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April 26, 1928 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ished every morning except Monday
the University year by the Board in
1 of Student Publications.
iber of Western Conference Editorial
ation.
Associated Press is exclusively en-
to the use for republication of all news
:hes credited to it or not otherwise
d in this paper and the local news pub-
herein.
red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
an, as second class matter. Special rate
tage granted by Third Assistant Post-
General-
cription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
es.: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
street.
nes: Editorial, 4925; Business $1x14.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
..................Ellis B. Merry
Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymer
Editor............. Philip C. Brooks
Editor...........Courtland C. Smith
n's Editor.........Marian L. Welles
Editor...........Herbert E. Vedder
r, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
nt City Editor.... Richard C. Kurvink
~ . Night Editors
't E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
wart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Anderson sally Knox
ret Arthur John H. Maloney
A. Bochnowski Marion McDonald
Campbell Charles S. Monroe
Church Catherine Price
ard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
ic N. Edelso'" Morris' W. Quinn
ret Gross Rita Rosenthal
rg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
me F llmet Eleanor Scribner
B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
SF. Gessner Robert G. Silbar
E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
Hagelshaw George E. Simons
i I. Howell Rowena Stillmani
llace Hushen Sylvia Stone
:s R. Kaufman George Tilley
no F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
nee R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr
i J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
L. Lait, Jr foseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
nt Manager...George H. Annable, Jr.

I .

Peace" was negotiated in 1360 only
at the conclusion of war between
England and France. It is highly
significant, therefore, that in. this day
and age the United States govern-
ment believes that the execution be-
tween France, Great Britain, Germa-
ny, Italy, Japan, and the United States,
of a treaty solemnly denouncing war
in favor of pacific settlement of inter-
national controversies, would have a
tremendous moral effect and ultimate-
ly lead to the adherence of all other
governments of the wold.
The day when treaties resulting in
peace without war, the greatest pos-
sible and the most lasting peace, can-
not be too soon in coming about. Only
then when the work of war as a
means of settling disputes is assum-
ed by another agency, "there shall
be no more war."
HOOVER WINS
With 35 delegates secured as a min-
imum from Ohio, and all 39 of. the
Massachusetts delegates morally ob-
ligated to support him as a result of
the state primary vote, Herbert Hoo-
ver, seems to have registered heavily
in the Tuesday primaries. One can
scarcely agree with James W. Good,
leader of the Hoover campaign, "that
nothing now can stop the nomination
of the commerce secretary," but one
can agree to a certain extent with
the opinion that the results show high
hope for the Hoover campaign.
In Pennsylvania, nevertheless, on
the same day, the voters elected 79
uninstructed delegates to the Repub-
lican National convention, which, ac-
companied by the 90 from New York
state which will also go uninstructed
constiute a tremendous unit of power
in the impending nomination ballots.
If khepse strong delega.tions,. :under
the leadership of Andrew J. Mellon,
fail to indorse Hoover, as it is likely
that they will fail to endorse him,
the Hoover forces will enter the con-
vention with a handicap of 169 votes
-a matter not quite as optimistic as
the commerce secretary's' backers
might desire.
Taken as a whole the developments
of the week, while favorable to the
Hoover candidacy, are not overwhelm-
ing. Peinsylvania's mighty delegation
will go uninstructed-a loss to Hoo-
ver; Massachusett's group will doubt-
less be in sympathy with the com-
merce secretary; and in Ohio the
Hoover forces seem to have well over
half of the entire delegation, though
running against the name of the late
Senator Willis.
Hoover still leads all other single
candidates, to be sure, but Hoover is
scarcely assured of a majority over
all other candidates and uninstructed
delegations together. The popular
strength of the commerce secretary
is undeniable from coast to coast, but
by large states such as Pennsylvania,
where firmly entrenched machines
have a secure hold on the electoral
machinery, the nomination of Hoover
has been seriously jeopardized.

