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May 06, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ESTABLISHED
1890

Jr

Air Ap
41
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alt

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 162.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1928.

EIGHT Pi

DIR ECTORS APPROVE PROPOSAL
TO15 ESALISH MERIT SYSTEM
OIF APPOINTING UNION OFFICIALS
ENTIRE MEMBERSHIP WILL ASSEMBLE
TO CONSIDER CHANGES IN METHOD.
OF APPOINTMENT
Again endorsing the merit system of choosing the president and
recording secretary of the Union, the Board of Directors approved
the project ,growing out of student suggestions whereby these officials
would be appointed beginning with the academic year 1929-30 by the
new board of directors.
The plan will be submitted to the entire Union membership at an
assembly to be held Wednesday, May 23. The exact changes to be made
in -the constitution will be worked out in committee early next week.
When it receives the remaining approval of the student body, the
project will change the selection of Union officials from campus election
to choice by the 17 members of the new board of directors which will
include eight students, four faculty men, three alumni, and two Union
officials. This group by considering the recommendations of the incumb-
ent officers, the hpplications of the candidates, and its acquaintance with
them will select the new officials on the basis of work done, ability,
and personality.

CAP NIGHT PLANS
NEAR COMPLETION;
Plans for the traditional ceremonies
on the Cap Night program are nearly
completed, according to John E. Star-
rett, '28E, in charge of the affair. Ar-
rangements to accommodate an un-,
usually large attendance are being'
facilitated by the installation of loud
speakers in various parts of the field.
The amplifiers are being installed by.
the Electrical Engineering department
under the supervision of Mr. Lewis1
N. Holland.
Students will gather on the Campus
at 7:15 o'clock, Friday night where
they will be formed in a procession
led by thebVarsity Band. The line of
march under the direction of Gordon
W. Packer, '28, Major Domo of the
band, will proceed to Sleepy Hollow
where the ceremonies will be held. !
Following the fulfillment of the
tradit'ons of Cap Night around ta
huge fire in the glen east of the Uni-
versity Hospital, a free movie will
be shown by the Butterfield Theaters.
Manager Hoag of the Michigan Thea-
ter announced that a picture selected
by a student committee at a series
of private showings would be given..
Several complete films were exhibit-
ed before this group in order that
an appropriate picture might be se-
lected.
The band will lead the procession'
back to the campusrfollowing the
completion of the program.1
Full details, including the speak-j
ers and events on the program, will
be .published early this week, ac-
cording to Starrett.
ANNOUNCES WITHDRAWAL
Frederick J, DeWitt, '29E, an-
nounced last night his withdrawal
from the race for Engineering vice-
president of the Union.
BALLOT
1, Wednesday, May 9'

SWING-OUT CEREMONY
TUESDAY WILL START
GRADUATION SERVICES

DEAN RATES SCHEDULED
DELIVER MAIN ADDRESS
BEFORE ASSEMBLY

TO

The resolution passed by the Board provided that "beginning with
the year 1929-30 the election of the President and recording secretary
for the following year be made by the outgoing board of directors." The
motion in receiving the unanimous consent of the board was approved
by Prof. H. C. Anderson of the mechanical engineering department,
Dean Carl Huber of the Graduate School, Prof. Evans Holbrook of the
Law School, J. A. Bursley, lean of students, Arch Diack, '92, Dan
Zimmerman, William Jeffries, grad.,
president of the Union, Roger Greene,
'28, recording secretary of the Union,F
Harold Isbey, '28M, medical vice-
president, and Paul Bruske, '28L, laww
vice-presdent and Paul Buckley, busi-
ness manager. Four interested stu- Alf-Campus Election
dents attended the meeting at the invi-
tation of the board. jSR C~JS- lc
The use of the entire board of direc- INSTRUCTIONS':-Place a
tors for the selection rather than a the name of the candidateI
smaller board of seven members as

cross in the square (
for whom you wish to

) before
vote.

