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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 18, 1928 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNE nAY_ 1

s

THF. M l~ iCr i 'ITCAN L-tiAT.Y W-P M I1V 1~lVA-- - a a a a. a...-' a.,'J.fJsa £1 L t1tILJ L 1

Published every morning except Monday
ring the University year by the Board in
>trol of Student Publication.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
isociation.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
led to the use for republication of all news
patches credited to it o' not otherwise
edited in this paper and the local news pub
hed herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
postage granted by Third Assistant Post
ster eneral.
Subscription by carrier $4.oo; by mail,
6ffces: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
rd Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 2214
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITUR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
litor...... ........ ..Ellis B. Merry
ito Michigan Weekly Charles E. Behymer
:al. Editor ... . Philip C. Brooks
ty Edito .. . Cortland C Smith
omen's Editor........Marian L. Welles
orts :Editor ..........Herbert E. Vedder
neater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
sstant City Editor.,,, Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
bert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
Stewart JIooke Kenneth G. Patrick
aul J. Kern Nelson J Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaun
Reporters
ther Anderson Sally Knox
[argaret Arthur John H Maloney
ex A. Bochnowski Marion McDonald
an Campbell Charles S. Monroe
ssie Church Catherine Price
a chard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
hirrnec E Moris W. Quinn
:argaret CGross kita Rosenthal
alborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
arore Amer a leano Scriber
Imes B. reerar Corinne Schwarz
bert J. Gesse Robert C. Silbar
aine E. Grubet Howard F. Simo
ice Hagelshaw George E. Simon
sepho~ E. Howel Rowena Stillman
Wallace Hushen Sylvia Stone
adles R. Kaufman George Tilley
illiain F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
wredce R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
)nald J: Kline 'Benjamin S. Washer
k L. Lait, Jr. Toseph Zwerdling
BtJSESS'EA ,FF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
sistant Manager...George H. Annable, Jr.
vertising .. . . Richard A. Meyr
vertsng. . Edward L. Hulse
vetisig........John W. Ruswinckel
:counts... ... Raymond Wachter
rulaion. ........George B. Ahn, Jr.
blication . ... .... ..Harvey Talcott
Assistants
orge Bradley Ray Hofelich
arie Brummeler Hal A. Jaehn
tries Carpenter James Jordan
arles K. Correl Marion Kerr
rbara Cromell Thales N. Lenin gton
stry Dively Catherine McKinven
ssie V. Egeland Dorothy Lyons
as Felker Alex K. Scherer
therine Frohne George Spater
Suglass Fuller Ruth Thompson
atrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
len Gross Lawrence Walkly
J. Hammer Hannah Wallen
rl W. Hammer
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18, 1928.
Night Editor-J'. S. HOOKER
With the theft Monday of four new
pcoats from coridors of theWest En-
neering building the possibility of
1 epidemic of such depredations sim-
wr to the one four years ago again
comes apparent. Not only do the
w spring coats, hung unguarded in
e corridors, offer an attractive bait
thieves, but the chances of appre-

I

cult to judge the justice of his charg-
es. On the other hand, and quite as
likely, lie may be a sincere and hon-
est champion of a cause which he be-
lieves to be for the benefit of his alma
mater. Whatever the case, charges of
graft and political conspiracy, such
as the charges which he made against
the State College, are certainly far
too serious to be dismissed with a
wave of the hand in the form of a
suspension.
LAKES TO THE SEA
With the recent publication of di-
plomatic exchanges between the Unit-
ed States and Canada concerning the
St. Lawrence waterway it appears that
the difficulties standing in the way of
its construction have been reduced
from both political and technical ob-
jections to technical points only. The
proposed substitute of a barge canal
through New Yorlk state has appar-
ently been abandoned, and the ob-
jections of the Canadian government
inspired by fear of competition with
Canadian government railroads seem
likewise to have disappeared.
The points about which the two
governments are still at odds seem
to be first the division of the cost of
the project, second the question of
lake levels as now affected by the
Chicago diversion, third the questions
of tariff and embargo and fourth, the
exportation of power. On all of the
points at issue, it seems from an im-
partial standpoint, Canada demands,
only her just due, and it seems ex-
ceedingly likely that the United States
will be willing to concede her north-
ern neighbor such consideration.
All in all the prospects for the
waterway, while not holding any im-
mediate promise, have seen worse
days. Continuous reports by engi-
neers, transportation authorities, and
government experts in favor of the
project are bound to have a cumula-
tive effect in time, especially when
backed by a powerful Middle Western
public opinion. The recent disclos-
ures, in short, are far from discour-
aging to those who have advocated the
plan through years of seemingly un-
appreciated' effort.t

