,
British ambassador to the United
States, delcared tonight before the
World conference on international
justice.
Addressing the delegates of the
American peace 'society, unde whose
auspices the 'conference is being held'
here this week, Sir Esme expressed
the opinion that as the powers become
more accustomed to the idea that wars
belong to a past barbaric age they
will undoubtedly become able to dis-
card their navy and military arma-
ment's entirely. But this will be ac-
complished little by little, he said.
The British ambassador criticized
those journalists who try to "keep
alive public interest in the drama of
human nature," by constantly predict-
ing wars.
Names Main Obstacle
"There i's more joy on earth over
two sinners who break each others
ahead than over ninety and eight just
men who keep the peace. This is
then, I am convinced, one of the prin-
cipal obstacles in the way of educat--
ing men in the ways of peace.'
The attitude of the daily press, so
far as the new's values are concerned
inevitably means "flaming headlines"
to announce even the remote possibil-
ity of a conflict of some kind, where-
as if the cause of the trouble is re-
moved by negotiations it hardly re-
ceives any notice on the back pages,
said the 'speaker. But he hastened to
lay the blame for this, not on the
press, but on some "inherent kink" in
the brain of humanity."
"In spite of the journalists who are
always predicting wars," he said,
"every year that passe-s, sees an im-
provement in the European situation.
Nowhere in Europe today is there
more impressive evidence of a desire
for peace than in Germany. But it is
well so long as wars and rumors of
wars have not died away not to dis-
courage defense."
-__ ___________
PARDON GOES TO%
CORNELL MEETING
Edward C. Pardon, superintendent of
the Buildings and Grounds depart-
ment, left Ann Arbor late yesterday
for Cornell university: He will attend
a convention of Building and Ground
department superintendents to be held
there Monday, Tuesday, and Wednes-
day.
The aim of the convention, which
is held annually, is to give the var-
ions representatives an opportunity
to talk over their problems in round-
table discussion groups. Particular
stress is laid on construction and
maintenance work, Mr. Pardon ex-
plained yesterday, and the relative
cost of various methods employed also
receives consideration.

M'AFEE IS STAR
IN CONTEST HERE
f r
Bill McAfee
Wolverine right-hander, who played
a majorrrole in Michigan's win over
the Badger team yesterday, allowing
only four hits and striking out seven
batters. It was McAfee's sixth vicory

MICHI1GAN VANOUISHR~
BADGERS; 9-1:IN FIFTI
CONFERENCE VICTOR1
WOLVERINES BUNCH 12 HITS
AND PLAY ERRORLESS
BALL IN FIELD
M'AFEE GIVES FOUR HIT:
Varsity Chalks Up Fifteenth Game 0
Season In Handing Wisconsin
Its Third Big Ten Defeat
By MORRIS QUINN
Bunching their 12 hits behin( air
tight pitching by. Bill McAfee an
playing errorless ball in the field, th
Michigan nine celebrated its retur'
to Conference circles after a twelv
day absence by handing the Wisconsi
team its third Big Ten defeat of th
season yesterday afternoon at Ferr
field, 9-1.
The victory was the Wolverine'
fifteenth of the season and their fift