{

An assembly of Union mem-
hers will be held at 7:30 o'-
elpck Wednesday, MVay 23 in
theassembly hall of the Un-
ion to consider the adoption of
a plan applying the merit sys-
tem of selecting the president
and secretary of the Union.
WILLIAM JEFFRIES,
President.

Student Council
(All Men Vote)
PiRESIDE NT
(Vote for One)
PAUL J. KERN
HARLAN P. CRISTY

Students' Christian
Association
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

[
[

PICTURE WILL BE TAKEN
Senior Process ion Will BerFormedI
'I Front Of ]Main Library
At 3:30 O'clock
Graduation activities for the class
of 1928 will start Tuesday afternoon
with swing-out exercises. This cere-
mony will be the first appearance of
all the seniors in their caps and
gowns. After. marching around
the campus, the graduating students
of the various colleges and schools
will assemble at Hill auditorium for
the exercises.
Dean Henry L. Bates, of the Law
school, will deliver the principal ad-
dress to the seniors at Hill Auditor-
ium. IHe has not yet announced his
topic, but the talk will concern "re-
flections on student life," Dean Bates
stated yesterday. The Reverend Hen-
ry Lewis, will give the invocation at
the exercises.
Complete plans for the formation
of the procession and the line of
march for swing-out are being an-
nounced today by John T. Snodgrass,
chairman of the committee -in charge.
The graduates will assemble in front
of the Main Library, at 3:30 Tuesday
afternoon. The various classes will
line-up on the walks extending out
from the medallion on the diagonal
north of the Library.
Seniors To Form On Campus
The classes will form in this man-
ner: Senior Literary students, on the
walk which extends northwest fronn!
the medallion to Waterman gymna-
sium, facing the Library. The women
students will be in front. Engineers,
on the diagonal south of the Library.
Architcts, behind the engineers,
Medical students, on the walk reach-
ing west to University Hall. Law Stu-
dents, behind the ,-medical students'
toward University Hall.
Students in the dental school will
form on the walk extending east to
the Pharmacology building, Pharm-
acy students, behind the Dental class.
Graduate students, on the walk ex-
tending outhwest to the old museum.
Seniors in the Educational school,
behind the graduate students. Nur-
ses, in the rear of the educational
students. Business Administration
seniors, behind the Nurses. All class-
es will face the medallion in front
of the Library. The Varsity band,
which is to lead the procession of
seniors, will form in front of the
Library. ; u3
Literary Class To Lead
The senior Literary class will be
the first to swing-out when the pro-
cession, in double column, starts. Im-
mediately behind the Varsity band,
will be Robert Leland, president of
the Senior Lit class, and Courtland
C. Smith, president of the Student
council. Then will come the seniors
in the Literary college, with the wo-
men leading. The other classes will
follow in this order: engineers, archi-
tects, medics, law students, dentists,
pharmacists, educational students,
nurses and students in the school of
business administration.
The line of march, as announced by
Snodgrass, will begin at the Library,
going north on the diagonal to North
University avenue, and thence to Hill
auditorium. Following the addresses
and other exercises in the auditorium,
the seniors will make a circle of the
campus. They will proceed east on
North University avenue to Barbour
gymnasium, south to the Engineering
Arch, then along South University
avenue, to Tappan hall, and back to
the Library. Here a group picture of
the graduates will be taken.
Different colored tassels will be
worn by the seniors in the various
schools. The specified colors are: lit-
erary students, black; engineering,
orange; architecture, orange and red;
medical, green; law, purple; dental,
lilac; pharmacy, olive; graduate, light
blue; nursing, green and white; and
j business administration, drab.
Placards stating the place for the
various classes to form, will be posted
in front of the Library and along the

various walks. to eliminate confusion,
according to the swing-out committee.
The Weather