AST EDROLL
TO THEE,
Once more the Inlander is back in
the Press building. This is its first
appearance among us since its mostj
recent revival in 1925. The historyl
of the Inlander, you know, is one
continuous series of discontinuances
and re-establishments.
* * *
The staff now occupies the other
side of the table in the Gargoyle office.
It would be terrible if the copy of the
two publications became mixed. Still,
could any one tell? If the Gargoyle
made the happy mistake of printingj
part of the Inlander, it would result
in a pretty good'issue for our cam-
pus humor magazine.
THE PRIZE POETRY NUMBER!
Bursting upon the campus in all its
pristine glory comes that flare-bomb
announcement that the next issue of
the Inlander will be devoted to spring
poetry. Think of it! An entire num-
ber of the Inlander devoted to spring
poetry. Pray for;good, warm weather,
boys, and mayhap the Muse will stir
you.
* * *

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC
EXIT MASQUES
Spring, breaking with blizzards and
blossoms on the Ann Arbor Rialto-
that dirty little alley behind the Union
-finds the campus placarded again
with news about the new Comedy
Club show. The advertising campaign
is hurried so that vacation-filled purs-
es will last until the opening night,
and playgoing regathers interest only
temporarily checked by the holiday.
The bandwagon is drawn up full-
horsed for splendid Spring ride, while
the proverbial forty men are confi-
dently expected to get killed in the
rush on the box office for tickets. All
of which suggests that the drama-
if you can call it such, locally- is
suffering, or perhaps even enjoying,
a revival at Michigan. Whatever your
point of view, however, Mimes is mak-
ing money, Comedy Club is earning a
reputation, and people ale actually
trying to get into Play Production
classes.
Such awe inspiring conditions are

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I

EDITORIAL COMMENTj

la

Of course there will be a poetry con- not without their philosophical, eco-
test in connection with this issue. One nomical or pessimistic implications.
could expect that. And although all There seems to be a struggle going
the contestants will submit their ef- on. War has not broken out very
forts with no thought of winning the widely yet, but at least one "red-skin"
prize-art for art's sake, etc.- there has bit the dust. "Masques," dramatic
will be a prize, just to create some organization for women alone, has
jolly rivalry among us poets, you succumbed. Very quietly it passed out
know. of the picture duriing vacation, leaving
behind memory of a splendid record
GET IN LINE! of excellently produced and well acted
plays begun: in 1915. Anyone interest-
'--- ;ed in the "why" of the situation can
LICENSE blame it on Mimes commercialism,
BUREAU~'Comedy Club's high-hat, or the in-
crease in necking technique which
makes dates more pleasant than play-
----____acting. It does not matter much
which reason is hit upon. Members
The above photograph shows Leo of Masques intimate that the comple-
C. Hayburner and Alyse Chevrolet, tion of the Women's League building
constant contributors to the publica- will revive interest in an all-women's
tion, applying for poetic licenses in organization a they comfort then-
preparation for the forthcoming con selves with this. Anyone else can
test. too, if he is particularly affected.
But if this is the first sign of a
MRS. LITTLE struggle for theatrical business on the
SOFFERS PRIZE campus it certainly is a cheeringI
omen. It may even be so important
an event as to suggest to some of
Mrs. Clarence Cook Little, wife of the clumsy children who are now
a prominent university president, has messing about with dramatics that it
offered a $10 prize to the writer of is time to "snap out" ofchildish ways.
the best sonnet published in this next'Mimes and Comedy Club might con-
issue. In addition to this specialcivably take a hint.
prize, George Wahr,, who has philan-cev ytk hn
thropically been publishing the Inlan-R A
der since the last renaissance or two! E T * * *
(an no thy g ad pll dityEXIT SADIE THOMPSON
(andi now they go and pull a dirty IJeanne Eagels so lately the heroine
trick like a oetrv number!) offers a

What Shakespeare
says about Co ca-Cola

IFf
5. .e'Act III, Scene 4.
x{0\ 'y S. 1

-,t

Fill full. I drik
to the general joy
o' the whole table"

Delicious and Refreshing

1 ,, %

PEDAGOGICAL LULLABIES
(M'Iinnesota Daily)
Voltaire in his working account of
the death of his still-living enemy,
Berthiery maintained that he had died
in a closed carriage, poisoned by the
fatal dullness emanating from some of
his own books and papers. His travel-
ing companion, Couton, was resusci-

Certainly Macbeth,
the same thing as
we say:

meant
when

t
f
If
f

Refresh Yourself!
Thc Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, Ga.

i

V7 .r

8millionaday-IT HAD TO B E GO OD TO GET WHERE IT

I5S

-I r
tI

tated with great difficulty, but Ber-1
thier was quite dead, killed by hisc
own platitudes and toxic insipidity.I
.,f
After reading of such a tragic occur-
rence, the student is careful to leave
the windows open in certain class-1

iiars

Ahead

prize of a-similar amount for the best
all-around poem. (We are going to
horse the whole bunch by submitting

fnsio
emel]
ly b
ndin
sults
rbin
rhe
rt,
ildi
e ef
ats
an h,
on
>st e
such
>m o
It ro
at b
pos
rme
to

