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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 03, 1928 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

STATE COEGE RAND
ILL APPAR JOINTLY
YWITH UNIVERSITY UNIT
CONCERT FRIDAY NIGHT WILL
MARK CLOSER CONTACT
BETWEEN SCHOOLS
ADMISSION WILL BE FREE
Alpha EpsilouMu To Give Dance After
Progratu At Masonic Temple For
Players And Guests
When the Michigan State college
band comer here Friday night to play
a combined concert with the Univer-
sity band at 8 o'clock in hill audi-
torium, it will be not only the first
time in history that two college bands
have given a joint concert, but also
the culmination of a movement toward
increasingly friendly musical relations
between the two institutions, which
has been fostered by Robert Camp-
bell, treasurer of the University and
band supervisor, Nicholas Falcone, di-
rector of the Michigan band, and his
brother, Leonard Falcone, director of
the band at Michigan. State.
The concert, which is open to the
public, will last about an ]hour. The
pr grai to be played under the joint
'irection of, te Falcone brpthers is
as follows; Norma rOverture, Bellini;
"M" 'Men March, N. "Falcone; In A
Persian Market, A. W. Katelbey; Stars
and Stripes Forever, Sousa; Largo
from Dvorak's "New World Symph-
ony," arr. by L. Falcone; American
Fantasia, Victor Herberw.
After the concert there will be formal
dance at the Masonic Temple for the
members of the bands and their guests
under the auspices of the Michigan
and Michigan State chapters of Alpha
Epsilon Mu, national honorary musi-
cal fraternity.
It is hoped that the joint concert
will be an annual affair. "We are
very happy," said Treasurer, Camp-
bell, band supervisor, yesterday, "to
have the M. S. C. band as our guests
and to join with them in an occasion
so unique and so important as an
indication of renewed friendship and
cooperation between the two institu-
tions."
The Michigan band is planning to
return the visit of the M. S. C. mu-
sicians on May 12, when the state
public school band contest will be'
held at East aLnsing.
Postal Scales Used
By Professors Make
Them Py Too Much
University professors have been
cheating themselves by using postal
scales which give over-weight for ev-
erything above a 'few ounces, it was
found in an inspection trip of all
Univerpity buildings made yesterday
by the state scale inspector of the De-
partment of Agriculture and Irving
W. Truettner, maintenance inspector
of the Buildings and Grounds de-
partment.
The men carried a truckload of stan-
dard weights with them, ranging from
an. ounce to a thousand pounds. They
tested about 120 scales, and found 6
that were in so poor a state of repair
as, to be useless. Many of the scales
had to be slightly adjusted, according
to Mr. Truettner, but the state in-
spector was quoted as saying that on'
the average the accuracy of the scales
was unusually good.
An explanation was found to a prob-'
lem which had for a long time been
puzzling doctors and internes at the

University hospital-why it was that
patients suddenly lost or gained a'
great many pounds weight. The rea-
son was merely that sometimes a pa-
tient was weighed one day on a scale
which registered a pound or two over-
weight, and the next day on a scale
which showed some ounces under-.
weight.
No inspection was made of the
small beam balances used by students
in the scientific laboratories, so stu-
dents can still account for incorrect
results in their experiments by say-
ing that the scale they used gave
erroneous results. It is expected that
students will be petitioning to have
spring scales installed in all labora-
tories, since it was found that all
spring scales were more or less in-
accurate.-
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY.-Priz-.
es :aggregating $270 are being offered
by Pi Delta Epsilon national honorary
journalistic fraternity in a contest for
the best editorials publi'shed in col-
lege journals during the past year.
TYPEWRITING and
]IU1MEOGRAPJJNG
a specialty for
twenty years.
Prompt Service, Experienced Oper.
ators, Moderate Rates.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 615.
RAE
NOW-
I mDrwNIa u rir

MUSSER TO HEAD
MEDICAL SCHOOL

News Front Other Colleges

J

J

CHINESE SOLDIER
KILLS MISSONARY

1

GLEE CLUB OF ROCHESTER
1I E'URNS FROM EXTENDEI) TRIP
UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER-
Twenty-five members of the glee club
have returned from a trip which in-
cluded a radio broadcast over. WGN,
Chicago, concerts to ten thousand
Chicago high school pupils, visits to
the University of Michigan and the
University of Chicago, and three re-
citals in Detroit and Buffalo.
RECK hALL, OLD DORMITORY
AT HARVARD, TO BE WRECKE)D