FURTHER CHANGES
IN NOMINEES MADE
Robert C. Chapman, '30, and Le-
Verne Taylor, '30, were nominated
for the position of member of the
Board in Control of Athletics by that
body yesterday. Both Chapman and
Taylor have been active in athletic
work, and their names will be placed
on the ballot for the annual all-camp-
us election next Wednesday.
Wililam Edwards, '30, has with-
drawn from the race for membership
in the Student council, and Paul Min-
sel, '29, has withdrawn from the con-
test for literary vice-president of the
Union. and also froni the race for
membership on the Board in Control
of Student Publication's, though he is
still running for senior membership
in the Student council.
William Hayllar, '29D, has been
nominated by petition for vice-presi-
dent of the Union from the senior
dental class, and Henry Balgooyen,
'29B.Ad., has been nominated by peti-"
tion for combined vice-president of the
Union. No further nominations can
possibly be made for any of these
offices, it was announced by Courtland
C. Smith, '28, president of the Student
council, though withdrawals can still
be arranged.
ANNUAL CLASS GAME[S
'WON BY SOPHOMORES'

]
]

formerly proposed was preferred by
the board for the greater range of
judgment which it would give. Eight
student members will sit on the new
board compared to the three which
were slated for the original group.-
Five alumni and faculty men were
also added to the new group by the
change.
The application of the merit system
to the Union organization has follow-
ed the example of the publications.
The date of the appointments, the
recommendations and applications
will be used similarly. Organization
of the Union demands that a larger
board be used than in the publica-
tions.l
HONORRYFRATERNITY
Dr. Charles Grosvenor Osgood Speaks
At i itiation Banquet Of
Phi Beta Kappa
LAUDS EDUCATIONAL AIMS
"Trust yourselves as a force of in-
carnation, a force for the world's re-
generation and her salvation; do not
degrade to worn theories, devote your-
selves to the cultivation and establish-
ment of new ideas. Our greatest dis-
ease is the absolute distrust of high
standards of education,".Dr. Charles
Grosvenor Osgood of Princeton uni-
versity declared last night while
speaking at the initiation banquet of
Phi Beta Kappa. l-s subject was1
"Aristocrats in a Democracy."
"It is a significant fact," observed
Dr. Osgood, "that Phi Beta Kappa and
this great republic of ours were born
in the same year. The highest in-
tellectual achievement and true de-
mocracy are two great attainments.
They go hand in hand., The political
asnects of education must not be in-

WOLVERINES ARE VICTORS OVER
OHIO TRACKMimEN AT COLUMBUS;
HARVARD ROUTS MI1CHIGAN NINE

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)
] MARK ANDREWS
] DURWIN ALGYtER
] EUGENE EASTERLY
] ROBERT WARREN
] DAVID WHEELER
J JAMESON WILLIAMS
J PAUL MINSEL
] RAYMOND WACHTER
JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)

[r
[

]
]

CHESTER B. BENNETT
MARTIN MOL

Those who vote express themselves
as being in favor of the objectives of
the Student Christian Association.

Oratorical
Association
(Entire Campus Vote)
'PRESIDENT
ROBERT J. GESSNER
LYLE E. EISERMAN

