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May 04, 1928 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-04

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ESTABLISHED
1890

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MEMBEF
ASSOCIATI
PRESS

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. .

VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 160.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1928.

EIGHT

w

IIR
TUG OF WAR IS
FIRST EVET I
ANNUA_GAMES1
TRIO OF CONTESTS TO MARK
ENCOUNTER OF CLASSES
SATURDAY MORNINGf
CREDO LEADS SOPIOMORES
Present Sophomores Enter Contest In
Attempt To Keep Slate Clean
After Three Victories
Beginning this afternoon with the
tug of war, the freshman and sopho-
more classes will vie in the tradi-
tional spring games for the semi-an-
nual championship of the campus.
At 3 o'clock the sophomores will gath--
er at Waterman gmnasium and the
freshmen in front of the Union to
march to the river, across which the
tug of war Will be contested.
At an enthusiastic gathering of
about 250 sophomores yesteriday aft-
ernoon, Walter Crego, '30, three times
captain of the class in the fall and
spring games, was unanimously elect-
ed to captain the class again. Wil-
liam W. Jamison, '31, was chosen Wed-
nesday by the freshmen to lead them
them against the sophomores.
]fold Three Tugs
This afternoon there will be three
tugs in all, two between picked teams
of 50 men from each class, and one
free for all in which all members off
the freshman and sophomore classest
will be allowed to compete. Two points
will awarded to the class which wins
two out of three of these tus.
At 9 o'clock Saturday morning the
two classes will assenble at the same
places to mailch to Ferry field for
the traditional cane spree, obstacle
race, and rope-tying contest, to the
winner of each of which will be
awarded one point. With the two
points awarded to the class which
is victorious in the tug of war, tpe
three points awarded Saturday morn-
ing will complete the scoring. The
class winning three out of five points
will be adjudged victor in the games.
The cane spree will be a contest be-
tween nine picked men from both
classes for the possession of the nine
canes. The obstacle rce will be run
in three heats of five men each with
two walls to climb over, barrels to
dive through, a large tarpaulin to.
crawl under, and two teeter-totters
to run over. The point for the ob-
stacle race will be awarded to the
class winning two out of three heats.
All To Compete
In the rope-tying contest all mem-
bers piesent of the two classes will
be furnished with five pieces of rope,
and two pens will be provided for the
respective classes in which to throw
their prisoners. Fifteen minutes will
be allotted/ for membe;s of the oppos-
ing classes to tie each other up. Full
permission, under the rules of the
game, is allowed the prisoners to es-
cape from the detention pens if they
can. The class having the most pris-
oners successfully confined in their
pen at the end of the 15 minute per-
iod will be adjudged victor in this
event and awarded one point.
Russel Sauer, '30L, chairman of the
games, has requested that officials for
the games report at 3 o'clock this
afternoon in the Union where Richard
Spindle, '29, will hand out badges. All
councilmen, M-men, and members of
honor societies are requested to act
as officials.
At 3 o'clock this afternoon the cap-
tains of the two classes will meet in
front of the Library where a coin
will be flipped to decide which class
will have preference as to which bank
of the river to pull from. The sopho-

mores will then carry the rope to the
river, and the frishinen will cross
the river to got their end of it. The
class winning the tug of war will have
the privilege of carrying the rope back1
up State street, and of having their
picture taken in front of Hill audi-!
torium.
AIRPLANE BOMBS
SCARE SHANGHA1
SHANGHAI, May 3-This city turn-
ed today from conflicting reports of
the warfare between the Nationalists
and Peking forces to the north to a
bit of "straffing" on its own doorstep.
Two northern planes, believed to
have come from the northern cruiser
Haichi, lying off Woosung, dropped
four bombs in attempts to cripple the
nationalist war vessel near the Kaing
nan arsenal. They apparently failed
of their object, but two women were
injured by the explosion of the bombs
near the Shanghai south railway sta-
tion.