Pilob
ave t
f thes
f the
atirely
tciliti
te pa
ooks
imp
ith thi
. the
imove
:ctivel
)mplis
e el
.herw:

n or such criminals are ex- rooms, foil many lecturers, if not as a
y slim, and in the past it has dangerous as frere Berthier, might
been by strenuous efforts, ex- very easily put themselvds as well as
g over :several montis, tb t their auditors into a sound slumber.
s have been accomplished n The most effective anodyne of the
g the thefts.
suggestion of Ward A. Daven- lecture hall is the speaker who bores
assistant superintendent of the an audience simply because he hasj
ng and Grounds department to nothing to speak about. There is little
fect that students carry their hope of recovery for this type. An-
with them to their classes rather other soporific is the human "grist
ang them in the halls seems to mill" 'who has read everything there
the face of the situation the is to read about some particular phase
effective way of putting an end
i robbery. In almost any class- of learning, and who, when placed
of the University there is suffic- before students by his department,
oom to lay a coat over a va- grinds out an hourful of well-chopped
ench, And even the floor, with facts, so many of them, so solid and
ssibility of slightly soiling the substantial that one marvels how he o
nt, would be somewhat prefera- could ever cram them all into one th
the chance of losing it entire- mortal cranium. The saddest scho- Ze
lastic sedative, however, is the man .fo
yselhintin oil woman who knows his field and is
o be taken in the elmiation keenly interested in it, but cannot suc- ge
se thefts will be the removal ceed in carrying his ideas to his lis- ce
coat hooks from the corridors teners. Such is that unfortunate class ye
y. The development of locker of professors, instructors, and stu- is
es, steadily carried forward in dents who must needs throw a hand- of
~st few years, can make the Iful of ahs, uhs, and a's into every
unnecessary for those who find spoken sentence.
'ossible to carry their coats It is not only disconcerting but po
em; and the complete ilemoval highly tantalizing to start out with a re
coat hooks from the halls would speaker on a promising line of thought po
the evil of thefts just as ef- only to come up with a sudden jerk go
Ly as that thing can be ac- before a long "ah." After diawing no
shed, providing, of course, that a deep breath and scraping around in yo
ements of honesty cannot be his cerebral corridors for the next
ise impressed on the guilty par- happy phrase, he starts out again from -
the point where "ah" interrupted him.
But by this time one has forgotten
S SUSPENDED his firfst words. Following the speak-'
e Bloss, Michigan State Col- er's second movement one \bumpr/
phomore, has been suspended one's nose sharply against another 1
hat institution for his recent "ah" just as one begins to recall the
tl attack on the college's ad- first phrase. A little of this goes a
ation through "The Student," long way. The jerk method of 1ec-
literary publication. Such turing is a mental torment but a sen-
of course, was only to be ex- suous delight. Whereas thoughts are

roundeau!)
* * *
CO-EDS AID
YOUNG POETS
Above is a picture snapped by Rolls'
wn newsreel service (The Lies of
he World) and it shows clearly the
eal with which the boys are striving
)r inspirational poetry.
The Inlander staff will scrape to-
ether its savings of the past quarter
entury (They brag about being 25
ea1s old. Twenty-five years of ex-
tence and .21 reorganizations) and
fer a second prize of $5.
* * *
Robert Frost, who also writes
gems, will be the martyr who will
ad all the contributions. He also,
)or man, will judge them. Our hat
es off to you, Bob, though you know
at what you do-at least not what
u are running into.
* * *:

of that lusty and not too honestly
daubed chromo of the tropics "Rain,"
is raising considerable disturbance in
Equity. Instead of being a good girl
and taking her suspension for desert-
ing "The Cardboard Lover," in Mil-
waukee, like a lady, she is going to
organize an outlaw company of inde-
pendent actors. Miss Eagels is one
of the best one woman attractions in
the country, and one of the few who
might be able to get away with such
a revolt. The outcome, however, is
very doubtful.
* * *
Gloria Swanson, meanwhile, has
taken up Sadie Thompson's mantle,
and has made a good thing of it in
the movies. Which is very fortunate,
for Gloria needed a money making
film, oh! so badly. The threat of with-
drawing the pictur~e on moral grounds
has been dropped, probably for a con-
sideration, and Sadie was not made
an honest woman, even for purity's
sake.
* * *
"DAISY AND DAPHNE": A
Novel by Rose Macaulay. Har-
court, Brace and Company, New
York, 1928. $2.50.
(Courtesy of The Print and Book
Shop)
We find ourselves in the sad state
of having used up all our commenda-
tory adjectives on previous books just
when "Daisy and Daphne," the best
of them all, happened along. Miss
Macaulay's latest work is fully de-
serving of all the pet words which'
we keep in the file marked "Super-
Excellent'-words Ilike "charming,"
"delightful," and "entertaining" -so
deserving, in fact, that we refuse to
use all the trite phrases of yester-
year.
In oui' opinion "Daisy and Dahpne"
is the best book of the year, Miss
Macaulay's best book, and will prob-
ably remain the best book of several
years. Thus do we exult the dis-
covery of a work combining nerfetinI

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"Spring weather really isn't
here," said Miss Hardlie Rates,
poetry editor; of the magazine, in
an exclusive Rolls interview yes-
terday, "but that will not stop
US.,,
Truly said, Hardlie, for the In-
lander does stop at nothing.

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