Superior Numbers Of First Year Men
Enable Them To Triumph In
Free-For-All Contests
IS FOURTH STRAIGHT WIN
Victory in the cane-spree yesterday
morning at Ferry field, added to their
victory Friday afternoon in the tug
of war across the Huron, gave the
sophomore-s, led for the fourth time by
Walter Crego, '30, their fourth straight
class games'victory in two years.
This marks the first tie in four years
and the second in ten that a class
has won all of its class gaines.
The sophomores gained possession
of five of the nine canes and lost two
to the freshmen, the other two con-
tests resulting in a tie. The point
awarded for this event plus the two
points awarded Friday for their vic-
tory in the tug of war assured the
sophomores of a 3-2 margin in the
games.
In the obstacle race the first year
nien took two out of the three five-
man heats by large margins for a
clear-cnt victory. In the first heat the
sophomore number one man failed on
the second lap to climb one of the
two walls that barred his path, and
conceded the race to his opponents.
The sophomores took the second heat
by a good margin but dropped the
third by about half a lap, although
the race was hotly contested through-
out. Two walls to climb over, bar-
rels to dive through, a large tarpaulin
to crawl under, and two teeter-totters
to run over provided the obstacles for
the races.
Freshmen Win Rope-Tie
The rope-tying contest proved an
easy and decisive victory for the
freshmen who outnumbered their op-
ponents about three to two and man-
aged to tie up and detain 77 to the
sophomores 19. When the gun sound-
ed both sides stood their ground for
a long time before the freshmen at
length took the initiative and ap-
proached warily the sophomore pen
about 40 yards away.
The sophomores took their station
inside and around their pen, not dar-
ing to t-ake the offensive. Unwary
freshmen who approached too near
were pulled into the pen and tied
up by Crego and his men, while the
freshmen led by their captain, Wil-
liam W. Jamison, '31, seized on the
sophomores and made frequent trips
back to their pen with trussed-up
prisoners.
Sophomore Win Tug Event
In the tug of war Friday 'afternoon
the sophomores captured two of the
three tugs which gave them their
margin of victory in the games. The
first 50-man tug between two picked
teams from either class proved a
walk-away for the sophomores who
captured all of the spare rope and
pulled the struggling freshman team
half-way across the river. In the
second 50-man tug the freshmen got
the jump and pulled in about 30 feet
of rope before their opponents were
able to stem the rush and gain back a
ten-foot advantage which they man-
aged to hold until the 10 minues el-
apsed.
The free-for-all tug between the twC
classes turned into a rout when the
sophomores relinquished the rope as
soon as defeat appeared inevitable
The more numerous freshmen begar
reeling in the rope hand over hand
and the sophomores dropped it rath-
er than be pulled into the river.

THREE RUNS CHALKED UP AS
MICHIGAN OPENS WITH
DRIVING ATTACK
0OSTERBAANHITS HOMER
Asbeck Hurls For Wolverines; McCoy
Leads Rally For Home Team
In Fifth Inning
(Special to The Daily)
CAMBRIDGE, May 5-Before a re-
cord crowd of 10,000 here today, the
Harvard nine defeated Michigan, lead-7
er of the Western Conference, by a,
score of 8-5. Asbeck was on the
mound for the Wolverines, while Bar-'
bee, peer of the Crimson moundsmen,
hurled for Harvard.
The Wolverines started off by scor-
ing three runs. Nebelung and Loos
walked, but the, former was caught
off second in an attempted steal. Loos
crossed the plate for the first score
of the game, as Lange reached the
initial sack on an error. Corriden
slammed out a hard single, but Lange
was out when he attempted to reach
third on the hit. Bennie Ooosterbaan,
Michigan's much heralded eight letter-.
man, drove out the only circuit clout
of the contest sending Corriden home
ahead of him.
Harvard Ties Score
Harvard came right back and ev-
ened the count her half of the same
inning. Burnes and Chase walked,
and both came home on Donaghy's
sizzling two base drive. Lord rapped
out a timely single, sending Donaghy
in with the third and tying tally.
In the next two frames both hurlers
kept the opposing batters well in
hand. In the fourth, however, Har-
vard went into the lead, when a walk,
a two bagger, and Michigan errors
let in two more runs. The Crimson's
advantage was short lived, as Michi
gan knotted the count in the nexi.
inning.
McCoy led the Wolverine rally with
a single,.Nebelung walked, and Cap-
tain Loos, diminutive shortstop, sent
both his teammates home with a hard
single. The Harvard defense tighten-
ed at this point and successfully
stemmed the rising Michigan tide.
Michigan Scoreless After Fifth
During the remaining innings,
John Barbee, stellar Crimson mound-
sman, held the Michigan sluggers in
check, allowing no more hits. Asbeck,
however, was less fortunate.
In the seventh Harvard again aa
sumed the lead, touching Asbeck's
offering for three hits. Lord singled
and stole second to open the frame.
lHardy, pinch hitting for Sullivan,
smashed out his sixth triple of the'
season, scoring Lord. He came home
a mom'ent later on a wild throw,
from center.
The eighth inning saw Harvard
score the final run of the game. Chase
crossed the plate on a sacrifice fly,
after reaching first on an error.

