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April 25, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ESTABLISHED
1890

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VOL. XXXVIII, NO. 152.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1928.

4

REGEN TS .N AM E
SUCCESSTOR TO
COOLE'S POST
PROFESSOR HERBERT C. SADLER
APPOINTED DEAN OF SCHOOL
OF ENGINEERING
ANNUAL BUDGET IS PASSED
Mycological Library and Collection
Of Higher Fungi Accepted
From Dr. H. A. Kelly

NOMINATIONS FOR
COUNCILARE DUE

;
l:
'
f
i

Petitions to nominate candidates for
positions on the Student council
should be submitted to Courtland
Smith, '28, president of the council,
as soon as possible, it was announced
yesterday by officials of that body.
The final date upon which these pe-
titions may be turned in is noon on Sat-
urday, May 5, and they must con-
tain the names of 10 per cent of the
students of all schoolsrand colleges
on the campus.
nThree junior members and three
senior members will be elected to the
council at the. all-campus elections
to be held on Wednesday, May 9, and
the regular nominations for the men
to hold these positions will be made
by the Student council nominating
committee on Wednesday night of this
week. This pnivilege of nominating
additional men by petition, however, is
guaranteed by the constitution of the
council.

OVERWHELMING
VOTE APPROVES1
FLOOD CONTROL'

HOUSE PASSES SENATE
TOTING 2491, OYER
PARTY 'LINES

BILL,I

GRAFT ISSUE OF GARGOYLE CAUSES
FUROR AMONG CAMPUS POLITICIANS

WOLVERINE NINE TAKES FOUR"
CONSECUTIVE BIG TEN BA5EB9

Prof. Herbert C. Sadler, head of
the departments of marine engineer-
ing and naval architecture in the col-
leges of engineering and architecture,
was last night named dean of the
colleges of engineering and archi-1
tecture to succeed Dean Mortimer E
Cooley, by the Board of Regents of!
the University, at its regular month-
ly meeting in the law building. The
appointment will become effective on
July 1.
Matters of the University budget
for the coming year and various mis-
cellaneous matters so occupied the
time of the Regents that the action
on the University College question
was delayed until a special meeting,
scheduled to be held at 9:30 o'clock
this morning.-
Adopt Budget
The total budget adopted by the
Regents for the coming year, includ-
ing in its estimate the University hos-
pital, is listed at $8,535,508.68. This
marks an increase over last year of
$186,503, which has been spread gen-
erally over all the expenditures, ra-
ther than for any single item or
itemr;s. The amount from this total for
the hospital alone amounts to $2,-
587,841.47.
Mortimer E. Cooley, to whose place
as dean of the engineering college
Professor Sadler succeeds, has been
on leave of absence from the Univer-
sity for the past year. He will take,
up his resience in Georgia, after
serving tho engineering college as
dean since 1904, and the architectural
college since 1913. Dean Sadler is a
native of London, England, and holds
degrees from Dulwich college and the
university of Glasgow.
Gift Is Accepted
A gift of a mycological library and
collection of the higher fungi, valued
at more than $100,000 was accepted
by the Regents from Dr. Howard A.
Kelly, of Baltimore. This will be-
come the property of the University
henbarium, and will be known as the
L. C. C. Krieger mycological library
and collection.
Degrees of Bachelor of Arts were
awarded by the Regents to Bernard L.
Goldman, Frank E. Gray, Melvin- A.
Oll, and Richard J. Shaull. Professor
Dewitt H. Parker, of the philosophy
department, was granted sabbatical
leave for, the first semester of the
year 1928-29 to study esthetics in
Europe. Professor Lawrence M.
Gould, of the geology department, was
granted leave of absence for the year
1928-29 to serve as geographer for
the Byrd antarctic expedition.
ROME IS SUBJECT
OF SPEECH TODAY
Henry Burchell, secretary of the
Italy-America s6ciety, will speak at
8 o'clock tonight In the west gallery
of Alumni Memorial hall on "The Re-
birth of Imperial Rome." This lecture
will be of 'articular interest to stu-
dents of landscape design and city
planning, inasmuch as he will describe
the life of present day Rome and the
hitherto unpublished plans for re-
storing the capital of Italy to its for-
mer grandeur.
Mr. Burchell, who was formerlyda
lecturer, of 'the Greek and Latin de-
partment of Columbia university, is a
prominent Italian scholar, and has
been honored by the king of Italy for
his work in the betterment of inter-
national relations by an appointment
as Knight of the Order of S. S. Mau-
rizio e Lazzaro.