JST
AN
EXPLANATION
YESTERDAY WE WERE accused
of leaving the column to go out on
a date. We wish to state that this
was not the case, but we were play-
ing baseball. However, there are ru-
mors afloat that someone arranged
us a blind date for some time in the
near future.

i

'B
ar
K

g.... .......Richard A. Meyw
i... Edward L. Hulse
g ............. John W. Ruswinckel
. . Raymond Wachter
.............George B. Ahn, Jr.
n ................Harvey Talcott
Assistants
radley RayHofelich
mrnmeler Hal A. Jaeahn
irpenter James Jordan
{. Correll Marion Kerr
:romell Thales N. Lenington
ively Catherine McKinven
Egeland Dorothy Lyons
cer Alex K. Scherer.
Frohne George Spater
Fuller Ruth Thompson
Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
oss Lawrence Walkley
minter Hannah WaIlen

c_

PHURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1928.
it Editor-NELSON J. SMITH, JR.
TIE EW DEAN
)ngratulafils to Prof. 'Herbert
rles Sadler, newly appointed dean
he Colleges of Engineering and
iitectune are perhaps superfluous,
the ascent to a position as dean
one of the greatest engineering
eges in the world is an' honor
ch needs no comment. Unqualified
ses of the appointee before he
had an apportunity to establish
putation for himself in his new
tion are similarly superfluous, for
e who have known him through
27 years as teacher here have
all-established opinion of his abil-
and those who have not had, such
>pportunity are only too anxious
he will administrate his new
tion in a manner worthy of its
,t traditions.
he choice of Professor Sadler at
present time is probably a wise
A firm supporter of the policy
lie present University administra-
from the first, the new dean may
taps be able to iron out some of
differences which have arisen be-
n the engineering college and the
;ident-especially concerning the
rersity college. If the University
ege is to be introduced in the
neering college in spite of the
ity opposition, it is imperative
such a man as Professor Sad-
who is entirely in sympathy with
e placed in authority.
o comment of this kind would be
plete, finally, without a conclud-
word of tribute to the retiring
a Mortimer Cooley and the fac-
which built around him. As a
it of the immense prestige which
been gained for the colege dur-
the regime of the retiring dean,
path of the new man will be
.iderably smoother-a path which
ild easily lead to an even higher
'ee of achievement.
PEACE WITHOUT WAR
nce the middle ages most peace
ties have been written at the
:lusion of a war, the victor usually
ting and the vanquished usually
pting the terms. Nowadays, the
utiol difference lies in the fact
the majority of those nations ad-
ting the much discussed world-
peace, would have it avert, rather
fnlir ua . ad ifrn fn a

* * *
THERE IS A LOT to be said about
blind dates. We have known times
when we wished we were actually
blind after the first five minutes; be-
ing deaf and dumb would also have
helped on a few.
PERSONALLY, WE THINK that any
court will give a verdict of not guilty
in a case where a person has murder-
ed another for getting him a blind
date. Justifiable homicide we should
call it.
* * *
KERNEL, WHO WAS accused of
taking a flat tire to the military ball,
refutes the statement, saying, "I want
my public to know that I am not
taking the girl, she is taking me."
* * *
DUCK, MEN, DUCK
WE SEE IN The Daily that the
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts has mailed its warning list.
* * *
WE ARE HOLDING our breath with
each mail. We hope and pray that
none of our profs. have caught on
.to just how much we are not do-
ing.
** *
BUT THEN, SOMEONE must get
warnings and we may as well as any-
one else. What's a little warning or
two? . Not a thing, that is, as long
as the bank account at home doesn't
find out about it.
* * *
POLITICIANS NOTICE
NOW IS THE time for all good men
to come to the aid of their party, and
place some candidate before the stu-
dent body for election to the stu-
dent council.
* * *
IF YOU ARE not lined up with
some political machine already, do
so at once - 'perhaps you will be
the candidate, BUT NOT TODAY.
* * *
WE RECEIVED AN offer from one
party of just about anything we want-
ed if we would turn our power of
publicity loose in favor of its candi-
date.
* * *
WE REFUSED, SAYING that the
campus politics had always been clean
and we would not be the one to start
things on the down grade. The cam-
pus elections are free from all cam-
paigning, muck-raking, log-rolling,
wire-pulling and the rest, ABER
NICHT HEUTE.
* a *
HOWEVER, IT, WON'T BE long
now before we find out if we made
a mistake in turing down the offer
and waiting for a better one, or
not.
** *
CARVE 'EM, BOYS
NOW WE LEARN that seniors may
carve their names on the tables down
in the Union tap room. It's just about
the only chance one has to get even
with the Union.
* * *
IN THE OLD days when this sport
was carried on down at Joe Parker's
it must have been exciting. From all
we can gather of what sort of a
place Parker's was, one never knew
if he was carving on the table or on
someone else's head.
* * *
IN MOST CASES, it wouldn't have
made much difference. Drunks are
drunks, and then remember that the