MAIZE AND BLUE GAINS 77 !-
POINTS TO WIN OVER
BUCKEYE SQUAD
NETMEN SCORE 7-3 WD
Captain Barton, Moore, Schafer
Algyer Star In Gaining
Third Straight Win
(Special to The Daily) /
COLUMBUS, May 5.-Displaying
uigexpected superiority in several o
the track and field events, and es
pecially the last three on the pro
gram, the Michigan track tean scor
ed a decisive victory over the Ohi
State squad in their annual dual
meet this afternoon in the Buckey
stadium, 77 1-2 to 57 1-2.
With three events to be completed
Ohio State trailed the Wolverine
by a single point, but by taking al
three places intthejavelin throw
first and second in the broad jmn,
and first and third in the hammer
the Michigan team woneasily an
continued the jinx that has persiste
in bothering Scarlet and Grey team
for a quarter of a century in thei
track competition with Maize an
Blue.
The Wolverine's' vesteran hurdler
Don Cooper, rivaled George Simpson
of Ohio for individual honors of the
meet by winning the 220 yard high
hurdles in :24.1 and tieing with Rock
away, Buckeye ace, in the highs to
score nine points for the Maize and
Blue team. Jones placed second in the
lows while Kinney took third in th
highs.
Monroe Wins Mile
Randolph Monroe was second hig]
point winner and one of the outstand-
ing performers on the Michigan team,
After winning the mile in 4:27.6, hE
came back to finish second to Lomon
in the 880 ahead of Tooley who wo:

the event last year.
Ohio's great pair of sprinters Simp-
son and Kriss .finished one, two in
both the 100 and the 220, Captain Buck
Hester being forced to content himsell
with a third in each event. Simpson's
time in the shorter dash .was .:9.9
while he turned in the 220 in :21.5.
Michigan scored a slam in the quar-
ter mile, Seymore, Munger, and
Freese finishing ahead of the Ohic
entries. The Wolves also took al
three places in the javelin throw with
Beamen, Knoppe, and Ketz, finishing
in the order named.
Running in fine form, Ted Wuerfe:
outdistanced Baker ,Buckeye veteran
to win the two mile in the good tim
of 9:42.3, while Jesson, his teammate
Was third.
Katz Breaks Record
An Ohio-Michigan dual meet recor
went by the boards when Wilfrec
Ketz, big Michigan hammer thrower
won the event with a toss of 160 fee
9 5-8 inches. Ujhelyi of Ohio took see
ond, and Williams of Michigan, third
The Buckeyes scored a slam in th
discus with Rasmus, Tritten, and Cof
fee, placing one, two, three.
Bob Chapman, Wolverine sopho
more, took first honors in the broac
jump when he leaped 23 feet 1 7-
inches, with Arendt-taking second fo
the Farrell-coached team. Crooks o
Ohio was third. Anson, Ohio veter
an, outjumped both Felker and Wald
of the Michigan team to take firs
place; Felker was second, whil
Waldo and Coffee tied for the remain
ing place.
First honors in the shot put wen
to Tritten of Ohio with. Poorman an
Carlson of the Wolverine team fin
ishing second and third. Brown sco
ed an upset when, he cleared the ba
at 12 feet 4 3-4 inches in the pol
vault to defeat Prout and Eardley, th
Michigan entries.
(Summaries on Page 6)

I
'I

LUDWIG EMDE
DONALD KOCH
WILLARD LOWRY
J ENNINGS McBRIDE
ERNEST REIF
ROBERT SHORT
JOHN RICE
ROBERT DICKEY

[

]a

VICE PRESIDENT

I[

]l

Michigan Union
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

t
[

]I
]I

LAWRENCE WALKLEY
HAROLD CHARTER
SECRETARY
DOROTHY LYONS
MARGAR1T ARTHUR
TREASURER
LAWRENCE HARTWIG
JARL ANDEER
JOHN WEBSTER