SENI'OR STUDENT WINS
LOCAL CONTEST PRIZE
Karl K. Liebrand's Paper Will Be Sent
To The Executive Council For
National Competition
FRESHMAN PLACED SECOND
By outscoring 1 competitors in the
local examination of the third annual
New York Times. Intercollegiate Cur-
rent Events contest held last Friday,
April 20, Karl K. Liebrand, '28, was
announced winner of the first prize
of $150 yesterday, by the l-ocal com-
mittee for the contest.
The 'second prize of $75, which was
awarded to the underclassman making
the highest score, was won by Oscar,
R. Fuss, '31, while Elliott H. Moyer,
'30L, won the $25 third prize.
1Liebrand, recently elected a member

PRESIDENT'SVETO FEARED
Provisions Objected To By Coolidge
Cause Heated Arguments During
Discussion On Measure
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, April 24.-By the
overwhelming vote, 254-91, the House
today passed the Senate flo l con-
trol bill with its supporters and
House administration leaders decid-
edly confused as to what reception
the bill will receive at the White
House.
The final showdown found 34 more
members than the two-thirds neces-
sary to override a presidential veto
supporting the bill, but it remains
problematical whether the measure
again could muster such strength in
the face of expressed opposition from
President Coolidge.
Bill Draws Support
The bill drew its main support
from Western Republicans and par-
ticularly the solid Democratic mem-
Oerrhip, but even some of thi admin-
istration men broke over -it the last
minute and voted for the measure.
Included in the later group were
Reps. Madden, of Illinois, the veteran
chairman of the appropriations com-
mittee, who until today had joined in
the fight to revise the measure to
meet the President's objections, and

The political number of the Garg-
oyle, campus humor magazine, sup-
plants the regular May issue and will
make its appearance on the campus
today. It is devoted to campaigns,
Chicago and otherwise, dirty and
clean.
Pity the poor freshman who plays
the leading role in the cover, "The
May Poll," drawn by Ken Holmes,
'29A. The election will be far from
above board according to these indi-
cations. It is quite fitting of the
character of the remainder of the
magazine.
The big feature of the new issue is
"A Politician's Life" as scribbled and
scratched by Bill Emery, '28, and Lou
Spaulding, '28. The two write a piece
that is indeed epic in its character
but dealing with a subject seldom
met with in this type of work. The
development of the grafting politic-
ian from babyhood to jailhood, with
emphasis laid on his college career is
humorously done.
Another literary feature of interest
is the "Politician Takes an Exam," a
politician who could teach many stu-
dents a leson at writing much and
saying little. He avoids the point of

each question better than any uni-
versity student.
An inovation is a full page drawing
of a girl's head such as has appeared
in- many of the humor magazines of
the country. Walker Everett, '26
does the sketch while "H.R.H." con-
tributes the verse to the picture.
Books reviewed this month are:
"Crusade' by Donn Byrne, "The Cam-
pus" by Robert Cooley Angell, "The
S'tranger at the Feast" by George Ag-
new Chamberlain, "The Half-Heart-
ed" by John Buchan, "Strange Inter-
lude" by Eugene O'Neill, and "Daught-
ers of Polly" by Cosnro Hamilton.
The "Music Hath Charms" depart-
ment is devoted to reviews of the
latest records that have been issued
by Columbia, Victor, and Brunswick.
DR. *. 0. HOTCHKISS
GIVES -ADDRESS HERE