POLITICAL FEVER CLIMBS RAPIDLY
AS CAMPUS REGISTRATION CLOSES
By Yellit

VICTORIOUS IN HOUSE,
M'NARY- HAUGEN BILL
TO0 CONFRONT SENATE

For the first time in the memoryI
of the oldest politician on the camp-
us, the Student council, after threat-
ening as usual to close the registra-
tion booths yesterday and Wednes-
day, has decided not to leave them
upen until noon today. With only
4,000 at the most who will be allow-
ed to vote, which means that only
5,000 or 6000svotes will be cast, the
district bosses of the gangs were
thrown into a turmoil last night, and
were anxiously sizing up their eligi-
ble constituencies as the Daily went
to press.
When the news leaked out of coun-

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cil headquarters after

dinner last

TICKETS FOR MOLNAR
PLAY TO GO ON !SALE
"Th iPlay's The Tiing" To Be
Produced Four Timies
Next Week

ight, it became impossible to get
;he number of any fraternity on the
ampus, and a large number of frbsh-
nen were pressed into a courier ser-
ice between the district headquart-
rs.
A prominent politician and hand-
haker from the senior class was
negotiating until a late hour last
ight with the Red Top and Checker
ab companies for cut rates on large
rders for election day, May 9.
A istant-to-the-dean Ha-hrvey Em-
ry's map of Ann Arbor, on which he
hecks off autos of which he has
reed the town, has disappeared from
is office and a certain politician is
uspected. This politician is famous
or keeping a map in his roon on
which favorable fraternities are
marked with a black pin, opposed
raternities with a white pin, and
doubtful ones with a red pin.
Odds on the different candidates for
ffice were fluctuating rapidly and
apparently without reason on the
State street curb until the ticker got
o far behind that it looked hopeless.
SPEECHES DUE TODAY
IN FORENSICCONTEST
Gold Medal And $100 Will Be Given
To Orator Winning
First Place
To HOLD FINALS MAY '20
All contestants in the second annual
Thomas E. N. Black oratorical con-
test must turn in their manuscripts
some time today at room 4202 Angell
hall, according to Prof. Richard D.
T. Hollister of the public speaking de-
partment. The previously announced

IS BROADWAYATTRACTION'
Tickets for Play Production's new-
est endeavor, '"The Play's The Thing,"
which will be presented at Mimes
theater Wednesday, Thursday, Friday,
and Saturday nights, May 9, 10, 11,
and 12, will go on sale at Mimes
theater and Wahr's bookstore next
Monday noon, according to Earl
Fleischman, of the department of
'speech and director of Play Produc-
tion activities.
The cast for "The Play's The
Thing," headed by Richard Woellhaf,
graduate student, who will play the
role made famous by Holbrook Blinn,
that of Sandor Turai, has been drawn
from the entire array of ,dramatic tal-
ent on the campus, instead of from
fany particular group or organization.
I Minna Miller, graduate student and
former head of the Junior Girl's play,
will- have the feminine lead and have
the part of Ilona Szaba. Other mem-
bers of the cost include Samuel Ben-
nel, '28Ed, as Mansky, Charles Holden,
'29, as Adam, Fred Crandall, '28, play-
ing Diverniticheck, Charles Peake in
the role of Almady, and George W.
Johnson, '30, as Me-ll.
Still On Broadway d
Much effort had to be exerted by
Mr. Fleischman to get rights for
the play as it is still a major attrac-
tion on Broadway in New York city
'with Holbrook Blinn and the entire
alsar cast. The play has had a su-
all-sta tour of the country and has
beslnfvorably received wherever pre-
sented. it is of a rather unusual
nature, as evidenced, for example, by
the fact that one act has three differ-
ent members of the cast. An old
Italian castle provide's the setting for
the production.
Satirical and sophisticated comedy
is the most appropriate description
for this work of Franz Molaar.
Special scenery and properties have
been designed by the stagecraft class
for the presentation next week and all
possible work will be done by the
group to strive to make the play one
of the most outstanding presentations
of the season.
Italian Airship Fhes
North Toward Pole
(By Associated Press)
STOCKHOLM, May 3.-The dirig-
ible Italia, in command of Gen. Um-
berto Nobile, noted Arctic explorer,
carrying Italy's hopes of notable dis-
coveries in the Artic, passed over
Sweden today, and toward evening
was reorted to the 'southwest of
Basa on the gulf of Bothnia.
The Italians set out from Stolp',
Germany, at 3:20 a. m. bound for
King's bay, Spitzbergen. General No-
bile has with him a crew of 16 and
1his fox terrier mascot, Titina, which
has been with him to the nort hpole
berore. Throughout the entire jour-
ney, thus fai, the expedition has been
I favored with beautiful weather. The
Italian glided up the coast of Swed-
end and circled over Stockholm just
fbefore noon. Greatvcrowds peered at
the huge dirigible as she sailed
splendidly, escorted by 10 Swedish
military planes.
FIVE WILL GO TO
1 eCLUB CONVENTIOA
d Five delegates to represent the Un-
iversity of Michigan club of Ann Ar-
s bor at the triennial convention o
- Michigan alumni clubs, which will
I b held the week end of May 10-12
_ s "raa aar v~t~r~.v

