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April 22, 1928 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A

N

HALTS

7"MICHIGAN-ILLINI

BASEBALL

GAA

E

IBLE-HE&OER TO BE
VED AT CHAMPAIGN!

( MICHlIGAAN BATTING AVERAGES

1

onenjent Of Yesterday's
Will Necessitate Double
Bill on Way 12

GaMe,

AB
Morse............10
Oosteribaan .......13
McAffee .......... 9
Lange... ........9
Corriden .........12
Weintraub ........11
McCoy..... ......15
Nebelung.........12
Slagle.............3
Asbeck...........5
Loos .............13
Squier... 1

5
6
4
4
5
4
5
4
1
1
2
0

H R

4
1
2
3
5
4
6
0
0
1
1

PCT.
.500
.462
.444
.444
.417
.364
.333
.333
.333
.200
.1.54
.000

It

Seems There Were Two Irishnen---Gene And Tom

VOGEL MAKES

PROTEST

Rain, one of the elenents against
which coaches cannot guard, put an
end to Michigan's unusually active
first week of Big Ten competition
yesterday when a steady rain set in
in the morning, causing the postpon-
meat of the Illinois contest and thus,
necessitating a double header May 12
at Champaign.
This will compel the Wolverines to
play three hard games in two days, as
they are scheduled to meet Iowa in ar
return engagem-ent May 11 at Iowa
City.
With three games in two days a-
gainst teams of the caliber of the
Hawkeyes and the Indians, co-holders
of the 1927 title and generally recog-
nized as two of the strongest outfits
-in the Big Ten, Coach Fisher realized
.the difficult assignment that must be
fulfilled and intends to point the team
for this series.
Must Uncover Anotiher Hurler
His major task appears to be the
uncovering of another pitcher of suf-
ficient ability to stay the Indian bats,
as Asbeck will probably be sent to the
mound against the Hawks, leaving
only McAfee available for duty at
Champaign.
The Michigan coach has a number
of promising twirlers, but they tack
experience under Conference fire.
Gawne, Holtzman, Martin, Moffett,
Nebelung, and Oosterbaan represent
.the outstanding possibilities, although
Gavne is the only one of the group
who has evei, faced a Big Ten oppon-
ent.
Oosterbaan May Pitch
There seems to be strong possibility
that Bennie Oosterbaan, who starred
against Clemson in the role of a re-
lief pitcher, may solve Fisher's prob-
lem. The big, first baseman has all of
the asseth of a capable pitcher, except
experience. He has plenty of speed,
fair .control, and is developing a curve
ball.
le came near making his Ferry field
debut in the capacity of relief pitcher
in Friday's game after Squier had bat-
(Continued on Page Seven)
'Fhis Page Edited
ALEX A. B90hNOWKI '2$)

SThese include Big Ten games
to date only.
WOLVEFRINElS TO HAVE
With favorable ground(l and weather
conditions, there is little doubt that
Michigan will have a strong tennis
squad this year-what with four of
the best five men on last year's cham-
pionship team back and some half
dozen others pressing the veterans
for places all the way.
Try-out matches have been playel
in spite of the courts which are in
the worst condition in years, making
real practice a hazard. With the Con-
ference season to open here Saturday
with Northwestern the squad is in
need of match play which it hopes
to get with the Detroit tennis club
Wednesday.
Further matches will be played to-
morrow in an attempt to make an in-
telligent selection for the Detroit
matches from the large number of
candidates on hand while the Detroit
competition should aid greatly in de-
termining the men to oppose North-
western.
Of the veterans- Captain Barton,
Schafer, Moore, Algyer- Barton and
Schafer are going especially well
while Moore seems to be slumping a
bit though it is merely practice work.
Coach Hutchins is faced with a
problem in making up a team with
Heaney, Bacon and Elliot showing up
in great shape and mighty close to
displacing a few of the letter men.
All these are new to the Varsity squad,
the latter wining numerals last spring
while the othe,4 two could not play
last season because of the one-year
ruling.
In addition to these, Graham, Kemp-
ner, and Brody are just a bit back
along with Farbman, Lamoree, Felix,
Marshall and a few others.
Graham led the freshman last spring
and has a fine record in practice
matches.

SPORTS CAlLENARI
'roiorrdw
Tennis-First round of the inter-
fraternity tennis tournament.
Tuesday
Baseball-Michigan at Indiana. ,
Friday
Baseball-Syracuse, here.
Saturday
Baseball-Syracuse, here.
Tennis-Northwestern, here.
Track-Drake Relays, Drake
University, Des Moines, Iowa.
YE[ARHLING BALL -SQUAD,
NUMBERS MANY MEN
Following Coach Jack Blotf's. call
for freshman baseball candidates, 68
players have been engaging in pre-
liminary practice sessions in batting
and fielding at Ferry field during the
past week. The latest additions to
the squad consist mainly of infield-
ers and outfielders as the battery
candidates have been having regular
workouts ever since the week preced
ing the Spring vacation.
With a view of getting a line on the
most promising players, Coach Blott
put the men through their paces yes-I
terday in Yost Field house, and this1
drill will be continued tomorrow outI
of doors, the weather permitting. Ap-
proximately twenty of the yearlings
will be dropped from the squad on
Tuesday in the first cut of the season,
thus enabling the coach to develop

- '
-_ 7 s \
_- -___ ENEYN.
- N

10METER VICTUOY
Sprinter IVI1i Seek To W in I00-lePtAr
Pasli For Second Time In The
Corning Olympics