GAME, DOWNING

I1

Michigan Batsmen Connect In Pinc
Behind McAfee's Stellar Tossing
To Nose Out Hoosiers
OOSTERBAAN, LOOS AND M'AFEE ACCOUNT FOR R9
By D. C. BARTON (Sports Editor Indiana Daily Student)
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., April 24.-Michigan's Conference-le
baseball squad retained its perfect record when it handed India
first Big Ten defeat of the season, 3-0 here this afternoon. Only
hits were registered by the -invaders, and the Crimson squad got si:
The first Wolverine run came in the second inning when Benny C
baan tripled into deep center for the first Michigan hit, and came
the plate on a passed ball. Weintraub hit a sacrifice fly, and
playing shortstop for Indiana made a bad relay to third base.
McAfee, Wolverine sophomore pitcher, held Indiana hitless
second, third and fourth innings, while Russell Paugh, who occupi
mound for the Deanmen until tl
(1 ft All inning, kept the visitors hitting
P N rrn r age low.
9ID 8 HII8 2l r

N DIANA,

CLASSES AT I

1

WIL

BE DISMISSED FRIDAY~
Only Clinics To Meet )turing Assembly
Of Schoolmasters Club And Faculty.
In Hill Auditorium
LITTLE TO BE CHAIRMAN
No classes with the exception of
clinics will be held at 11 o'clock Fri-
day morning in the University ac-a
cording to an announcement made by
University officials. The reason for
the bolts will be the special convoca-
tion which is to be held at that time
in' 'Hill auditorium for the School-
masters club and University mem-

President Of Michigan College Of Min-
ing And Technology Delivers
University Lecture
STRESSES METAL VALUES
The interrelation and interdepend-
ence of the upper and lower penin-
sulas of Michigan was stressed by
Dr. W. O. Hotchkiss, of the Michigan
College of Mining and Technology, in
a University ,lecture yesterday after-
noon given in the Natural Science
auditorium.
President Hotchkiss, who spoke on
the subject of "Upper Peninsula Ores
and Lower Peninsula Factories," do-
lared that "About 60 per cent of the
industries of Michigan are based either,
wholly or partly upon iron or copper.

FOR SPECIAIL SHOWING
Final Performance of "For The Love
Of Pete" Will Be Given Friday
For Schoolmasters' Club

TICKET

SALE NOW OPEN

1

to Phi Beta Kappa. national academic Chairman Snell of the House rules
honor society, will have his ,paper committee.

forwarded to the Executive council
for the contest. The grand prize ofJ
$500 will be awarded to the best1
paper of all 20 of the competing col-.
leges.
Fuss, who wa-s awarded the second;
prize because of making the highest,
score of any underclassman, placed
second in the final totals. He had the
highest score of all the local compet-
itors on the factual part o-f the ex-
amination. Moyer, who placed third,
has been a member of the Varsity de-
bating team for the past two 'sem-
esters.
In speaking of the contest, Prof.
Everett S. Brown, of the political
science department ,and chairman of
the local committee for the contest,
said, "The papers of the underclass-
men this year showed a marked im-.
provement. The high standing they
made by placing five men among the
. first ten justifies the awakding of
I the second prize to them and augurs
well for the success of the contest in
the future."
ORDERS DUE FOR
.APSAD GOWNS
All senior literary students must
order their caps and gowns this week
as no orders will be taken after Sat-
urday, it was announced yesterday
by William Pusch, '28, assistant chair-
man of the caps and gowns commit-
tee of the class. A table will be plac-
ed in the lobby for the taking of or-
iers and during the remainder of the
week the caps and gowns can be or-
dered direct at Van Boven, Inc.
The pmice of the caps and gowns
this year is $7.50, of which $3 is re-
turned when the caps and gownsare
returned. No payment is necessary,.
however with the placing of the or-
der.