LAST

MINUTE MOVES
BY OPPOSITION
FAIL

TRIED

I
L
'Si
r1

FEAR VETO BY COOLIDGE
Measure Is Passed With Equalization
Fee 31achinery Included
Intact
!~(13y Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May .3.-Embody-
ing the equalization fee machinery
objected to by President Coolidge,
the McNary-Haugen farm relief bill
was passed tonight by the House.
The vote was 204 to 121.
The measure now must go back to
the Senate for adjustment of differen-
ces with that body, which several
weeks ago approved the bill by a
vote of 53 to 23.
As soon as these differences, none
of which are of major proportions,
are smoothed over the measure will
be ready for inspection by President
Coolidge. Some have predicted that
he will veto it as he did the original
McNary-Haugen bill last session.
The House action tonight at 7:30
o'clock came after opponents of the
fee had exhausted every preliminary
maneuver to remove it from the bill.
In the face of a series of reverses
the opposing group kept up its fight
and made two unsuccessful last-min-
ute moves to that end.
One was a motion by Representa-
tive Aswell, of Louisiana, ranking
Democrat on the House agricultural'
committee which drafted the meas-
ure, to substitute his own bill, sim-
ilar to the MeNary-Haugen measure
except for the equalization fee. rilhis

VIICHIGAN STATE, VARSITY BANDS
UNITE TO GIVE CONCERT TONIGHT
With the appearance of the Varsity the joint direction of two brothers-
and the Michigan State bands in for- Nicholas Falcone, director of the Var-
, al concert tonight at 7:30 o'clo k sity band here, and Leonard Falcone,
in Hill auditorium, a unique oppor- director of the Michigan State band.
tunity is offered to Ann Arbor lovers The program will be as follows:
of band music to hear for the first Norma Overture, Bellini; "M" Men
time on record two complete col- March, N. Falcone; In A Persian
lege bands joined to form a single Market, A. W. Katelbey; Stars and
playing uiit. The concert is open Stripes Forever, Sousa; Largo from
to the public, and no admission will Dvorak's "New World Symphony,"
charged. arranged by L. Falcone; Am v, ican
The concert tonight will nrark the Fantasia, Victor Herbert; and The
consummation of a growing spirit of Yellow and Blue.
friendliness and cordial feeling be- The two bands will unite again in
tween Michigan State and this Uni- a joint concert on "Saturday, May 12,
versity which has been developing at East Lansing, when they will play
'or several years and was marked re- before the assembled contestants in
cently by the establishment at Michi- the state high school band contest.
gan State of a chapter of Alpha Ep-
silon Mu, national honorary musical
fraternity, with the cooperation of
the local chapter.FIIH R GST A ON
Following tonight's concert a for-
mal dance will be given by the two
chapters of Alpha Epsilon Mu forF
zn-embers of the bands, members of
the Varsity glee club, and their
guests. The dance will be at the TALENT AND EARLY OUTLOOK
Masonic Temple., and the music will INDICATES WEALTH OF
be furnished by the State Travelers. GOOD MATERIAL,
The band tonight will consist of
about 125 pieces and will be under PRACTICE TO BEGIN SOON