1HARVARD AB
Burns, cf .........4
Chase, 2b ..........4
Donaghy, 3b and ss. 4
Lord, c ............4
Prior, lb.........4
Sullivan,'ss ........3
Whitney, 3b........0
Jones, rf.........4
Nugent, If........
Barbee, p.........3
*Hardie ..........1

,t

I[
t

I
]

C. FORD SCHOTT
WILLIAM E. NISSEN
RECORDING SECRETARY
(Vote for One)
KENNETH SCHAFER
WILLIAM SPENCER

C
C
C

I
]I
I

[
[

]
l

Board in Control oft
Publications.
(Entire Campus Vote)'
(Vote for Three)R

TOTALS ......32
MICHIGAN AB
Nebelung, cf ......2
Loos, ss ...........3
Lange, If ..........4
Corriden, 2b .......4
Oosterbaan, lb ....4
Weistraub, 3b ......4
McAfee, rf .........4
McCoy, c.........3
Asbeck, p..........3
TOTALS ......31
*Batted for Sullivan

R H
2 1
2 1
1 1
1 2
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 1
1 1
8s8
H H
1 0
1 1
0 1
1 1
1 1
0 0
0 0
1 1
0 0
5 5
in 7th.

PO
1
1
4
6
I0
1
0
3
0
1
0
27
PO
2
1
1
0
14
1
0
3
2
24

A
0
5
1
2
0
1
0
0
o)
1
0
-p
2
1.'
0
0
2
10

LITERARY VICE PRES.
(Vote only for one and only in your
department)

[
[

t

RALPH POPP
C02ARLES WHYTE
RICHARD HELMS
COMBINED VICE PRES.
hERBERT HUNTER
ROLAND DAHL
HENRY BALGOOYEN
LAW VICE PRES.
DAVID VOKES
t ALFRED BOWMAN
ENGINEERING VICE PRES.
10-m W ArLT,

I
I.
Ii
I
I
I.
I

ELLIS MERRY
CASSAM WILSON
GEORGE AFIN
WILLIAM PUSCH
THOMAS YATES
CHARLES SPICER
HOWARD KENYON
PAUL MINSEL
EDWIN FORBES

Score By innings
,Harvard............300 200 21x-8
Michigan .............300 020 000-5
Two base hits-Burns, Donaghy.
Three base hits-Hardie. Home run
-Oosterbaan. Stolen bases--Chase,
Lord. Saicrifice hits-Barbee, Don-
aghy, Prior. Errors (H)-Chase 1;
(M)-Nebelung, Loos, Weintraub 3,
Asbeck, 6. Base on balls off Asbeck,
5; off Barbee, 3. Struck out by Bar-
bee 5; by Asbeck 2. Left on bases-
Harvard 9, Michigan 2. Passed balls
-McCoy 2. Umpires Keller and Staf-

Tennis Team Wins
Annexing their third straight w
the Wolverine netmen dupli4at
Michigan State last Thursday
handing the Indiana team a 7-0 def
yesterday at Bloomington.
Bob Heaney finally emerged vict
ions over Quinn in the second sing
match after three hard fought SE
the last one going to six all bef
Heaney broke through Quinn's se
ice to take the ead and the mate
Captain Barton defeated Pike,
6-1, Heaney defeated Quinn, 6-1,
8-6. Schaefer defeated Davis,
6-2. Algyer defeated Hines, 6-0,
Moore defeated Nixon, 6-3, 6-3.
Captain Barton and Moore def
ed Pike and Hines, 6-1, 6-1. Alg

Fair today and probably tomorrow;
slowly rising temperature.

i

SUMMER DAILY APPOINT-
AMN ~ ni

__
11

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