ACHIEVED ONCE BEFORE
(By Associated Press)
NEXW YORK, April 21. - Charley
Paddock will attempt this year to ac-
complish a feat only one other athlete
has ever achieved-win the classic
Olympic 100-meter dash for the sec-
ond time.
More than a score of years ago, Ar-
chie Hahn, former University of
Michigan track star, and no relation
to the present distance iuning Lloyd
Hahn, registered a dual triumph but
ouly two years separated his victor-
ies at St;. ILouis in 1904 and Athens in
1906.
It was eight years ago that Pad-
dock leaped into the tape first at
Antwerp, a foot ahead of his fellow
Californian, Morris Kirksey. Four
years later the stocky blond flier ran
no better than fifth in the 100 meters
1at Paris but he came within an eye-
lash of beating Jackson Scholz for,
the 200-meter championship in a hair-
raising duel on the Colombes track.
Now Paddock is getting in trim for
hiis third Olympic venture, along with
hIis old rival Scholz. The life of nm'ost
sprint aces is short but age has dealt
kindly with these two veterans, both
counted upon heavily in plans de-
signed to bring back to the Unit ed
States the 100-meter laurels that now
belong to England.
Sprinting supremacy is one of the
things Uncle Sam has cherished most
when it comes to Olympic competi-
tion. It was a shock, therefore, to
Yankee pride when the rangy Harold
Abrahasm, Cambridge University star,
galloped in ahead of Scholz, Bow-
man, Paddock and Murchison at Par-
is four years ago.
Now out of competition, Abrahams
will be at Amsterdam only in the
role of "non-playing" captain of the
British track team, but America will
do well to be prepared for some un-
expected threat.

By F. G. VOS UIGi1
(Feature Service Sports Editor) 1
NEW YORK---This is a story of
two Irishmen-Gene and T'om- and
of how they were dropped into oppo-
site corners of the world, followed the
natural fighting propensities of the
Irish and are now to find themselves
in opposite corners of a ring with the'
world's heavyweight boxing champ-
ionship at stake.,
Already te forthcoming title bout
between the Champion Gene Tunney
and Challenger Tom Heeney is being
ballyhooed as a great "international"
battle. Actually it boils down to a
good old Irish shindig. Both Gene and
Tom were born of Irish parents not
long removed from the Ould Sod.
The difference is that somewhere.
near the toime the Heeney's headed
south and east for New Zealand, be-
jabers, the Tunneys came, to New
York where the father worked as a
stevedore and where the boy who
would be king was born.
While Tunney was jabbing his way
upward toward his championship, the
New Zealand Irishman was subjugat-
ing Australia and vicinity, Africa and

Ireland. In search of cash enough to'
buy himself an overcoat, history has
it, he turned to America.
When HJeeney appeared on the New
York pugilistic scene 14 months ago
he and Tunney were the only Irish-
men among Tex Rickard's hand-pick-
ed heavyweights, outside of Jimmy
Maloney, the glass-chinned South
Bostonian. When the dust cleared a-
way Heeney was still standing up
like a rock above the Lithuanian
Sharkey, the Austro-Hungarian Risko,
the French-Canadian Jack Delaney,
and the Spanish Basque Paulino, so
it happens that the Irishman from
"down under" and the Irishman from
Greenwich Village are to meet in the
big shot.
All the Irish fight, but they don't
all fight alike. Witness John L. Sulli-
van, the burly bruiser, and James J.
I Corbett, the master of science.
Now history repeats itself and here
we have Thomas Heeney, the burly
l bruiser, and James J. Tunney, the
master of science. In that other all-
Irish fight years ago at New Orleans
the boxer won but the fighter had
seen his best days and was out of

condit:
over-c

ion, weakened by inactivity and
onfidence. Now' it's the boxer

who's up against the handicap of ring,
rustiness.
Heeney and Tunney don't talk alike
any more than they fight alike. Tom'
has picked up the "Blime's" and the
"Haitches" of the "H-English" with
whom he has been thrown most of
his life, while Tunney, ruling the
heavyweight roost in a part of the
world where boxing is patronized by
the "best people" along with the more
delicate arts of literature and the
drama, has come to run m-ore to
words of nlany syllables.
But toss the pair o'thim in a ring
and you'll see quick enough they're
a couple of Irish, and it doesn't take
very close scrutiny of their physiog-
nomies either, to see that they carry
around part of the map of the old
isle:

the most potential material. In
paration for practice encounters
the Varsity, a tentative line-up
probably be picked the first of
week.

prie
with
will
next

ANN ARBOR RESIDENT IS
WINNER OF OXFORD AWARD
George Patterson Faust, Ann Arbor,
won his "full blue" by capturing the
pole vault event in the recent Ox-
forA-Cambridge dual meet. Faust, a
graduate of Princeton, is now attend-
ing Oxford. He is the son of Lt. Com.
Wm. H. Faust, '02L.

3REPAIRING
We sell and service all makes of Typewriters
The Largest and Best stock to select from in Ann Arbor,
backed by skilled service.
at Rider's Pen Shop
Phone 8950
ALL MAKES

NEW YORK-Walter Hagen
sailed for England where he
compete in the British open
championship on May 7.

has
will
golf

- 4
A

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A wrinkled tic may destroy
an otherwise perfect ap-
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will wear twice as long.
Send them with your suits
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The man in a new suit may
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111 11

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