-'-------' - -'+7straight Conference success. In
of the season and his third success in
as many starts against Big Ten downing the Badgers they not only
teams. tightened their hold on first place :n
the standings, but also retained the
distinction of being the only unteat-
en team in the Big Ten.
While McAfee restricted the Car -
inal batsmen to four safeties, no two
ofwhich occurred in the same in-
ning, the Maize and Blue hitters had
better success with the offerings or
Jacobson and Momson, the badger
EditorIal Groups Of Gago Ai hurle, collecting 12 hits, including
Ensian Are Chosen By Thomas, Ihr oe an triple
Crane, And Lichtensteln Make Double Play
The Cardinals also played fault.
TO TAKE OFFICE AT ONCE less ball, their infield contributing a
double play in the fifth inning. Math-
Appointments to the editorial staffs ewson, visiting third baseman, con-
tributed the fielding feature of the
of the Michiganensian and the Gar- contest, inakng a fine one-handed
goyle were made yesterday by the stop of Reichman's grounder and
editors of the two publications, Thomas completing the throw to first in time
t h to retire the runner.
Thomas, '29, for the 'Ensian, and Phil- Corriden, starting his first home
lip Crane, '29, and Maurice Lichten- game at second, and Captain Loos al
stein, '29, joint editors for Gargoyle, short, played well for Michigan, each
handling 'a ninnmber of, difficult
Thomas, managing editor, announc- chances without a slip, while Bennie
ed the following appointments to the I1Oosterbaan , was the outstanding of-
editorial staff of the 'Ensian: woman's fensive threat with three hits to his
. credit. Winer starred at bat for Wis-
editor, Mildred Frandsen, '29, athletics consin with two safeties in' three
editor, Robert Brown, '30, seniors edi- trips to the plate, including a homer
tor, Stanton Todd, '30, feature editor After the hectic first inning in
'' I which Michigan combined five hits
George Leonard, '30, fraternity editor, and a walk for five counters and. prac-
Robert Adams, '30, activities, Henry tically put the game i n the bag, the
Brown, '30, and organization editor, elongated Jacobson acuepted Mc-
Robert Holmes, '30. Alee's challenge to indulge in a
Tpitching dual, and until the beginning
The new staff will take office at once of the seventh he held the Maize an(
and will begin work on the new plans Blue hitters well in check.
for the next 'Ensian. In the new Breaks Old Record
plans is included one for improve- Winer broke McAfee's record o
ment of the satire section, which will 23 runless innings against Big Ten
be directed by Adams. teams in the sixth when his hard hi
It was also announced that the 1928 took a bad bound over NebeIr.g'
'Ensians would be distributed as, soon head and rolled to the tennis courts
Eshearriveproablydistindaweskthe Badger outfielder crossing the
as they arrive, probably withn a week plate before the horsehide was re
or ten days. Stanton Todd was named layed to the infield for his team's onl:
in the announcement as acting editor run.
of the next Student directory. Michigan cam-e back strong in the
Crane, literary editor, and Lichten- seventh, which witnessed the demis(
stein, art editor, of Gargoyle for next of Jacobson after he had walked Neb
announced the following ap-. elung and Loos in succession an(
year,nnotedtol sa - Lange had singled sharply over sec
poitments to the editorial staff: re- ond. Momson was ruhed . to his re
view editor, Martin J. Cohn, '29; edi-~ ef, but a sacrifice and Oosterbaan'
tors: Alexander K. Gage, Jr., '30, Jer- single accounted for three mor) rut
ry Ellison, '30, William Emery, '29, before he succeeded in retiring th
Edwin Fisher Forbes, '29, Kenneth side.
Holmes, '29A, and Robert Newton, '29.1 BOX SCORE
Appointees to the staff were Margaret Wisconsin AB R H PO
Gentz, '30, Gurney Williams, '31, W. D. Cuisiner, If 4 0 0 0
Hillyer, '31, Dean Niral, Sylvia Klein Decker, ss 4 0 0 2
IIWiner, cf 3 1 2 4
'31, Arnold Becker, '31, Sherwood Ake, Massey, 2b 3 0 0 a
'31, Dorothy Wilson, '31, O. Boeck, '29, Momson, p & rf 1 0 0 0
Burton Lamfrom, '29A, and Barnarr Mansfield, lb 4 0 1 14
Rottenberg, '30. Beebe,rf-2b 3 0 0 0
Doyle, c3 0 1 3
COLLEGE SCORES Lynugh, c 0 0 0 0
-- Matthewson, 3b 3 0 0 1
Indiana 5, Northwestern 4 (baseball) Jacobson, p-rf 3 0 0 0
Northwestern G, Minnesota 1 (ten- Shorer, rf 0 0 0 0
nis) -
Iowa 2, Minnesota,1 (baseball). TOTALS 31 - 1 4 24
D 1117,Michigan AB R H PO
LGAIN OBSERVED Nebelung, cf 4 1 0 2
IN SL EE PY HoosLOWss 3 2 '1 0
iiange, 2 4 1 1 2
Gordon W. Packer, '28, and his Var- Costerbaan, b 4 1 213
. ,it' bnnrl
Weitraba, 3b 3 1 0 13

MAY PARTY TICKETS

BOA CONSTRICTOR AND TARANTULA
ARRIVE WITH CARLOAD OF BANANAS

I Today will be the last oppor- I
tunity to secure tickets for the
I Architects May Party, the corn- C
I mittee in charge has announced.
I They may be procured -this af- .
ternoon between 2 and 5 o'clock
in the lobby of the Union. I
C AP NIGHT TO BE A
T RADI T ION ALLY
Tradition coming back into its own
next Frida ,. ni ht will s-ee the freRh-

Two stoaways who have ridden on
the same vehicle all the way from
Central America arrived in town
yesterday, and immediately decided
to stay here. These two guests,
though uninvited and consequently
rather surprising, are now reposing

in a large glass palace
street, for men to ogle,
to admire, and women to
er.

on State'
small boys
scream ov-

Little Boa is about three feet long
and sleepy. Tarantula seems 'nore
aged, and just sits while the students
pass by, return, and gaze at- these
tropical creatures. As the window is
near the bus stops many waiters
voted thanks to the company yester-
day for the display. Busses were de-
layed, and cars stopped in the mid-
dle of the street with rotors running
while their drivers piled out to sVl
what the crowd was endeavoring to
see and stayed to see some more.
Women, shy of mice and angleworms
stooped and gazed at the reptile and
snider nttering little shrieks of

yIA g1U 11LLW1 tt, tl LIVI Iy Dans.
men become sophomores, as of old, in When the pot-clad freshmen reachi
historic Sleep'y Hollow, famed crema- the hollow just east of the University
tory of innumerable pots. Cap night hospital, the pyre will be touched off,.
will be celebrated in traditional fash- and as the flames mount skyward some
ion again-instead of being shunted, thousand battered headgear will de-
as last year, to barren South Ferry part for that enchanted bourne from
field. which no pot returns.
One year the freshman built a big "Where, oh Where Are The Verdant
bonfire and then threw their pots in Freshmen?" will then be sung to the
a piano box for the underclothed glory of freshman rhetoric, political
Belgians and Amenians, but barring economy, Professor Wenley, and the
that occasion and last year's fiasco alma mater. Other Michigan lyrics
the freshman hadee of office hnve will fnllnw withnchee ratorv. and

TOTALS
Score
Wisconsin
Michigan

jWeintraub, 3b
McCoy, If
Reichman, c
McAfee, p

3
4
4
4
34
by

1

1 0 1
1 2 0
0 1 9
1 2 0
9 12 27;
innings-
000 001 00
500 000 3:

L

These two vagabonds fron' the
tropics are a small Boa Constrictor,
and a fuller grown Tarantula! They
arrived in Ann Arbor on a carload
of 1-11- tho 4aki- niledaonnd

Two base hits-Oosterbaan, Re
man. Home runs-Winer, McA
Stolen bases--Mansfield, Nebelu
Sacrifice hits-Corriden. Bases

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