1 ElGHT PRIZES IN'LANDSCAPE
EVENT WON BY ILLINOIS MEN
UNIVERSITY OF!ILLINOIS-Eight
of the sixteen prizes offered by the
American Society of Landscape Arch-
itects in an interscholastic competi-
tion were won by students here. First
prize was won by H. J. Hanson, '28.
vFI'ORT SHOWS SCHOLASTIC
MORTAL Il HAS DECREASED
PRINCETON- A recent report to
the trustees here reveals that scholas-
tic mortality has decreased considera-
bly. ,During the first term of 1926-
27, 47 undergraduates were requested
to leave because of scholastic de-
ficiencies. In the first term; this year
only 27 were dismissed.

NWurster Asks That
Dogs Be Vaccinated
To assist his department in the en-
forcement of the quarantine regula-
tions on dogs in Washtenaw county,
laid down by B. J. Killham, state vet-
erinarian, Sheriff Ernst M. Wurster is
seeking the co-operation of dog own-
ers of the community.
When rabies was found to be preval-
ent in this county the 'state provided
that.-all dogs, unless properly vaccin-
ated within one year by a qualified
veterinarian and tagged for ready
identification, must be securely
chained or otherwise confined; or, if
allowed to run at large, must be se-
curely muzzled.
The sheriff's department has recom-
mended, as a precantionary measure
for both dog owners and others, that
all animals allowed to run at large be
muzzled, even though vaccinated.
6-

G

U

"Problems of dist ribution are
such prime importance that disc
tion accounting is reachiug the
held at the present by cost acc
ing," said Professor loward C. C
of the Ohio State university, spe:
on the subject "The Analysis of
tribution Costs" before Business
miniistration students.
Professor Greer, who at prese
I director-accountant of the Inst
of American Meat Packers, attril
the inferiority of dlistribution acct
ing to the fact that the machine
distribution or distribution acc
lug has not been well develop<
the past. Takin~g as an illustr
a problem in the meat, packing
dustry which was indicative of a
eral problem, Professor Greer (ie
strated how customers, territories
types of production can bring a
to the producer.

Dr. John H. Musser
Who has been named president-elect
of the American College of Physi-
cians,taking office in 1929. Dr. Mus-
ser is a professor of medicine at
Tulane university, New Orleans, and
is the author of several medical textj
books. During the war he was a
major in the army medical !corp's.f

CROCKE-R -HAS -Al
Injmuct Of English On Ja
Subject Of Story Puta
In April Issue
IS TEACHER OF

iTICILE
panese Is
4isedC
SPEECH

"The Impact of English on Japan-
ese," an article by Lionel Crocker,
of the speechi department, is included1
in the April issue of the "English
Journal," the official organ of the na-
tional council of teachers of English.
The material, for this article was'
gathered by Mr. Crocker during the
year 1921-1922, when he taught in
the English department of Waseda
university, at Tokyo, Japan.
"English has becone so much a
part of the Japanese people in the
last fifty years that it has been right-
ly called the second language of the
empire," he says. He then goes on to
tell how the night schools of Japan
are crowded with ambitious men, wo-
men, and children who want to in-
crease their earning capacity by a
knowledge of the English language.
Mr. Crocker recalls a significant in-
cident which occurred while he was
teaching in Japan, and which clearly
shows the influence of English on the
Japanese. When he asked.a language'
student who had been in Japan for,
25 years whether English had had any
effect on the structure of the Japan-
ese sentence, the student replied, "My
general reaction to the main question
is that there has been a definite in-
fluence. No one who has heard var-
ious Japanese speakers and who has
compared addresses of those speak-
ers knowing English with those who'
had no acquaintance with a European'
tongue could doubt the effect of the'
foreign-language study. It is shown"
in a more direct style, briefer sen-
tences, and a more 'snappy' construc-'
tion."
PURDUE UNIVERSITY. - Fifteen
juniors were initiated into Tau Beta
Pi national honorary engineering fra-
ternity in a recent initation here.