The measure tomorrow will be re-
ferred back to the Senate for that
body to pass the many revisio is de
when approved by the House. House
supporters believe the Senate will
approve the changes, at least in prin-
ciple.
Consideration of the bill precipi-
tated the most heated fight in the
House this session between President
Coolidge and its membership, and for
10 days House Republican leaders
made frantic efforts to eliminate from
the bill a number of provisions ob-
jected to by the President.
Changes Accepted
Some of these changes were accept-
ed by Chairman Reed, of the flood
pontrol commitee, in charge of the
bill in the House, but on other points;
he declined to yield, thereby making
it problematical as to the action the
President will take.
The nreasure would authorize an ap-
propriation of $325,000,000 for con-
trolling the turbulent flood waters of
the Mississippi river by the construc-
tion. of levees, stilibays, and flood-
ways. With the exception of the
states providing the levee right-of-way
on the Mississippi river proper, the
federal government would shoulder
the entire cost.
FLAMES DAMAGE
RESTAURANT HERE
Fire which started shortly before
midnight in the basement of the Nem-
eth Sandwich shop at 620 E. Liberty
street smoked out several residents
of the apartments above the restaur-
ant.
Theafire was brought under control
}soon after the arrival of the fire de-
partment. Damage due to smoke and
water is estimated at $1,500.

bers.
This convocation is an annual oc-
currence with the Schoolmasters club,I
and is opened each year to all those
outside who wish to attend. This year,
President Clarence Cook Little will
be the chairman, and the main address'
will be delivered by Dean Gordon{
Jennings Laing of the Graduate School
of Arts and Literature of the Uni-
versity of Chicago. Dean Laing will
use for his subject "Literature and
Leisure."
It was also announced from the
offices of the School of Education that
admission to the various meetings of
Schoolmasters club and the groups
held in conjunction with it will be
by badge only. Those members of
the University who wish to attend the
meetings and also wish to sit down-
stairs at the championship high school
debate and the annual high school
orchestra .concert Thursday and Fri-
day nights in Hill auditorium will be
required to obtain badges for en-
trance free. These badges may be ob-
tained tomorrow morning in the of-
fice of the Registrar.
As an additional feature of the meet-
ing, Dr. W. L. Westerman, professor
of history at Columbia university, will
give a University lecture in connection
with the classical conference of the
club at 4:15 o'clock Friday afternoon
in room 2003, Angell hall. His subject
will be "Transportation and Coimn-
ication Changes in Antiquity."

The industries of lower Michigan take
a dollar's worth of raw materials
from upper Michigan, and by the ad-
dition of capital, skill and intelligence
make it into about a hundred dollars
worth of product."
Speaking upon the value and ex-
tent of the manufacturing of the state,
Dr. Hotchkiss stated that goods, val-
ued at more than four and one-third
billion dollars, are produced annually.
He added that employment is given
to half a million wage earners and
that there is state payroll of $800,000,-
000.

With the. inal appearance of the
Junior Girls' Play, "For the Love of
Pete," scheduled for 8:30 o'clock Fri-.
day, April 27, at the Whitney theatre,
both choruses and principals in thei
play are rehearsing daily, and look-
ing forward to the closing perform-
ance, according to reports fiom the
executive committee.
Tickets for the production are now
on sale atthe box office of the Whit-
ney theatre, or may be obtained
through' Marie Hartwig, '29, at Helen
Newberry residence. In addition,
seats will be procurable at a'desk
set up for a sale of tickets Thursday
and Friday afternoons in University
hall.
Although the showing of the play
is being given in compliment to the
Michigan Schoolmasters' Club, con-
venimrg here this week-end, tickets are
open to the general public. The
show will be rem'embered for its suc-
cessful run of a week at the Whitney,
March 19-24.,
Critics of its earlier showing spoke
only in terms of high praise. Ellis
B. Merry, editor of The Daily, re-
nrked: "From its clever opening
dialogue to its really climatic finale,
the current issue of the Junior Girls'