7N

deadline was Monday of this week, but was rejected on a roll-call vote, 185
the time has been extended to give all to 146. . eetd
students interested a chance to try- 'otion Rejected
out. Only about 15 students have en- The Louisianan initiated also the
tered the contest so far. second futile attempt, a motion to
Drawings for the order of 'speeches send the bill back to the agriculturet
in the preliminaries, which are to be committee with instructions to re-a
held the first part of next week, were turn it without the fee and also at
made Tuesday in room 302 Mason hall, provision to give the proposed fed-
under the supervision of Professor eral farm board authority to enter
Hollister. Those who hand in manu- into marketing agreements for the
scripts today will probably be forced control of surplus farm crops. This ,
to take les's favorable places on the was defeated without a roll-call vote.t
order of speakers for the prelimin- Passage of the bill with the fee ma-
aries. The finals will be held May chinery intact was expected even byr
20 at 7:30 o'clock in the Methodist its opponents athough only yester-
Episcopal church, taking the place of day they succeeded in carrying a
the regular Sunday eveniog services motion by a vote of 141 to 120 ex-r
there. pressing disapproval of the fee.
A gold medal and $100 in cash will Farm bloc leaders, however, to-t
be awarded to the winner of first day quickly gathered their forces and
place, while a prize of $50 will .held the floor with a commanding
given to the contestant placing second st njority which repulsed every at- 1
Last year, the first time the contes, tack upon the bill. Then after con-
was held here, Robert J. Gessner,'29, sidera.tion of the measure had been
won first place, whe University de- completed under the procedu% per-
'29, a membercof se d n er d mitting amendments the farm camp
bate team, paain this year, but Gee- ireversed the defeat of yesterday and
snethas not entered the contest. passed the bill in the form it had
s adesired from the outset.-
A I TMost Objectionis" et
POLITICAL FIGHTS I Supporters of the bill contend that
LOOM IN TAX CUT the measure as passed by the House
meets all the objections raised by
(Special to The Daily) President Coolidge in his veto mes-
WASHINGTON, May 3-Tax reduc- sage on the old measure, with the
ioni must be confined within the $202,- lone exception of the equalization fee.
In addition, they urged on behalf of
700,00 surpus in sight for next yearn presidential approval of the measure
Chairman Smoot, of the senate finance that the farm board created under the
committee, informed theSenate toda bill, first would be directed to en-
in opening debate n the$20,00,0 dea vor to stabilize the agriculture in-
drafted by the committee as a sub- d'tyb otoln rpsrls
stitte afor5the$290,00000house mea- dustry by controlling crop surplus- I
sue passe$lastDecember. es by means of loans to cooperativeI
sure passed last December. rs organizations. The equalization fee
Taking cognizance of the prospec- would be employed only in the event
tive den000000 reduction Senator of failure of the loan provision to ac-
a $350000 rdcin-eao
Smoo, warned that any increase in complish relief.
Smootarnieduthtin yvisnrease i For this purpose the bill would
the revenue cutting p~rovision of thel authorize an appropriation of $400,-,
measuri beyond the $200,000,000 mark ' 0toe anaonathe revolvin'
'eant just that much of treasury de- 000,000 to be known as th rvli
meat 31fund, further they contended that the
The bill involves one of the maui loans to cooperatives was in line with
politilfihtlsn of the ma~tit the view's of Secretary Jardine, and-
political fights of the session but it hat if it proved effective the fee
came before the Senate almost with- nld be used. In view of these
out a murmur, aside from the opening changes, supporters of the bill ex-
address of Chairman Smoot. When he pres oethat the measure would
had concluded it was laid aside untilmeet wit.h presidential approval de-
tomorrow when Senator Harrison, of spite expressions of administration
Mississippi, plans to present the ,Dem- leaders to the contrary.
ocratic viewpoint. ___________
CONGRESS TO SEEHANFORD RESIGNS1
CnGREYAATEVEA[CFROM UNIVERSIT Y