Union was conceived by four men sit-
ting around a table down at Park-
er's.
* * *

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC
THIS AFTERNOON: Zona Gale,
novelist, will lecture in Hill audi-
torium at 4:15 o'clock.
TONIGHT: The All-State or-
chestra in 11111 auditorium at 8
o'clock.
TONIGhT: Comedy Club's
"Meet the Wife" in the Mimes
theater at 8:30 o'clock.
"MEET THE WIFE"
A review, by Vincent Wall
About one thing more need be said
about this production: that is, it is
an excellent show window to display
the histrionic abilities of four peo-
ple-Phyllis Loughton, Harlan Cristy,
Thomas Dougall and Robert Wetzel.
Lynn Starling has created four excel-
lent characters, and an almost good
farce comedy. It fall short only in
the fact that at times the travesty
becomes too apparent, and the action
falls into a silly jumble of pawky hu-
mor, ingenious situation but clumsy
craftsmanship.
It is then that the cast finds itself
with the problem of turning this ab-
surdity into comedy. The work falls
mostly on the shoulders of Miss
Loughton, and the measure in which
she succeeds is a tribute to her ability.
She keeps the tempo up, and at the
same time turns Gertrude Lennox into
a very funny lampoon of the sub-
urbia club woman.
Cristy creates a portrait of Amer-
ican Babbittry that is unique-it has
sympathy and considerable humor.
Thomas Dougall manages to capture
more of the rather low comedy which
the entire piece should have. And
Robert Wetzel-always the conscious
artist-plays Victor Staunton a bit
too consciously, but broadly and well
enough.
** *
THEATER ARTS EXHIBIT
A criticism, by Robert J. Gessner
It is an exceedingly rare occasion
when the Department of Speech pre-
sents the campus with a cultural ex-
hibit. However, there is at present
such an exhibition in the new School
of Architecture, and it is well worth
the attention of all admirers of art
on the campus.
To the "Theater Arts Monthly" much
credit can be given for their collec-
tion of original stage and costume de-
signs. The majority of the exhibits
are unusually good; there are a few
that demand special attention. There
are five scenes by Raymond Soveyon
Shaw's "Saint Joan" that was pro-
duced by The ' heater Guild, and they
are outstanding in technic and concep-
tion. There are, however, three vivid
scenes from O'Neill's "Hairy Ape"
along with a most effective scene from
his "Emperor Jones" that also com-
mand serious attention and minute
appreciation. On the other hand there
are several pieces that seem almost
impossible as fan as staging is con-
cerned, and we wonder how success-
ful these were when presented. One
of these futuristic scenes is a project
for Wagner's "Ring," and is entitled
"The Ascent to Valhalla in Das Rhein-
gola," and incidently looks something
like it sounds. Shakespeare is given

justice by Jonel Jorgulesco, who
sketched a striking scene from Mac-
beth. All the subtle metaphysical
relations of the tragedy are embodied
in this terrifying picture. This same
author has a" sketch for Tollen's "Ma-
chine-Wreckers," and was enacted
when that play appeared in the Boston
Repertory Theater.
Act One of "Seventh Heaven" by
Austin Strong is given a satisfactory
setting by Georgiana Brown. Moliere's
"George Dandin" has a scene by Cleon
Throckmorton that was produced by
the Provincetown Players, which is
highly seasoned and exceptionall well
done.
* * *
"PORGY" IN DETROIT
The Masonic auditorium is housing
the Detnoit run of Theater Guild's
production of the Dubose Heyward
play, "Porgy," which is coming direct
from a successful season in New York.
This play of Negro life is unique
as such plays go for the fact that it
ignores the ever present Negro-white
problem and confines itself strictly to
a sympathetic and thoroughly realis-
tic treatment of the black boy among
his own people. The locale of this
colorful pageant is Catfish Row, the
heart of the darkie colony, and fur-
nishes a splendid background for the
Ayraflfl n.v lho ra nt.. rt whonrrofl

