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May 02, 1928 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-02

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.

2, 1928.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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11teatre

Was Scene Of Biggest Riot

Crew Of German Monoplane Bremen
i Decorate Grave Of Floyd Bennett

DAT T iPLAY PRACTICI

FoU1 STUDENTS ARE ACCUSED
OF WV l1lTL1NG 1)U1ING
VERlFORM ANCE
OBEY REQUEST TO LEAVE
Mantager's Itenarks Rcsu't In Ipris.
ing wlil Ends In Violence, Damage,
And Legal Tangle
.. It was on a Saturday in. Marph,
1908, that the worst of the infamous
student demonstrations took place.
That was the date of the Star theater
riot, renowned in the tales that grad-

uates love to tell.
On that night a party of four stu-
dents from the University visited the
home of the flickering pictures that
was the Star theater on Washington
street. During the performance one
of the four students was accused of
whistling by a house policeman, but
he dgniqd it. A minute later the offic-
er told him to stop scuffling his feet
and ordered him to leave the show
house. Whereupon, the student got up
quietly and left. As he was passing
out of the theater it is alleged that
the manager of the Star said, "That's
right, officer, put the hound out."
Afterwards, the three companions of
the ejected student admitted that their
friend slapped the manager. And then
they alleged that the officer leaped
forwaiid and cut the head of the party
of the first part with a heavy blow of
his club. Some two hundred students
gathered around the theater that night
in protest against this treatment, but
tley dispersed quietly about midnight.
The Starting Point
That was the starting point. On the
Monday following this ejection, the
theater manager made a speech from
the stage in which he said that he
was not running his theater for the
students and that he "didn't want
them in the place." In answer to his
plea the whole campus turned out that
night to gather around the theater.
Urged on by curbstone harangues,
various irresponsible persons began
to hurl eggs at the white front of the
show-house. Jeers followed the eggs
and later in the evening bricks were
substituted for the eggs. One by one
the electric lights around the build-
ing were extinguished. One by one the
windows were crushed in and a two
by four battergng ram was used to
puncture the flimsy woodwork of the
theater front. 'At 11 o'clock a number
of students had broken into the build-
ing and had badly damaged it. An
electric piano was pushed from the
interior of the theater and a supreme
final chord was struck on it. Then
the piano was taken apart for souve-
nirs of the riot, and passed around
among the jostling crowds..
Piesident Angell, at that time head
of the University, heard of the dis-
turbance downtown and rushed to the.
scene in a horse-drawn carriage. "Gen-
tlemen," he said when he had seen

the results of t1 riot. "this is de- I en the senior law men were enlisted
plorahle." 13ut the disturbers of the to the cause. Contributions began tc
night's quiet refused to disperse. pour in to the Defense Committee or
.oo,e lIeeries Called the Release of the Students. And
Meanwhile, the police reserves were through the efforts of the entire town
called in andI began to make arrests the arrested men were released on
on the outskits of the crowd. This bond.
continued to arouse the already high Called To Stand
wrath of the students. Failing to dis- When the trial of the men began,
perse the crowd, the mayor of Ann President Angell, Dean Vaughan, and
Arbor ordered out a hose wagon from Mayor Henderson were called on the
the fire department. While the hose stand to testify. All claimed that the
was being run out, students uncoup- crowd was orderly when they were
led the joints and in other ways dis- on the scene. Yet David Rinney, own-
couraged the firemen, who, not being of he wrecked theater stated that
interested, returned to the barn. "two windows and a pillar were brok-
A score of arrests were made, most- en; the front of the building was
ly of innocent bystanders, according covered with egg stains." He esti-
to records. Few made any resistance; mated the damag at the sum of $1 6
one student even shook hands with The prosecuthg attorney was ex-
the of lier who appreheided him. The tremely bitter toward the prisoners
crowd gradually became quieted down At one time during the trial he
as midnight approached and only a made a statement that the police of-
handful of students remained around ficers had been under orders to fire
the courthouse until a later hour. into the crowd on the night of the
The day after the Star theater riot riot. "They should have killed som-e-
occured, the Michigan Daily of March one," he is reported as saying. This
18, 1908, came out with black head- statementsaroused strong censure
lines: "Filthy Hole Bears Name of from the attorneys for the defense.
County Jail, Airested Students Pass "Thman mstrneysate~deflaw.
Night Amid Revolting Surroundings.,, "Te man must be insane," one law-
Nigt Aid evotin Suroudins."yer said. "Or drunk again," another
The fifteen men whom police offic- added.
ers had arrested for disturbing the The trial of the students was re-
peace and the front of the Star thea- plete with horseplay, back talk, and
ter spent the night in the main cell comebc.torey deik each oth-
of the county jail, lodged with fifteencomebacks. Attorneys defied each oth-
tramps, all of whom were "revolting,"'er and resorted to personal exple-
tmpalofwo weeeotn," Itives.
according to the student paper of that Once, the judge called for a rol
date. t~ c~kn tee a ol
Fix Culprits' Bail to be taken of the defendants.
"They are all here, your honor," an
ftail for the culprits was fixed at " attorney for the defendants said fear-
$1000 apiece, and the fifteen misfor~ ing the delays of the law.
tunnates er la 1id h ,ff

di
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ri
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a
rr
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e
t
f