RANKIN WILL ACCEPT
NEWY POSTNEXT FLL
Northfield, Minnesota College Offers
English Professorship
For Next Fall'
23 YEARS WITH' FACULTY
Prof. Thomas E. Rankin, of the
rhetoric depar'tment, will end a 23
years' connection with the university
at the close of the coming summer
session, he anounce last night. Pro-
essor Rankin has accepted an offer
to become professor of English at
Carleton college, Northfield, Minn.
A graduate of the literary college
in 1898, Professor Rankin received
his master of arts degree in 1905. He
also completed some graduate work,
then accepted a position as profes-
sor of English history at the College
of Emporia, Emporia, Kansas. After
spending three years at Emporia he
returned to Michigan and has con-
tinued as a member of the rhetoric
:'aculty until the submission of his
resignation effective in August.
He has been secretary of the sum-
mer session of the University for 17
years and a lecturer in the extension
department since the inauguration of
the extension division of the Univers-
ity. As a speaker he has confined
his subjects largely to educational
and literary topics.,
A contributor to various literary
And critical magazines, Professor
Rankin is in addition the author of
several books including, " Materials
for the Study of Rhetoric and Compo-
sition," with J. R. Brumm. "The Me-
thod and Practice of Exposition;"
"American Authorship of the Present
Day;" and "English Literature," and
"History of American Literature,"
written with W. M. Aiken.
Before coming to the University.
Professor Rankin was a student at
Princeton University in 1897 and lat-
ex' studied at the San Francisco The-
ological Seminary.
TWELVE WILL BE
HONORED TONIGHT
BY SOCIAL GROUF
In respect to their outstanding
scholastic standings in sociology and
other social sciences, 12 students will
be admitted to membership in Alpha
Kappa Delta, national honorary
sociological fraternity, at the annual
spring initiation banquet to be held at
6:30 o'clock tonight in room 316 o0
the Union.
As the principal speaker for the af-
fair, the local honorary society ha
secured Dr. William F. Ogurn, pro
fessor of sociology at the University
of Chicago. Dr. Ogburn posses'ses a
national reputation for his work i
the social sciences, and prior to coin
ing to Chicago this'year he was a pro
fessor at Columbia university. Hi
topic has not yet been announced
Prof. Charles H. Cooley of the sociol
ogy department, will also speak on
the program
Those who are to be taken into thi
fraternity tonight are: Victor Rose
'29, Vahan D. Sewny, '29, Helen Mi
halyi, '29, Bernice McHale, '29, Pear
Waldman, '29, iMaurice Klass, '3(
Jean Gilman, '30, Margaret Gentz, '2
Dorothy Haas, '30, Roy Ullman, grad
Edward Jandy grad., and Catherin
Woodroofe, '29.
WILL HOLD CLUB BANQUE

Originality In New Production
Be Sought By Officials In
Charge Of Opera

Registration for the various cast,
chorus, and committee positions for,
the 1928 Michigan Union Opera was
completed yesterday with great suc-
cess in point of numbers enrolled and
general outlook on talent available,
according to 'alton D. Walper, '29,
recently appointed general chairman.
Furthermore several books have al-
ready been received, in which many
new ideas have been injected, point-
ing to greater originality and novelty
than ever before, say those who have
read the material.
Announcement will be made within
the very near future as to the date
of the first practice and.organization
of those who will be connected with
next year's production. Word receiv-
ed from Roy Hoyer, for several years
leading man with Fred Stone of "Criss-
Cross" fame, indicates that he will
definitely be in Ann Arbor about May'
15 jo personally supervise thelspring
practice work and to acquaint the try-
outs for positions with many new
dance routines planned by him for the
1928 presentation. He has directed
the dance numbers for, the last 12
years with the exception of last year
when duties with Fred Stone pre-
vented him from being here..
Music To Feature Show
New, snappy, and catchy music sung
by voices that will be, carefully picked
from the available talent are to fea-
ture the coming show, according to.
E. Mortimer Shuter, director of the
entire 'production. Theodore Harri-
son, of the School of Music, and di-
rector of the glee club, will have
charge of the singing and all musical
work in connection with the Opera.
Any who write music for the show
are urged to put their ideas in tangs-
ble form and they will soon be given
an opportunity to play their music
before that committee. This policy
will be followed this year instead of
having the music written by one or
two persons. In this way it is hoped
that the Opera will be able to boast
vast improvements along musical
lines.
Ask For Book Ideas
Any interested in writing the book'
who have not yet conferred about the
work, are urged to communicate at
once with Donal Hamilton Haines of
the journalism department, so.that ar-
rangements can be made for a con-
ference and explanation of what i
desired.