ALWAYS TO BE HAD AT

GR.;AHAM'S
Both Ends of the Diagonal x

The Latest and Most Important

STUDENTS-IT WILL PAY YOU TO
SEE OUR SAMPLES
TAILOR-MADE CUSTOM CLOTHES
Drive over and get measured for your
Sprin; clothes. We have a very
choice selection including some fine
importations.
Suits Cleaned and Pressed, $1.00
CHAS. DOUKAS
1319 South Universiky
...TEAMSHIP
FOR ALL LNES
TOURS; CRUISES
FIRST, SECOND, CABIN.TOURISTS THIRD ESPECIALLY
Phone6412or write6-3i Ii. huron St-eet
E. G. Kuebler, Steamship Agt.. Ann Arbor
--NOW--
LOUISE FAZENDA
in
FOOTLOOSE WIDOWS'
CHARLIE CHASE COMEDY
This "Ad" with 14c
SAT.: REGINALD DERNNYi
"A CHEERFUL FRIAUD"1

i
}

o

$100 to $1000 PER WEEK IN MOTION PICTUREST YES!
IF YOU HAVE "IT"
But, folks, there is no way in the world to determine whether you do or do not have
"IT," without actually making a SCREEN TEST of .you.
Recent developments now make possible the making of SCREEN TESTS in almost
any town or city, so our Directors and Cinematographers are going to nearly 100
towns and cities throughout the United States with their cameras, lights, make-up and
everything necessary for mnaking these, SCREEN TESTS of you and for you, and it
you do have "IT," your TESTS ewill be submitted tothe producers for their considera
tion. An opportunity of this kind has never before been presented, because of the tor-
merly impracticable methods of making these TESTS outside the-studio.
To get a Screen Test made by the studios, if you were right here in Hollywood, is
almost an impossibility, therefore you can realize what this opportunity means to you.
Present plans include SCREEN TESTS of ONLY those registered in advance. This
may be the opportunity of a lifetime. Do not fail to avail yourself of it. Full infor-
mation and registration blanks will be furnished FREE upon request.
CINEMA ARTS TESTING BUREAU
Lock Box 425, Hollywood Station, Hollywood, California.
NOTE:-The above will not appear in the Motion Picture magazines before the July
tissues. This opportuntiy is being given to you in advance' of the general public, because
nert and women with University training have, a decided advantage over those who are
less fortunate. Arrangement will be made for these tests at such dates and hours as
will not conflict with your school work. We are lookingfor STAR material and the
number of aIplicants who will be registered for these tests is limited, therefore your
request for details should be forwarded promptly.
AMAY FESTIVAL
Ann.Arbor, May 16, 1 7, 1 8,1

I

11

Fiction

i

Woodward, at Eliot
BONSTELLiE
PLAYHOUSE
NIGHTS, 75c, $1.50. Mats. Tues.,
Thurs. and Sat., 50c, 75c
Last Week, Beginning Monday,
April 23
2 Girls Wanted
A Comedy of Youth, Romance
and Thrills

11

HUGO KIRCHHOFER
Chorus Conductor - Teacher of Voice
Hollywood, California

I

and

March 4, 1928.

is
..mmwml..

f. ;,

11

General

GARRICK
Beginning Sunday, April 22
Return by Popular Demand
ANNE NICHOLS'
Abie's Irish Rose
At These Astonishing iPrices
Nights 50c to $1.50
Wed. and Sat. Matinees 50 to $1

Mr. Charles A. Sink,
President, The University Musical Society,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Books

My dear Mr. Sink:-

w
a
s
as
i r
r
mw
+ws
a

CASS THEATRE
Starting Sunday, April 22
Night $ $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
Wed. and Sat. Mats. (Best
Seats) ..............$1.50
Chamberlain Brown Presents
TAYLOR 1hOLES
In a Riotous Comedy
The Great Necker

,:,
:. ''
,:,
-=
,
Ci
...
: ,
r
...
..
..

ill

In my estimation all Mu'sic Festivals, if done on
the scale for which your work is known, are of
greatest importance to the community. Not only do
they give enjoyment and instruction to the people
fortunate enough to attend, but any city able to con-
tinue such events for so many years, stamps itself as
an artistic center of first rank. The prospectu's you
sent me is good and very interesting, not only to my-
self, but to my dear friend ( Dr. Ray Hastings .organ-
ist of the Temple Baptist Church, Los Angeles.
Wishing you continued succes's and greetings
from Hollywood, Cal., I remain,
Sincerely yours,
(Signed) HUGO KIRCHHOFER.