HARVARD-Beck Hall, student dor-
mitory for 51 years, has been beught
by a trust "for business prposes,"
and it is rumored that it is going to
be torn down to make room for a
more modenn building. Many of the
most sacred of Harvard traditions
are connected with the building and
records show that loyal graduates
have reserved rooms init for sons
still attending kindergarten.
EMPLOYMENT IS NO EXCUSE
FOR POOR SCHOLASTIC GRADES
Faculty members of the University
of Minnesota will no longer make
concessions to students on the plea
of self-support. The working stu-
dents have become so numerous the
employment will not be taken as an
excuse for poor scholastic work.
The reason given ,for this action
is that this excuse became to be used
as a dlodge to escape study. The Min-
i nesota Daily says that employment
bureaus report that fifteen per cent
of the students who take jobs do so
that they may be able to use their
outside work as a means of obtaining
concessions from the faculty.
Iix ENGINENkiNG PROFESSORS
SELECTED FOR TAU BETA PI
HARVARD-Six professor' of the
Engineering school were recently
elected to Tau Beta Pi, engineers'
honorary society for "having foster-
ed a spirit of liberal cultu;e in the
Engineering school."
Adams Says Student
Must Develop Mind
"There is a loss and no insurance
if the student is not given the oppor-
tunity to think as well as to learn,"
stated Professor Henry F. Adams in
dnswer to a statement by Delton
Thomas Howard, professor in psy-
chology at Northwestern university,
in which the latter questioned the
creative resources of the student mind
and doubted the wisdom of allowing
them to make their own solutions.
"There are four stages in the pro-
gressive development of the mind,"
Professor Adams stated. "The first and
primary acquirement is a background;
the second step is the power of crea-
tive thinking; the third stage is the
ability to detectsmental flaws and to
overcome these deficiencies; the
fourth and last attainment in mental
development is the ability to apply
the knowledge acquirgd in the first
three steps. By the time one has
reached his sophomore year in college
he should have attained his back-
ground and be ready to advance to the
stage of creative thinking."

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
HOLDS ALL-CAMPUS CIRCUS
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY-
A giant all-university circus in which
over 1000 men and women students
actively participated scored a big suc-
cess here recently.
BUSINESS SCHOOL
ISSUES BOOKLET
"Sales Quota Systems," a booklet
by Prof. Clare E. Griffin, acting dean
of the School of Business Aministra-
tion, has recently been published. It is
one of a series of Michigan business
studies published by. the Bureau of
Business researchbof the business
school.
In this booklet Professor Griffin
surveys the existing practice in setting
sales quotas and considers the useful-1
ness of different methods and their
adaptability to different objects.
Sanders Will Talk
On New Testament
"The New Testament and the Papy-
ri" will be the subject on which prof.
Henry A. Sanders of the Latin de-
partment will speak, Wednesday, May
9, in Natunal Science auditorium. This
is the annual Henry Russell address,
and at this meeting the recipient of
the Henry Russell award will be an-
nounced.

Dr. Walter F. Seymour
-Who was killed recently by a
Chinese soldier who accused him of
hiding wounded soldiers. Dr. Sey-
mou-r was superintendent of the Pres-
byterian Board'of Mibsions hospital at
Tsining, China.
Matthews To Speak
On Church Program
Celebration of the hundredth an-
niversary of the First Baptist church
will be held Sunday morning, when
the new pipe organ will be heard
for the first time by the local con-
gregation.
Dr. Shailer Matthews, dean of the
divinity school at Chicago university,
Will occupy the pulpit for the special
service and his sermon topic has been
announced as "Is the Church Being
Outgrown?" Mrs. Emma Fisher Cross
will be at the organ for the dedication
numbers which will be part of the
centenial observance.
An organ recital will be given at
4:15 Sunday afternoon by Palmer
Christian, University organist.= The
congregation of the church will as-
semble Thursday evening for a din-
ner at which a program of remin-
iscenses will be conducted.

H. Studwig, Piano
Don Bastion, Saxophone
Reg Thornton, Saxophone
Virg Fisher, Saxophone
Wm. Huschell Violin

Bud Fisher, Trumpet
Tex Lee, Trombone
Geo. Rice, Banjo
Crozier, Bass
Tompson, Drums

. >Y a:.4. ;.= txpv. rr.. :t : ].. a4 C: i .4Tr. .. ;: . e;-. ,..

Opening Dance
HY STEED ANb HIS ORCHESTRA

I hitmore Lake Pavilioi
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
May 4-5

Pay Cash and Save!

49PayCash and Save!

10 s

DAY

IRE

SAE

We offer in this sale nothing but first quality and highest type of tires mnanuf actured by the'
following companies.
We have a complete stock of cheaper tires than are listed in this sale for less money.
^ pay cash to save. You can pay cash and save. Compare these prices with highest qual-
ity tire prces of pay as you ride or mail order houses.