"falling of the Star and how it rose
again.' An effort was made 'to collect
money from all the classes to help
expenses. Some trouble was encount-
ered in trying to collect anything
from the medics.
Then began a period of two months
before the celebrated case came up
for trial. On May 9, 1908, the case fin-
ally came before the docket. And
the result of it all was that the
court showed leniency to the culprits
and the case, which had caused such
a furor during the interim, was dis-
missed outright. The judge even
praised, the students of the Univers-
ity, saying that they were the flnest
body of students in the land, even if
they had commited an indiscretion
in the matter of their rioting.
When interviewed regarding tVe
stand taken by the court, attorneys
for the defense stated that the judge
had taken the most reasonable and
judicial attitude that he could take,
even if he was closely connected with.
the University and a former student
at that. A bill for damages amount-
ing to $1,000 was presented the Uni-
versity and Was paid through the
combined efforts of the Student coun-
cil and other collecting organiza-
tions. And the riot was over.
WENLEY TALKS TO ADELPHII
Prof. Robert S. Wenley narrated
some interesting incidents when he
delivered the lecture "Experiences in
England" (before Adelpihi House of

A nation-wide hoax has been
petrated on the country by prac
jokers at Dartmouth coulege.
eral weeks ago the so homores
freshman held their anual car
battle. Then, with noihing -mor
base his story on thm tiht, a cai
author managed tIu break into
headlines of hundreds oft newspa
throughout the country.
Some of th" newspapers printed
story in black headlines and al
them named one hoy as the hero
fought off the entire opposing 4
single-handed. The st ories in
papers were identical with the
exception that the hero in each
bore a different name.
Whoever it was sent out the no
first went through the college <
logue. la each city to which it
sent, the story named a local bo
the hero ofthe class batt le who
injured in defending 1his class h
The time spent in telegraphing an
searching through the lists of fi
man and sophomores may have pr
to be a successful joke, but
authorities at Dartmouth are sea
ing for the ones who perpetrated
trick.
PORTABlfE
TYPEWRITER
Corona, Underi
Remington, o)
We hare all Hut
Some in colored duco finishes.
0. D. MOR RIL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone

Capt. Koehl, Baron Von Huenefeld, and Maj. Fitzmaurice, the Bremen
transatlantic fliers, are pictured here as; they were about to leave the train
in Washington prior to laying a wreath on the grave of Floyd Bennett.
REQUEST ADDITIONAL BULLETINS
Additional requests for the Uni- expected to be ready for mailing by
versity radio bulletin have necessi- the middle of next week.

II

w'.-. e~ U uw e ea u1anacut ed tot t elr
cells. Meanwhile, friends of the im-
prisoned men scurried throughout the
business district of the town gather-
ing prominent business men together
to stand bail for the confined stu-
dents.
"I will go bail for as many of the
boys as the court will let me," Walter
S. Mack, proprietor of a Main street
store, was quoted as saying. "Sure,
I'll sign up for the boys," said Al
Paul, another town merchant. And
that sentiment sppead over the entire
town.
Representatives and committees ap-
pointed from law classes hurried to
aid their fellow students. "Your hon-
or," pleaded one lawyer for his client,
"this boy is but 17 years old. He just
came here two weeks ago and took
no part in last night's disturbance. He
has few friends and is fai away from
home. I plead for leniency in his
case and ask that bail be lowered."
Three men over-zealous iii their
efforts to aid their friends, found
themselves caught in the legal tangle
and were thrown behind the bars.
Preparations for the defense of the
students went rapidly forward. Ev-

"I know it," said the court:
,"Then they do not have to stand
up," said the attorney.
"It is my right to have them stand
up, for I am near-sighted," stated
the court. And that ended the mat-
ter.
heated Dlscussions Arise
A heated discussion once arose ov-
er whether South Main street was
"up" - or "down." An attorney's an-
swer to one question was drowned out
by the barking of dogs which some-
one had brought into the corridor of
the court. And the trial proceeded,
with more heat generated wih every
friction of the fires of the attorneys.
The University Glee club gave a
special benefit performance in order
to raise money to defray the expens-
es caused by the trial and to pay for
the damage done the Star theater.
Songs were sung celebrating the

Representatives at its regular meeting
in Angell hall at 7:30 o'clock last
night. Having travelled extensively
in Europe and being for a time di-
rector of the Paris and London
branches of the American Union, Pro-'
fe'ssor Wenley could give many color-
ful anecdote's of his visits-abroad.

tated an increase in the number of
copies criginally scheduled to be pub-
lshed, Prof. Waldo M. Abbot, of the
rhetoric department, who has been
program manager and announcer of
the 1927-28 Michigan Night radio-
casts, declared yesterday.
Already more than the custom-ary
the bulletin, and it is planned to pub-
2,000 requests have been received for
lish approximately 2,200, Prolfessor
Abbot said yesterday. The bulletin is

IDAHO-Women here are found to
put in 55 minutes a .lay just talking
while men averaged about 40. Men
however spent almost three hours a
day on amusement, 35 minutes. more
than women students.

WEDEMEYER
Radio Servic

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