Shubert-Lafayette
Beg. Sunday Night
THURSTON
THE FAMOUS MAGICIAN
Nights, Sun. and Sat. Mat. 25c
to $1.50. Popular Mat. Thurs.,
25c to $1.00. Plus tax.

Course Tickets-$5.50-$6.00-$7.00

;.
,.5
'I"
4
4.

I

EDITORIAL COMMENT

11

c

I

' i'

II

LESS CUMBERSOME COURTS
(The Toledo Blade)
Addressing the Cincinnati Lawyers'
club, Edson R. Sunderland, professor
of law at the University of Michigan,
advocated the abolishment of inter-
mediate courts of appeals in Ohio.
The learned professor's suggestion
deserves careful consideration for he
is an eminent authority and has stud-
ied the situation carefully.
With comparatively few exceptions,
important cases in this state are be-
gun in the courts of common pleas.
There are thousands of appeals an-
nually from the decisions of these
courts, having headquarters in the
counties, to the district appellate
courts. Some hundreds of cases go
up each year from the district courts
of appeals to the state supreme court.
The figures showing the percentage
of appeals courts decisions reversed
by the supreme court are not at hand,
but it may be assented conservatively
that in most cases substantial justice
is done by the common pleas and ap-
peals courts.
It would be impossible, of course,
for the one supreme court sitting in
Columbus to hear all the cases now
carried up from common pleas courts
to the intermediate appeals, courts. It
would, however, be possible and prac-
ticable to confer upon the district ap-
peals courts. It would, however, be
possible and practicable to confer up-
on the district appeals courts final
jurisdiction in all, or most cases in
which there may be unanimous agree-
ment among the three judges. In the

MICHIGAN

I

BELL
CO.

TELEPHONE

Long Distance Rates Are Surprisingly Low
For Instance:

or less, between 4;30 a. m. and
You can call the following points and talk for THREE
shown. Rates to other points are proportionately low.
Day
From Ann Arbor to: Station-toStRatio"
ALBION, N. Y..................$1.6o MADISON, W
BINGHAMTON, N. Y. ...........95 MARQUETTE
CHAMPAIGN, ILL. .............. 1.55 JACKSONVIL
GREEN BAY, WIS..............41.45
PEORIA, ILL......................1.70 ROCHESTER,
JEFFERSONVILLE, IND.........1.60 ROCKFORD,
LA SALLE, ILL. ................ 1.55 EVANSVILLE
LOUISVILLE, KY. .............. i.6o BLOOMINGTC

I

OH! FOR THE
men were men,
glass.

good old days,
and beer cost

when
5c a

7:00 P. m.
MINUTES for the rates
Day.
Station-to-Station
Rate
VIS. ...............$x.6o
MICH. ...........1.80
LE, ILL.. ......1.95 -
N. Y.............1.70
ILL...............1.50
, IND............. 95
ON, ILL. .......... 1.65

* * *
JUST A REMINDER
WE CAN'T THINK of anything fun-
ny to day, so we are forced to re-
mind the campus that anyone is wel-
come to contribute a column. The
object of .this is to find someone to
fill our boots, (size 9 1-2). If you have
feet that large just come around and
we will see what can be done about1
it.

The rates quoted above are Station-to-Station Day rates, effective from 4:30 a. m. to 7:00 p. M.
Evening Station-to-Station rates are effective 7:00 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. and Night Station-to-
Station rates, 8:30 p. m. to 4:30 a. m.
A Station-to-Station call is one that is made to a certain telephone rather than to some person in
particular.
If you do not know the number of the distant telephone, give the operator the name and address and
specify that you will talk with "anyone" who answers at the called telephone.
A Person-to-Person call, because more work is involved, costs more than a Station-to-Station
call. The rate on a Person-to-Person call is the same at all hours.

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