15% Discount
You will be surprise at the' saving you can make each
month, by bringing your laundry work to the Cash and Carry
Office of the White Swan Laundry. We give a 15% dis-
count on all work.
Whit Swa Launry o o.
CASH AND CARRY OFFICE
Maynard St., Opposite the Ma . Open 7 a. m. to 8 p. m.
Ct RN' ELLCOAL C"K

300.3
3M x4
:t 4x4
315-x4
32i, .i

Vacuum Cup Tires
HIGHER QUALITY TIRES
C I. ..................$
C . ..... ..................
l. Oversize .................
Full Oversize.............
SS". Olersfze ...............
SS. St. Size ...............
5. St1. Size...............
Full OversIze ..............
Full Oversize.............1
7 B oon . ....................1
1 Balloon................... 2

7.75
7.85
7.95
8.95
12.84
9.95
13.95
18.18
20.48
A.)1

Retter Tires Are Not Made
30x5 iDouble 0. . Extra
Heavy Duy. This tire will
take 11110 place of 32xG and
vill -not use quite as much
engine power as the regular
S2x ..-..........-....:.87

Cooper Tires

Corduroy Tire & Rubber Co.
SIDE WALL] HOOF--IfHfGEST QUALITY
TIRES--PAY CASH AND SAVE
3x475 ............................. ....11.66
30x4.95............................ 12.1

(

30x .25 I. I.])..........................
30x5.77 hI. D ........................

16.82
19.87
17.39

:31x5.25
:32x6.20)

H. . ).......................
It. 1). ......... ......... ........

Goodyear All Weather
Tread
30x5 'ruck ................ ....... 25.47
33x6.0O BalOn... ...........17.91
PAY CASH AND SAVE
Firestone Cord
30x33 0. S..7.88
33x4 0. S.................. 13.77
30x' Dunlop I. D. Truck..g......'" 25.47
PAY CASH AND SATE
Swinehart Tire & Rubber
Company ,
HIGHEST QUALITY TIRES
29x4.40 Balloo ................. 8.93
31x5.25 Heavy Duty.7............,..Q7:39
32x6.20 heavy Duty................, 23.61
33x6.0I Heavy Duty.........,..,... 20.71
Extra Heay Duty Truck.........26.89
WE HAVE CHEAPER BUT NONiE BETTER
PAY CASH AND SAVE

40x5 Extra It. I. 0. S................$26.89
13x5 Extra II. '. Truck .................. 29.74
'i 3xoExtra h. 1). Truck............... 31.87
33x6 Extra ,I. h). Truck ..................41.36
.Mx4% .....................................18.18
36x43 . .... . .19.37
I2x6.00 ............. ............. ....... 18.97
4x7.34)..............................29.3
Can Furnish Cheaper Tires That Not Better

33x5 I. I. Trek........................29.74
THEkY'RE 1IGfHEST QUALITY TIRES
Can Furnish Cheaper Tires for Less Money
PAY CASH AND SAVE
SWINEHARIT SOLID TIRES WITH RIMS TO FIT
30x3 Rnim...........................$20.40
30x5 and 33x5 Wheels ..................47.20
UNITED STATES TIRES
34x7 Roayl Cord ...................$.. $;9.S2

Best

MOHAWK TIRES
It. D. 30x .25........ ...........
BIKE TIRES, COUPON, $1.50
ON BIKE TIRES

.$W.67

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Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Goal
Solvay and Gas Coke

Hood Rubber Co.
HOOD RUBBER CO.
Best Quality Tire
30x. . . ......$12.40
30x4.95................13.3)
30x5.77 H. ............. 23.15
31x .25 .................. 17.401
33x6.00 H. D........... 24.20
33sI H. D. Trke:........-36.60
Hood HasN ACheaper Tire But
N one Better

Pennsylvania Tires

hi IGHET 51'QUALITY

Fall Tires
HIGHEST QUALITY

This business has been growing ever
since it was established. The secret-
"giving absolute satisfaction to 9ur
customers." We believe it pays to do
business in a friendly way. If you
think so too, let's get together.

1 x ?75

.$10.98
........... .... 15.65
HI. D............22.34
I. D. ............ 21.71

27x4 ................. 6.97
2~4.0...... .......... .93
28x5.2...13.89
30x6.t. 15.97
33x6.0O. ..............17.89
33x5 H . DTruck.......29.74
32x6 H. D. Truck........41.36
34x7 r D. Trtuck .........65.05

We Have Tires Priced Dollars Cheaper But Not Higher Quality

-- Pay Cash and Save

£A'LJaI'li J£VI..IZ

i

I I

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