Attempt Comeback
Coach Dean sent Bell to the pit
er's mound in the last inning in
attempt to revamp his outfit fo
comeback. Weintraub, the first n
to face Bell, hit a single, after wh
Bell held Michigan hitless.
A muddy diamond slowed b
teams, and made it almost impossi
for them to exhibit much fast p
ing, but both teams were outstan
in their fielding.
Loos, McAfee Score
Most of the balls sent to the
field were in the well, only twe
three clean garden hits being mai
up by either team. Indiana's
chance to stage a comeback after i
by Loos, and McAfee in the fifth
brought the total for Michigan up
three, :came in the last -half of
same inning when Bucher stepped
to the plate with bases full and
down. McAfee sent three balls
one strike across and Bucher
nected with the next one for ah
pop-f ly which landed squarely in
Afee's glove..
A grounder -from Wells to I
who got the ball over to Oosterb
in plenty of time, -ended the ga
after Boroughs had struck out
Bell had been put out on a play i
shortstop to first.
The Box Score
MICHIGAN AB R H PO A
Nebelung......3 0 0 4 0
Loos... .......4 1 1 4 3
Lange... ...4 0 2 0 (
Corriden.....3 0 0 1 0
Oosterbaan 4 1 1 9 0
Weintraub.....4 .0 1 1 2

"The question arises,"- Dr. Hotch-
kiss said, "does lower Michigan get)
her iron and copper from upper Mich-
igan, or does she obtain it elsewhere?
The answen is obvious. Because of,
the fact that iron ore is shipped di-.
rectly to the consumer from the mines,7
Michigan industry cannot afford to
overlook the saving of transportation
charges for long hauls for her iron.
She must buy Michigan ore as it is
available."
"To the average American, iron and
copper are merely two metals which
happen to be used more or less in
industry, and upper Michigan hap-
pens to be one of the places where
these metals are found. To us who
live in the upjer peninsula," President
Hotchkiss continued, "the situation is
very different-iron and copper make
up our whole existence." -
"The actual manufacturing of these
iron, steel and copper products," Dr.
Hotchkiss concluded, "makes up an
interesting chapter in the story of our
metals. No state has profited along
this line more than lower Michigan."

Morse.....4
McCoy ........4
McAfee.........4

0
1

0
2

6
1

Play goes through varied movements
of successful -m'usical comedy with
greatest merit in its array of capable
principals and in well-executed dance
numbers."
"Frankly and briefly," Philip C.,
Brooks, staff editor of The Daily, re-
ported, "For The Love of Pete" pro-
vided for me more fun than any oth-
er campus production I have seen.
And that not meaning just low com-
edy fun, for this show is a splendid,
example of a good play well done."
The setting of the play is a floating
university, and the theme consists
of "a scintillating satire" on intellec-
tualism. As such it makes ample use
of its opportunities to satirize the
pedantic professor, and yet it remains
within the realm of "good fun."
Tickets are priced at $2.50 for the
entire main floor, $2.00 for the first
four rows balcony, $1.50 second four
rows balcony, $3.00 for box seats, and
$1.00 for the remainder of the house.
Profits from this showing as well as
the original week's run will go to the
Women's League building Fund. "

TOTALS . .34 3 7 27
INDIANA AB R H PO
Ray ..........2 0 1 3
Bucher........3 0 0 1
Harrel........4 0 2 2
'Derr ..........4 0 1 3
Burks........4 0 0 6
Wells.......3 0 1 1
Magnabosco ...4 0 0 5
Boroughs......3 0 1 3
Paugh........2 0 0 0'
Hickey.......1 0 0 1
Bala...y....1 0 0 0
Bell....... 000
Corell ... .....1 0 0 2.
TOTAL ... 32 0 6 27
Score By Innings
Michigan.........010 029' 000-
Indiana.........000 000 000-
HOOVER LEADS
PREFERENCE V
(Bfy Associated Press)
COLUMBUS, April 24.-Set
Herbert Hoover was leading a:
candidates in Ohio's presidenti
ference vote today on the firs

FAMOUS PAINTING PURCHASED BY
REGENT CLEMENTS FOR LIBRARY

LITERARY SCHOOL
MAILS WARNINGS
Announcements of warinings nd1
probation for laxity in studies at the
midsemester are now being mailed
from the office of the assistant dean of
the College of Literature, Science and
the Arts, accordinig to an announce-
ment from that office last night. All
of the 'slips should 'be in the mail
within a few days, the report indicat-
ed. Two slips are sent out in all of
these cases, one slip to the student
and the other to the parents.
It is expected from present indi-
cations that the number of students
to receive warnings and probations
will be much lower than at this time
last fall. The exact number to be sent
out will be announced in a few days.
BUSINESS SCHOOL
WILL SHOW FILMS

Senior Canes
In order to enable all seniors
to secure their canes before the
traditional "Cane Day" which
will be held Sunday, the few re-
maining canes will be on sale
again this afternoon in Univer-
sity hall between.1 and 5 o'clock,
it was announced last night by
senior class official's.