Will1

0919['T91DOWNS COLGAITl
IN CLOSE 6A'M
NEBEIUNG SCORES THREE Ri
AND STARS IN FIELD IN
VARSITY TRIUMPH
PLAY SECOND GAME T)D
Beinle Oosterbaan Slated To P1
Today, With Cottrell In
Box For Maroons
(Special to The Daily)
HAMILTON, May 3.-Michigan
ened her three game invasion of
Easte by registering a 5-2 victory o
the Colgate nine this afternoon
Whitnall field in a game that "
featured by the steady play of b
teams. It was the first encounter
a two game series between the
gregations, the second being shi
1 uled for today.
Both McAfee and Doddona' pite
tight ball for the first two innn
but in the third triples by McCoy
Nebelung, and a single by Loos g
the Wolverines a two run lead. (
gate tied the score in the fot
frame, when Acker reached first
McAfee's error, advanced on Ha
sacrifide, and scored on a double
Detore, who also crossed the pl
a moment later on Steinberg's sin
In the sixth Michigan added ao
er marker to her total. Nebelr
walked to open the inning, Loo s
rificed him to second, and the
verine center fielder scored w
Corriden hit a single. Oosterbaan e
ed the inning by flying out to Al
With a one run lead McAfee ttg
enred up and caused Colgate's sevl
inning rally to fall short of ever
the count after Welch had sing
and Jones had sacrificed him to I
ond. During Michigan's turn at
in this ining Allan made the fiele
feature of the contest, a senatih
Icatch 6f Weintraub's long fly in
left field.
Score Two In Eighth
Michigan cinched the game by si
ing twice In the eighth inning t'o i
a commanding lead that was ne
threatened. Nebelung doubled
start the inning and Loos sent
to third with' a single, from there
scored and was folrowed across
plate by Loos on Oosterbaan's I
double. Weintraub ended Michig
scoring by sending a fly to left.
Colgate rallied again in the ei
when Hagy singled after Acker
grounded out. Detore flied out,
Steinberg singled sending Hagy
third, but McAfee ended the threa
tossing out Bridges at ' first. In
ninth inning both teams were ret
in order, Dowler. pinch .hitting
Daddona ended the game by groun
, out, McAfee to Oosterbaan
Both pitchers went the route
succeeded in keeping the hits
scattered. The invaders outhit
Maroons 11-8. Nebelung starrec
bat and in the field for the Wol
ines, while two double plays, J.
triple, and Allan's great' catch
Weintraub's gly were thei feature
Colgate's play.
Following the game this after:
Coach 'Ray Fisher announced tha
I will probably start Bennie 00
ibaan on the mound today,
Gawne slated to hurl part of
contest. Cottrell, Colgate's s
@ tional sophomore pitcher, is s
t uled to oppose the Wolverine tw:
f with Gardner, a veteran, held it
- serve.

I

Seniors To Don Caps'
And Gowns Tuesday
In Annual Swing-out
Following the swing-out exercises
of the senior class, next Tuesday
afternoon, graduating students will be
expected to wear their caps andf
gowns on the campus each Wednes-
day, according to John T. Snodgrass,
'28, chairman of the swing-out com-
mittee.
The first appearance of the caps and
gowns will be at the 'swing-out, the
opening of the graduation activities.
The affair will be conducted in prac-
tically the same manner 'as in past
years. Definite, detailed plans for the
line of march, the formation, and sim-
ilar matters, .are now being worked

MICIIGAN AB
Nebelung, cf......3
Loos, ss... .....4
Lange, if.........3
Corriden, 2b.....4
Oosterbaan, lb ....4
Weintraub, 3b ..4 0
Straub, rf.........4
McCoy, c.........4
McAfee, p.... . . 4
TOTALS......34
COLG.ATE AB
jAllan, If ............ 4
Bonacker, rf......4
Hagy, lb..........3
Detore, ss........4.
Steinberg, 2b ......3
Bridges, 3b.......4
Welch, "cf..........4
a ones, c ...........3
Doddona, p.......4

R
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
5
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
or

H T
2
2
1
2
1
0
2
1
0
11
0
9
1
2
2
0
1
1
1
R

5

k
I
r

AI RPLANE G TAC l lt,-
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, May 3.--The .ad-
vance guard of a score of senatoms
and representatives headed south
from Bolling field today to witness
the air corps maneuvers tomorrow
and Saturday at Langley field, Vir-I
ginia, in which nearly a hundred air-
craft ranging in size from speedy lit-
tle pursuit planes to big transport
planes, will demonstrate their fight-
ing tactics.
Th ,n-r-,nn q_ - a. .mbr o

Prof. James H. Hanford of the Eng-
lish department has accepted a cal
to Western Reserve where he will be
in charge of graduate studies in Eng
lish. Professor Hanford came to
Michigan six years ago from the Uni
versity of North Carolina to take
charge of graduate studies in Eng
fish here. He has specialized in Re
naissance and medieval literature, an
especially in Milton.
It was also recently announced tha
Prof. Charles C. Fries has turned down
- .-01t . iiowl the deartmenft of -

,t
a

J.

TOTALS
A. Dowler

......33
batted f

j Members of the senior class
may obtain caps and gowns at.
Moe's Sport shop. Paraphernalia I
mu - be readv for use .Tue

9th.
Michigan. ........002 001
Colgate.............000 200
Two-base hits-Detore, Da
Nebelung, Oosterbaan. Three
hits-McCoy, Nebelung, Jones.

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