CHINESE LECTURER POINTS TO
CHANGES IN ANCIENT CUSTOMS

GOULD TO SPEAK
ON ARCTIC TRA VELI
A general idea of the hardships of
Arctic travel will be given by Prof.
L. M. Gould, tomorrow night, whenI
he speaks on "Some Geographical As-
pects of the Putnam Baffin Island
Expedition 1927."
The lecture will be given and il-
lustrated in, Room 4054 of the Natural
Science building at 8 o'clock and is
under the -auspices of the Geological
and Geographical Journal club. Pro-

"The Death of General Wolfe," a
famous painting by Benjamin West,z
showing the final scene at the battlej
on the Plains of Abraham in 1759, has
been purchased for the Clements li-
brary by Regent William L. Clements
of Bay City, it was announced yes-
terday. The painting, which has gain-t
ed wide popularity in reprintsc
throughout America and Europe,t
shows General Wolfe prostrate, sur-
rounded by membemis of his staff and;
English and Indian soldiers, as he
died at the famous victory. Wd
The painting, known as the Waldeck
copy, was the thirdsmade by the fanm
ous artist of the same scene, and is
considered to be the finest of the
three, including a larger area and
rp inpnntd vWest after he had

armor and flowing togas, and because a
of this -practice the leading critics,
joined by the king of England, frown-
ed upon his first effort.
The picture was bought by Load
Grosvenor, however, and when ex-
hibited attracted such a volume of at-
tention that King George III finally
changed his mind and ordered the ar-
tist to paint another exactly like it
for him. Count Waldeck of Germany
also ordered one, which was the third
and final painting of the scene made
by West, and it isthis third picture
which Regent Clements has recently
purchased.
The Gmosvenor painting is in Ottawa,
Canada, in the possession of the Do-I
minion of Canada to which it was
presented by the duke of Westmins-

Optimism as to the future of China a democracy," he continued, "and ev-
is most prominent in the reactions en those i, the North are strongly a-
of Paul C. Meng, general secretary of gainst the dictatorship for of gov-
the hinse tudnt hritia asoc-ernment. It is because of this that
the Chinese Student Christian assoc- the poorly equippedarmy of the Na-
iation in NorthAmerica, who has just tionalistic government is now advanc-
i-eturned from a lengthy stay in China ing successfully on Pekin, defeating
and Europe. Meng will speak on a much better equipped army, and
"China, Whither Bound?" at Natural causing 'the moral support of the
Science auditorium tomorrow at 4:13 people."
o'clock, under the auspices of the Meng also reports that he found
Chinese student's club. ,.conditions of the working people out- -
"One of the most pronrinent indica- side the war areas absolutely norm-
tions of change in China," Meng said, al and educationally greatly improv-
"during the five years that I was in ed. "More people," he continued,
this country is the numerous Chin- "have learned to read and are using
ese women who now have boyish the newspapers to get a political
bobs. It seems to me that the num- knowledge of their country than ever

tered returns.
Two hundred and fifty-nine
cincts reported out of a total of
in the' state gave Hoover 3145 to
for former Sen. Frank B.tW
whose name appeared upon the
lost, Senator Willis died March
BOSTON, April 24.-Early re
from the Massadhusetts presidi
primary showed Hoover and J
far in the lead in the preside
preference vote in the Republican
Democratic contests, respectivel:
TICKETS ON SAL
FOR SENIOR BA

Three films will be shown by the
School of Business Administration at
4:15 today in Natural Science audi-
torium. This constitutes the eighth1
of a series of industrial pictures spon-
sored by the school. The pictures arel

i

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